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#1 Michael Wilson

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 03:40 PM

When I am standing with the rig on how do I find the common center of gravity. That is my cg and that of the camera and sled in order to balance the rig without holding onto it.

I have gone through every variation of the threads and I feel as though as I am standing incorrectly. I can balance the rig from time to time yet can't sustain it consistently.

How should I stand in order to do this?

Stand with feet inbetween camera and body? Stand straight up?

thanks

michael
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#2 Jerry Holway

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 07:15 PM

Michael-

a bit of terminology will help, perhaps. It sounds like you are trying to find your proper "threads" so that the sled doesn't appear to fly away from or towards you as you stand up naturally.

(c.g. is another issue/concern, and if you weren't standing on the common c.g. of you and the sled, you'd fall over.)

Two possible issues: stand with the rig about 45 degrees off your hip (arm crossing your body) and pan the camera slightly across your body. (another way to think of this is your hips are turned slightly towards the sled.) You DO NOT want the sled at your side.

Assuming you have a typical rig/socket block connection, the "side to side" threads should be about 2 full turns out on the top and all the way in on the bottom.

If you have a big belly, wind the top "in and out" screw most of the way out. If you have a flat stomach, wind the top "in and out" screw a couple of turns shy of all the way in.

Then try it out with the correct stance relative to the rig. If it's close, just play around with it. If the rig wants to go violently away or towards you, change one set of threads a couple of turns at a time and test it again.

Good luck.

Jerry
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#3 Michael Wilson

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 11:12 PM

Standing at the 45 degree angle towards the sled helped. Now I can keep it balanced. It kind of moves around slightly but not violently. So is this position I should use while operating? Keeping my hips pointed towards the sled slightly? I haven't been able to pick this position out so much from the EFP video.


Can't wait for the book.

thanks for your help
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#4 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

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Posted 10 February 2009 - 12:50 AM

Standing at the 45 degree angle towards the sled helped. Now I can keep it balanced. It kind of moves around slightly but not violently. So is this position I should use while operating? Keeping my hips pointed towards the sled slightly? I haven't been able to pick this position out so much from the EFP video.


Can't wait for the book.



No you should be walking normally, hips straight ahead.

I think you should be looking into workshop. I'm not sure but if there is a slot open you should take the Lake Arrowhead workshop in March.
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#5 chris fawcett

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Posted 10 February 2009 - 07:43 AM

Hi Michael,

Like Eric says, take a workshop—that's the best advice you can get.

Meanwhile, bearing in mind what Jerry says, you'll find some basic tips here: http://steadivision.com/steadipos.html

Best wishes,

Chris
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#6 Jerry Holway

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Posted 10 February 2009 - 08:10 AM

Michael-

Since you have it, look carefully at the EFP DVD, especially the position of the rig next to the body. Ted's intro is good while he's walking, and the hips are turned in slightly towards the rig while walking, and this is right for him and for me, but perhaps not for Eric.

Without taking a workshop, it's hard to know how to take all these little tidbits of great and varied advice and put them in a context that works for you.

I'm hoping the EFP DVD and (later this month or week or so) the book will help with that broad understanding, so the specific questions and advice in this forum has a broader context, and you can better discover the proper place for the advice in your universe of experience.

Even clicking on the book icon to the right and then blowing up the cover image of Ruben Sluijter might help (alas the glidecam guy is holding the rig for the photo, not for operating, so there's an unnatural tension in the body, hips... not good).

So, again, good luck, take a workshop, watch the tape, read the book soon...

Jerry
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