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Flycam 6000


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#1 jef medici

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Posted 09 December 2008 - 11:48 AM

Hi I am film student and have bought the Flycam 6000 http://uk.youtube.co...h?v=vgZJLCcl-kg and now want to use a monitor for it same as these guys, I would like some advice on the following:

1) Best size? 3 /5 ?

2) Can I use any LCD monitor ?

3) What will the monitor have to have to connect to my XL2?

4) Will I need a battery pack ? if so where do i get one ?

Thanks in anticipation of your replies

Jef
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#2 Janice Arthur

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Posted 09 December 2008 - 01:12 PM

Jef;

You have asked a lot of broad questions.

The fact that you ask #3 (do I have to have to have the monitor connect to my XL1) shows you are
at the very beginning of the process. The homebuilt workshop will give you some help with all these things too.

We can throw in some things of help like monitor suggestions but you need to get your system, practice a while and at the same time start doing some research on your own.

Getting the answers here is not practical nor can the volumes of responses it would take be realistic.

We will gladly help you when you get some more basic knowledge under your belt.

Make friends with some operators, take a workshop, learn some things about machining.

Janice

If other want to help more specifically have at it.

I wish you well with your career as a operator.
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#3 Dave Gish

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Posted 09 December 2008 - 02:55 PM

Hi I am film student and have bought the Flycam 6000 http://uk.youtube.co...h?v=vgZJLCcl-kg and now want to use a monitor for it same as these guys, I would like some advice on the following:

1) Best size? 3 /5 ?

2) Can I use any LCD monitor ?

3) What will the monitor have to have to connect to my XL2?

4) Will I need a battery pack ? if so where do i get one ?

Thanks in anticipation of your replies

Jef

Hi Jef,

I'll try to answer your questions as best I can.

1) Best size is probably 5" to 7" diagonal.

2) You can use any monitor indoors. For outdoor shots, a very bright LCD with an anti-reflective coating works best. The number of nits is the important specification. The number of pixels doesn't matter as much for steadicam.

3) In general, you'll use composite video. The cables for this have the yellow RCA cable ends or BNC cable ends.

4) Yes, you will need a 12-volt power source. See below for details.

If you don't have much money, you can pick up a 7" LCD TV off of eBay for less than $100 shipped, like this:
http://cgi.ebay.com/...E:B:BCA:US:1123
Just make sure it has A/V inputs and a 12v DC power input. This won't be great outdoors, but if you make a hood out of plastic, cardboard, or coroplast, it should be usable.

For a cheap 12v battery, you can use 10 AA NiMH rechargeable batteries and a 10-AA battery holder like the one shown here:
http://www.oselectro...om/ose_p104.htm
(part number BH107). You'll also want a BH9V6 to connect to the holder. You can get 4 of each for around $21 shipped. These are the same battery holders used on the Steadicam Pilot-AA model, but since the Flycam 6000 doesn't have a 10-AA battery holder housing, you'll probably just have to gaff tape the battery pack to the bottom rear of the sled. You'll also need some electrical tape to make your own power cables.

You'll probably want to get a couple spare sets of 10 AA NiMH batteries and enough chargers to charge 10 at once. For example, you can buy 3 of these
http://thomasdistrib...uibrncr5pp3fr15
and 3 of these
http://thomasdistrib...uibrncr5pp3fr15
for around $180 shipped. Together with the battery holders, thats makes three 12v 2.6aH battery packs (enough for a full day's shoot) and a charger solution all for around $200.

You can also spend more and get a pro battery package, like this:
http://www.bhphotovi...7S_Starter.html
That's two 4.8aH batteries and charger for around $1000. In this case, you'll also need a v-lock plate.

Hope this helps.

Edited by Dave Gish, 09 December 2008 - 02:58 PM.

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#4 Michael Suchar

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Posted 10 December 2008 - 12:24 AM

Jeff, I have the same rig and have made a lot of mods which have improved the performance greatly. Here's a link to my post about the rig on another sight that you may find more useful as a new user. The sight is a great resource for new and experienced shooters.
You will need to create an account to see the photos.

http://hbsboard.com/...pic,3708.0.html

http://hbsboard.com/...pic,3702.0.html
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#5 jef medici

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Posted 10 December 2008 - 05:56 AM

Hi I am film student and have bought the Flycam 6000 http://uk.youtube.co...h?v=vgZJLCcl-kg and now want to use a monitor for it same as these guys, I would like some advice on the following:

1) Best size? 3 /5 ?

2) Can I use any LCD monitor ?

3) What will the monitor have to have to connect to my XL2?

4) Will I need a battery pack ? if so where do i get one ?

Thanks in anticipation of your replies

Jef

Hi Jef,

I'll try to answer your questions as best I can.

1) Best size is probably 5" to 7" diagonal.

2) You can use any monitor indoors. For outdoor shots, a very bright LCD with an anti-reflective coating works best. The number of nits is the important specification. The number of pixels doesn't matter as much for steadicam.

3) In general, you'll use composite video. The cables for this have the yellow RCA cable ends or BNC cable ends.

4) Yes, you will need a 12-volt power source. See below for details.

If you don't have much money, you can pick up a 7" LCD TV off of eBay for less than $100 shipped, like this:
http://cgi.ebay.com/...E:B:BCA:US:1123
Just make sure it has A/V inputs and a 12v DC power input. This won't be great outdoors, but if you make a hood out of plastic, cardboard, or coroplast, it should be usable.

For a cheap 12v battery, you can use 10 AA NiMH rechargeable batteries and a 10-AA battery holder like the one shown here:
http://www.oselectro...om/ose_p104.htm
(part number BH107). You'll also want a BH9V6 to connect to the holder. You can get 4 of each for around $21 shipped. These are the same battery holders used on the Steadicam Pilot-AA model, but since the Flycam 6000 doesn't have a 10-AA battery holder housing, you'll probably just have to gaff tape the battery pack to the bottom rear of the sled. You'll also need some electrical tape to make your own power cables.

You'll probably want to get a couple spare sets of 10 AA NiMH batteries and enough chargers to charge 10 at once. For example, you can buy 3 of these
http://thomasdistrib...uibrncr5pp3fr15
and 3 of these
http://thomasdistrib...uibrncr5pp3fr15
for around $180 shipped. Together with the battery holders, thats makes three 12v 2.6aH battery packs (enough for a full day's shoot) and a charger solution all for around $200.

You can also spend more and get a pro battery package, like this:
http://www.bhphotovi...7S_Starter.html
That's two 4.8aH batteries and charger for around $1000. In this case, you'll also need a v-lock plate.

Hope this helps.



Hi Dave

Thanks for such an elaborate and informative reply It has helped me a lot I will keep you posted on this and let you know my progress

Regards

Jef
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#6 jef medici

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Posted 10 December 2008 - 06:09 AM

Jeff, I have the same rig and have made a lot of mods which have improved the performance greatly. Here's a link to my post about the rig on another sight that you may find more useful as a new user. The sight is a great resource for new and experienced shooters.
You will need to create an account to see the photos.

http://hbsboard.com/...pic,3708.0.html

http://hbsboard.com/...pic,3702.0.html


Ok thanks Michael for the link I have registered and will take a look at your mods I will keep you posted on the issue and let you know how I get on

Regards

Jef :)
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#7 Nils Valkenborgh

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Posted 08 January 2009 - 03:41 PM

Hi Jef,

I recently bought the flycam aswell but with the proaim 7000 arm (Sled => Flycam 6000, is the same as yours)
Here's a link of my basic setup http://www.gripfruit...pola_steadi.jpg
it's a canon XL1s with a 4" monitor at the bottom (which i find too small, so i recommend
a 5-7" which you can find on ebay sub $100) at the bottom I've got a 12v battery which I diy-ed
to the monitor with some cables and an anderson plug. As you'll see there's a hole at the lower end
of the sled (to route cables through) at the top there's also a hole but it's covered up by a sticker, just poke
through, and be sure to use a video cable that's slim enough to go through both holes, that way you can
easily calibrate your dynamic balance without the videocable cluttering up the whole rig.

Congratulations with your purchase, you won't regret it :-)

Cheers, fellow Flycam owner Nils
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#8 Dave Gish

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Posted 09 January 2009 - 12:14 AM

Here's a link of my basic setup http://www.gripfruit...pola_steadi.jpg

Nils,

I helped someone set up a Flycam 6000, and that sticker on the sled post is worst idea I've ever seen. We peeled off the sticker, and then used lighter fluid to get rid of the sticker goo. Tar remover also works for this. Then rubbing alcohol gets rid of any traces of the lighter fluid or tar remover, and leaves the post perfectly clean.

The sticker is a big problem because you want the gimbal to be higher up on the sled post, closer to the bottom of the stage. This makes any movement on the sled less noticeable at the lens. But in order to move the gimbal up the post and keep a good drop time, you need to either take weight away from the bottom, add weight to the top, or perhaps a little of both.

On the bottom, you'll get better pan inertia if you put the bottom rods out as far as they will go. This will give you smoother pans.

Also, I'm not sure if you're just holding the sled out away from your body for the picture, but this position will wear out your back pretty fast. It's much easier and more stable to hold the sled post closer to your body, on your left side, with the battery just behind your left leg. You may have to rotate the angle that the gimbal comes off the arm to see the monitor.

Hope this helps.
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