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Adjusting Ride and Lift


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#1 Amelia Cutadean

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Posted 29 October 2008 - 03:15 PM

I just acquired a Steadicam Clipper and am having trouble adjusting the Ride and Lift appropriately. If I understand correctly, lift adjustment is based in the cameras weight and ride adjustment is like a shock absorber. What I am having trouble understanding is how these two work together. If my ride is adjusted to have a smoother less tenuous movement then does this effect how much tension is needed for the lift? I have adjusted my arm somewhat but it just doesn't seem right. This is the first time I have used a Steadicam in 10 years and that rig not only was mostly adjusted correctly at the beginning but also I don't think, didn't have the ride and lift adjustments available. Any suggestions?
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#2 Janice Arthur

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Posted 29 October 2008 - 04:32 PM

Amelia;

I am going to address your issues in one big issue; where should the arm sit when there is weight on it?

Ride and lift I can't separate.

That arm (Master Series group) is supposed to have the arm segments about horizontal when you have the rig on it.

So both sections should be adjusted to hold that Rig with and even tension.

You provide the "lift" when you operate with your right hand, which gives you lots of placement as to where the camera actually goes. Best example you boom with your right hand to find height of an actor and you only tilt a small amount.

"Smoothness" of the arm is a function of how well you operate it. You are just concerned with making it work "smoothly" with how you operate. Its not a function of a tension adjustment to make it smooth.

I hope this helps. I'm sure others will have good input too but as you get started that's a good place to begin your set ups.


(As is always said, take a workshop if you haven't.)
JA
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#3 Dave Gish

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Posted 29 October 2008 - 07:07 PM

From the manual:
To set the ride control for the maximum iso-elasticity:
? Set the arm to carry the sled?s weight
? Be sure to stand in proper form
? Boom the arm section all the way up to adjust the ride control
? Unscrew the ride control knob a few turnsat a time and test by booming up and down.
? At some point, the arm section will begin to lock up as you boom up. When it does, screw the ride control knob back in a couple of turns. Repeat for the other arm section.
? If you change the weight of the rig significantly, change the ride control. A heavier rig needs more ?iso? and a lighter rig needs less ?iso.?

Have you done this procedure?

Edited by Dave Gish, 29 October 2008 - 07:08 PM.

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#4 Philip J. Martinez SOC

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Posted 29 October 2008 - 08:58 PM

I have the G-50 arm. I have my ride all the way (in or out I cant remember) so the arm is smooth through out the range of the boom. I do not like the springy feel I get when the ride is dialed in. I do not change the ride at all. I go from really light DV (with a weight) to maxed out HD or 35film jobs and only adjust the lift. I like the bones of my arm just a little up from horizontal.

Edited by Philip J. Martinez, 29 October 2008 - 09:00 PM.

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#5 Dave Gish

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Posted 29 October 2008 - 09:39 PM

I have the G-50 arm. I have my ride all the way (in or out I cant remember) so the arm is smooth through out the range of the boom. I do not like the springy feel I get when the ride is dialed in. I do not change the ride at all. I go from really light DV (with a weight) to maxed out HD or 35film jobs and only adjust the lift. I like the bones of my arm just a little up from horizontal.

Ever need someone to help lug your stuff around?
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#6 Amelia Cutadean

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Posted 30 October 2008 - 10:02 AM

From the manual:
To set the ride control for the maximum iso-elasticity:
? Set the arm to carry the sled?s weight
? Be sure to stand in proper form
? Boom the arm section all the way up to adjust the ride control
? Unscrew the ride control knob a few turnsat a time and test by booming up and down.
? At some point, the arm section will begin to lock up as you boom up. When it does, screw the ride control knob back in a couple of turns. Repeat for the other arm section.
? If you change the weight of the rig significantly, change the ride control. A heavier rig needs more ?iso? and a lighter rig needs less ?iso.?

Have you done this procedure?


I have done what the manual says, it's just not perfect yet and I was wondering if there were any suggestions from those who have done this before.
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#7 Amelia Cutadean

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Posted 30 October 2008 - 10:06 AM

I really appreciate the responses. They have been helpful. I am going to try some more adjustments this morning!
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#8 Amelia Cutadean

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Posted 30 October 2008 - 10:08 AM

I have the G-50 arm. I have my ride all the way (in or out I cant remember) so the arm is smooth through out the range of the boom. I do not like the springy feel I get when the ride is dialed in. I do not change the ride at all. I go from really light DV (with a weight) to maxed out HD or 35film jobs and only adjust the lift. I like the bones of my arm just a little up from horizontal.



Thanks for the reply. I think your response had been by far the most helpful.
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#9 Richard James Lewis

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Posted 30 October 2008 - 10:22 AM

I have the G-50 arm. I have my ride all the way (in or out I cant remember) so the arm is smooth through out the range of the boom. I do not like the springy feel I get when the ride is dialed in. I do not change the ride at all. I go from really light DV (with a weight) to maxed out HD or 35film jobs and only adjust the lift. I like the bones of my arm just a little up from horizontal.



Thanks for the reply. I think your response had been by far the most helpful.


I have it set to feel fairly ISO. I have found tho, if you fly something very light (not usually the case) with all the ISO all in, then it affects the performance of the arm, so best to back it off a bit. Normally for the majority of my work, I leave it alone.

Make sure that when adjusting lift, the arm sections pass each other when the two sections are horizontal, and not at an angle...if that makes sense. Once they do, add a turn more of lift so they both sit just above the horizon.

Rick.
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#10 JamieSilverstein

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Posted 30 October 2008 - 10:40 AM

Amelia;
I owned a Masters arm for several years and I just recently got a G70. What I usually do is put the ride almost to zero on both joints. I balance the lift to where both joints are at a 10 degree angle upwards. I test the arm to see that the joints are in synch with each other, or balanced. I then remove the sled and adjust the ride to what I think will be appropriate for the particular shot (slow walk-almost no ride, vehicle mount- heavy ride). I then put the sled back on the arm and adjust the lift again, making sure that the joints are where I want them to be.
I hope this helps.
Jamie
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#11 Jerry Holway

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Posted 30 October 2008 - 03:01 PM

Amelia- as the guy who wrote the instructions... I'll try to be more clear.

"Lift" controls how much weight the arm carries, and should normally be set so the arm sections hang slightly above level - 5 to 10 degrees or so, but it's not critical with a G-type arm. Similar controls exist in all arms, and how they are set depends on the arm.

"Ride" is the new control/feature, and it determines how "iso-elastic" your ride can be.

The two interact somewhat - changing the ride knob a lot does affect lift a little bit.

What you want is both sections tracking together/working together as you boom up and down (most important!), and with the least amount of effort, and without "going over centers" or "locking up."

The key thing is to have the screw controlled by the ride knob showing a lot of threads - as many as you can, really - for the weight you are carrying. A bigger weight should have more threads showing for the same "iso-elastic response."

With the ride knob you control how strongly the arm seeks the center - or put another way, how much effort is required to boom up or down, or put another way, how "reactive" the arm is. Less iso = strongly seeking the float point, lots of effort, very reactive (not good for most operating). More iso = does not seek the float point strongly (softer ride), less effort, less reactive (easier to keep at one height).

As the instructions say, dial the ride control for more and more iso (more threads showing) until the arm locks up booming all the way up and down, then dial it back in a few turns. With a heavier camera, you may never have too much iso, so just leave it dailed all the way out.

Try it both ways; all the way in or out, and compare the response.

Jerry
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#12 Amelia Cutadean

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Posted 31 October 2008 - 04:10 PM

Amelia- as the guy who wrote the instructions... I'll try to be more clear.

"Lift" controls how much weight the arm carries, and should normally be set so the arm sections hang slightly above level - 5 to 10 degrees or so, but it's not critical with a G-type arm. Similar controls exist in all arms, and how they are set depends on the arm.

"Ride" is the new control/feature, and it determines how "iso-elastic" your ride can be.

The two interact somewhat - changing the ride knob a lot does affect lift a little bit.

What you want is both sections tracking together/working together as you boom up and down (most important!), and with the least amount of effort, and without "going over centers" or "locking up."

The key thing is to have the screw controlled by the ride knob showing a lot of threads - as many as you can, really - for the weight you are carrying. A bigger weight should have more threads showing for the same "iso-elastic response."

With the ride knob you control how strongly the arm seeks the center - or put another way, how much effort is required to boom up or down, or put another way, how "reactive" the arm is. Less iso = strongly seeking the float point, lots of effort, very reactive (not good for most operating). More iso = does not seek the float point strongly (softer ride), less effort, less reactive (easier to keep at one height).

As the instructions say, dial the ride control for more and more iso (more threads showing) until the arm locks up booming all the way up and down, then dial it back in a few turns. With a heavier camera, you may never have too much iso, so just leave it dailed all the way out.

Try it both ways; all the way in or out, and compare the response.

Jerry



I really appreciate your response. Your further descriptions of the instructions have helped me understand how each of these works independently of each other and yet with one another. Thank you!

Amelia Cutadean
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