Jump to content



Photo

PC Lens


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 chris fawcett

chris fawcett

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 1016 posts
  • Europe

Posted 03 June 2009 - 05:48 PM

Hi All,

I've been too busy to post much recently, but had to share this one with you all. I turned up for a shoot in NYC today. It was all architectural interiors, and I was expecting a simple, if demanding day. When the camera turns up, it's a reasonable HD camera tricked out with the ubiquitous 35 mm lens adaptor, and get this—a perspective correction lens!

For architecture, right?

LMFAO
  • 0

#2 Sam Morgan Moore

Sam Morgan Moore

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 238 posts

Posted 11 June 2009 - 05:01 PM

Hi All,

I've been too busy to post much recently, but had to share this one with you all. I turned up for a shoot in NYC today. It was all architectural interiors, and I was expecting a simple, if demanding day. When the camera turns up, it's a reasonable HD camera tricked out with the ubiquitous 35 mm lens adaptor, and get this—a perspective correction lens!

For architecture, right?

LMFAO


As a professional stills shooter and a steadi newb a PC lens makes perfect sence to me ignoring any jitter or FF issues

Keeping the lens perpendicular to the ground keeps the buildings standing straight the PC is then used to adjust the headroom of the shot

I find a tilted pan (sticks or steadi) around a building/room with all those leaning verticals changing during the pan most unnapealing

very sensible imo

S
  • 0

#3 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 2922 posts
  • LA, Ca

Posted 11 June 2009 - 05:55 PM

As a professional stills shooter and a steadi newb a PC lens makes perfect sence to me ignoring any jitter or FF issues

Keeping the lens perpendicular to the ground keeps the buildings standing straight the PC is then used to adjust the headroom of the shot

I find a tilted pan (sticks or steadi) around a building/room with all those leaning verticals changing during the pan most unnapealing

very sensible imo



Yet impractical and virtually impossible ESPECIALLY since the camera describes an arc as you tilt
  • 0

#4 Sam Morgan Moore

Sam Morgan Moore

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 238 posts

Posted 12 June 2009 - 12:29 AM

Yet impractical and virtually impossible ESPECIALLY since the camera describes an arc as you tilt


Im being unclear

If you have the rig on - everything horizontal - and a conventional wide lens you frame a shot of the big hotel foyer (or whatever)

Your shot will contain too much floor and not enough height to show the room properly

You must tilt the rig up to create a pleasing composition - ie one where the elements of the image fill the frame - BUT you now have leaning verticals in the composition and a tilted rig

You then have to operate tilted - horrid

And if you pan all the uprights in the shot lean - even more horrid

If you slap on a PC lens you keep the rig flat and use upshift to compose a pleasant shot that is easy to operate

-

Conversly if you want to do a full length walkie of someone who is the same height as you get the same problem

With a flat rig sitting above waist height and conventional lens you must tilt forward to frame them head to foot - giving them a big head, small feet and losing verticals in the composition

With a little lens PC down shift you can create a pleasing composition and keep the rig flat

At 6'5 Im taller than most people and find a little downshift is very helpful to operating

The nikkor 28/3.5 PC manual lens is the one to test - it has many attributes like a non click Iris and great focus that make it moddable for use with a Steadicam

http://en.wikipedia....ve_control_lens

S

Edited by Sam Morgan Moore, 12 June 2009 - 12:36 AM.

  • 0

#5 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 2922 posts
  • LA, Ca

Posted 12 June 2009 - 02:13 AM

Im being unclear

If you have the rig on - everything horizontal - and a conventional wide lens you frame a shot of the big hotel foyer (or whatever)

Your shot will contain too much floor and not enough height to show the room properly

You must tilt the rig up to create a pleasing composition - ie one where the elements of the image fill the frame - BUT you now have leaning verticals in the composition and a tilted rig

You then have to operate tilted - horrid

And if you pan all the uprights in the shot lean - even more horrid

If you slap on a PC lens you keep the rig flat and use upshift to compose a pleasant shot that is easy to operate

-

Conversly if you want to do a full length walkie of someone who is the same height as you get the same problem

With a flat rig sitting above waist height and conventional lens you must tilt forward to frame them head to foot - giving them a big head, small feet and losing verticals in the composition

With a little lens PC down shift you can create a pleasing composition and keep the rig flat

At 6'5 Im taller than most people and find a little downshift is very helpful to operating

The nikkor 28/3.5 PC manual lens is the one to test - it has many attributes like a non click Iris and great focus that make it moddable for use with a Steadicam


In 24 years of flying the nobel instrument I have NEVER had to deal with issue that describe. If I want to control the perspective I will use a dolly. But using one with steadicam is folly.

Seriously you are creating a "Solution" for a problem that doesn't exisit.

BTW GB is over 6'5" and hasn't resorted to PC lenses....
  • 0




rebotnix Technologies

Varizoom Follow Focus

Teradek

Boland Communications

Betz Tools for Stabilizers

GPI Pro Systems

Omnishot Systems

Ritter Battery

Engineered Cinema Solutions

Wireless Video Systems

Paralinx LLC

BOXX

IDX

SkyDreams

PLC - Bartech

PLC Electronics Solutions

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS