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I'm doing my first Job Abroad, What should I look out for?


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#1 Kelli Lee

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Posted 24 May 2009 - 02:04 PM

Hi fellow shooters!

This is my first post to the steadicam forum. I am new to the world of the Steadicam and have been following your extremely informative posts for the last half of the year. I thought it was high time I finally joined, so here I am!

I shoot with a HVX-200 and Glidecam setup. I'm hoping to graduate to the bigger boys (Tiffen+f900) in time.

I will be going on my first out of the country job next week to the Dominican Republic for a week long Fashion show and I was wondering if I could get some pointers from other globetrotting shooters?

Has anyone been to DR before? Are there any unspoken rules of the trade when working in an environment with unfamiliar customs?

I am still learning set etiquette. Is there anything I need to keep in mind when working with Fashion and other live events?

Sorry for being such a noob, but thanks in advance for your help!

~Noodlz
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#2 RobVanGelder

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 02:53 PM

That's a coincidence, I am leaving for the Dominican Republic tomorrow, for a television series. Not sure where you are located but you might sms me and we'll see if we can meet.

I am not familiar with fashion shows, so I cannot give you much info there. But be careful, as often you will have to walk in dark spaces (next or under the catwalk) so be aware of cables and other objects. that you can trip over.
Also, you might have to walk between the catwalk and the audience, who will not always approve of that (they paid to sit there).

Have a good time.
Rob
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#3 Sydney Seeber

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 08:16 PM

Although a lot of it has been still work, I've done quite a bit within the fashion realm... 1st rule of business, don't make the girls uncomfortable... I've seen a lot of gawkers' eyes light up when a girl shucks off her top like she's an NFL linebacker in the locker room after the Super Bowl... I've only had to escort a couple of guys off the premises in maybe 10 years of doing it, but just don't be that guy... that's all I got. As far as audience members, the money goes both ways. Some pay to be there, some are paid to sit there, and the PR people will do everything in their power to make sure you get an awesome shot of them.
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#4 Rob Vuona SOC

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 08:19 PM

Hi fellow shooters!

This is my first post to the steadicam forum. I am new to the world of the Steadicam and have been following your extremely informative posts for the last half of the year. I thought it was high time I finally joined, so here I am!

I shoot with a HVX-200 and Glidecam setup. I'm hoping to graduate to the bigger boys (Tiffen+f900) in time.

I will be going on my first out of the country job next week to the Dominican Republic for a week long Fashion show and I was wondering if I could get some pointers from other globetrotting shooters?

Has anyone been to DR before? Are there any unspoken rules of the trade when working in an environment with unfamiliar customs?

I am still learning set etiquette. Is there anything I need to keep in mind when working with Fashion and other live events?

Sorry for being such a noob, but thanks in advance for your help!

~Noodlz


I'm not sure if the DR is a carnet country or not but either way you should check into it and have a full list of your gear and serial numbers for everything hat has a number on it.

Fly safe and be careful backstage, the models throw their clothes at you while their changing . . .LOL .. .
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#5 Kelli Lee

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 10:44 PM

Thanks for the all the advice. I'm going to make all the necessary calls tomorrow to get everything in order.

Thanks again!
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#6 Jess Haas SOC

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 11:41 PM

They have great rum there and it is dirt cheap. Be sure to drink some (but not too much) and bring some back for friends. I believe US customs let you bring two reasonably sized bottles back.

~Jess
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#7 Colin Donahue

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 12:55 PM

Jade, as Rob said, make a list of all your equipment, serial #'s, price, and country it was manufactured in. If there is a US Customs office in Atlanta, take this list and all your gear and travel info, show info etc. to the Customs office. Usually they do not make you bring the gear in to be inspected, but they will put an official stamp on your list of equipment. This may help you in the DR, but it is most important for getting your stuff back in the country through US Customs. I worked on a show where they made some back room deal(we litterally went into a back room and paid somebody off) to get my stuff into the Bahamas. It was the one time I did not get my list stamped at US Customs, and I could not get it back on the plane to leave the Bahamas. I had to have it air freighted to LAX and it sat for a week before I could get it. I got the show tol pay for the time my gear sat there because they claimed they had all of the shipping issues "taken care of".
Good Luck.

Colin Donahue
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