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operating grip


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8 replies to this topic

Poll: Which way to you operate? (38 member(s) have cast votes)

Which way to you operate?

  1. With two fingers on the gimbal, like at the workshops. (22 votes [57.89%])

    Percentage of vote: 57.89%

  2. With your whole hand grabbin' that gimbal. (12 votes [31.58%])

    Percentage of vote: 31.58%

  3. Or by blowing on the rig and hoping it goes where you want. (4 votes [10.53%])

    Percentage of vote: 10.53%

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#1 JakePollock

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Posted 21 July 2004 - 12:24 AM

been noticing on the forum that some dudes are operating with their whole hand on the gimbal, which is different than what we're taught at the workshops. some have mentioned having better control. also noticed on some "behind the scenes" sequences, other ops doing the same thing, so i thought i'd start this poll.

would also be curious to know, for those who operate full-fisted, do you find it difficult to maintain that "light" touch that you get with the two-fingered technique?

and for those who operate with two-fingers on the gimbal, do you find difficulty with vehicle mounts or other higher-than-normal-inertial situations? what about whip pans and mega-tilts?

thanks to those who respond.

jake pollock
taipei, taiwan
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#2 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

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Posted 21 July 2004 - 12:54 AM

Even though I have my whole hand around the post I still have a light touch. It's all about what you get used too with the rig. I also operate with a near Infinite drop time (Neutral)
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#3 PaulSommers

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Posted 21 July 2004 - 03:40 AM

I did a running shot tonight that started in don Juan. We raced down an alley and came to a turn, whip pan as the actor passed me in the corner, then I chased the actor to another turn and he runs up to a door. I started the shot in light touch mode. After the whip I went into full fist.

Whatever works for the shot.

At the workshops a great deal of information is given very succinctly. Low-mode is a pain, DJ is harder but an essential skill, light touch... I still think about all the things that were said at my workshop. When you are operating it's about what makes you comfortable and allows you to get the shot.

Paul
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#4 guillermo nespolo

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Posted 21 July 2004 - 08:38 AM

two fingenrs all the way (no sexual related) but in hard mount with antlers on very fast run whole hand but with a light touch
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#5 ChadPersons

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Posted 21 July 2004 - 02:05 PM

I like to use a light touch with all five finger tips but no palm. When I need a little extra control I might spread my index and pinky fingers to gain leverage. If by spreading those fingers you feel that the base of the rig gets a little loose I drop my thumb a bit to center it between the index and pinky and find very good control, especially over horizon.

My girlfriend just read my post from over my shoulder and though I was writing something perverted. :o

All the Best,

Chad Persons

P.S. Hey Paul... Good to see you posting though I had to look up "succinctly" in the dictionary. <_<
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#6 Howard J Smith

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Posted 21 July 2004 - 06:17 PM

I find if I am inside or on a stage I use a finger tip control and a slower drop time. Outside (I live in the UK - windy!) I go for a fuller grip with a quicker drop time (1 second faster) -
I hold the gimbal lightly in my palm with my fingers wrapping the post in such a way that I have subtle control - but I can grab it in a split second if the wind catches it or the shot needs it.
There is no grip for all shots - as Paul said even during the shot you change your grip.
Next time you are shooting try playing with grips and drop times when you rehearse and you will see the difference.

have fun

Howard
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#7 ChadPersons

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Posted 21 July 2004 - 06:22 PM

Hey Howard,

Regarding drop time I often adjust it for the shot being most specific when I'm making lateral moves(tracking someone in profile). I find that there is a sweet spot in the drop time so that when you start and stop the rig won't kick out on you whether you have a tight grip or not. What do you think? Do you put special thought into lateral moves?

Chad
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#8 Howard J Smith

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Posted 21 July 2004 - 06:45 PM

Hi Chad

If the shot is only that (tracking in profile) then I go with the longer drop (If you are closer to neutral then you do not have the pendulum effect ) - but if it is part of a shot, then I just use my body more and push the sled by slightly leaning into the direction I want it to go and use a very light grip - I hope this makes sense?

Take care

Howard
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#9 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

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Posted 21 July 2004 - 09:11 PM

If you are closer to neutral then you do not have the pendulum effect

I just did a day of insert car work and being neutral makes it SO easy, the rig never has a mind of it's own, it just stays put.
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