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LA Earthquake


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#1 David Shawl SOC

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Posted 29 July 2008 - 07:33 PM

So for some reason, while I was shooting in Rancho Palos Verdes at Trump's Golf Course today, no one there felt a quake. I didn't even know it happened until about an hour afterwards. I've never felt a quake and I kinda wish I was at home to check out the rumble!

What did you guys feel?
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#2 Rob Vuona SOC

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Posted 29 July 2008 - 08:43 PM

So for some reason, while I was shooting in Rancho Palos Verdes at Trump's Golf Course today, no one there felt a quake. I didn't even know it happened until about an hour afterwards. I've never felt a quake and I kinda wish I was at home to check out the rumble!

What did you guys feel?

on the set over at CBS , all of us cameras bailed outside, yes i grabbed my computer, but the audience all stayed in their seats.......lol....

shake rattle and role.....
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#3 David Shawl SOC

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Posted 29 July 2008 - 10:02 PM

They probably thought it was part of the show and stayed calm!
I hope no one got hurt today, stay safe everyone
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#4 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

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Posted 29 July 2008 - 11:13 PM

We were on Stage 15 at Sunset Gower and we got shook pretty hard. The Stage floor rolled in waves for a few seconds and that shook the hell out of the set and greenbeds.

The cast and crew got out and waited for the electrics to check the lights then we went right back to work.
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#5 Robert Starling SOC

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Posted 29 July 2008 - 11:45 PM

I was on the top / 5th floor of a building in downtown Burbank and it had the furniture rocking and my Steadicart rocking pretty good. It's only my second earthquake ever that was substantial enough to feel and move things like that. The building is only about a year old so I would think it is built to proper standards but it still swayed some afterward. By the time I figured out what was going on and that I needed to do something it was over.
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#6 Charles Papert

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Posted 30 July 2008 - 12:22 AM

So what I want to know as (and I don't really know why I want to know this, guess I'm just curious)...was anyone in the rig when it happened? and what was THAT like?!
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#7 David Shawl SOC

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Posted 30 July 2008 - 02:20 AM

Charles, It would have probably been a good day to be shooting with gyros!
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#8 Niall Chadwick

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Posted 30 July 2008 - 05:29 AM

Charles, It would have probably been a good day to be shooting with gyros!


Well a colleague of mine was in LA and experienced this quake at his hotel.

Being a Brit, it was new in his experience, but the terror of the moment was summed up in a single sentence.

"It was a serious brown trouser moment"

Can only image what it must be like. Hope everyone is ok.
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#9 JimBartell

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Posted 30 July 2008 - 12:23 PM

I was at home and the house did a boogaloo for about 30 seconds. After 28 years in LA this was the first time I got under the dining room table. Once the initial "What the f...?." wears of and you realize it isn't stopping you start trying to remember what the latest recommendation on what to do is. Door frames? No, might get hit by door. Outside? Might get hit by falling glass. Screw it, get under something solid.

Our neighborhood is built on landfill so it gets really queasy when the land moves. Fortunately no damage, other than me reputation in my dog's eyes.

Jim "Move over Rover" Bartell
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#10 David Allen Grove

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Posted 30 July 2008 - 12:51 PM

There were a couple of strong jolts.. and then rolling.

I hate the sound of the building makes when a quake hits. ug.

I grabbed the munchkin and went and sat in the short hallway in my townhouse.

This is like the 9th or so noticable quake I've felt since I moved here in 2000.

This was the worst one to date.

I can't imagine what the 94 quake was like and at 4:30am?

My townhouse manager said this was very tame in comparison. YIKES.

Anyone remember the 94 quake? What was your experience?
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#11 Rob Vuona SOC

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Posted 30 July 2008 - 01:35 PM

So what I want to know as (and I don't really know why I want to know this, guess I'm just curious)...was anyone in the rig when it happened? and what was THAT like?!

Charles,
funny you ask, I said that to my AC . . . ."I wish I was in my rig, just to see what it would have felt like" I had just taken it off after rehearsal, but I would have ran out of the stage wearing it tethered and all . . .LOL . . .

for all you first timers . . . .welcome to California . . . .

I still prefer it here on this coast over the East Coast, Blaagth to the Hurricane season

at least we don't have an Earthquake season and they only last 5-10 seconds
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#12 Kris Torch Wilson

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Posted 30 July 2008 - 03:03 PM

The mrs and i have a deal now that whenever we feel an earthquake we run to the bedroom and jump in bed just in case it's the end of the world. the problem was her mother was there too!

and she's not so hot.

Torch
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#13 Cedric Martin

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Posted 30 July 2008 - 03:10 PM

So what I want to know as (and I don't really know why I want to know this, guess I'm just curious)...was anyone in the rig when it happened? and what was THAT like?!


It's a pretty funny feeling to have the rig on when it's shakin'... but it didn't last quite long enough to really enjoy the ride. I was able to keep my balance. The rig was just adding an extra challenge. Where I was at the time (Malibu, outside on a deck), I just felt a couple waves under my feet and by the time I realized what happened the quake was over. It was my first earthquake ever, so I imagine it's how you feel when it happens for the first time. I wouldn't wish to experience that again on a bigger scale though.

The interesting part of the story, which I haven't been able to solve yet, is that my Preston and TB-6 were acting weird 10 minutes before and 10 minutes after, and then came back to normal. The DP said that it could be related to the electro-magnetism released during the earthquake...
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#14 Reid Russell

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Posted 30 July 2008 - 06:29 PM

I was at home and the house did a boogaloo for about 30 seconds. After 28 years in LA this was the first time I got under the dining room table. Once the initial "What the f...?." wears of and you realize it isn't stopping you start trying to remember what the latest recommendation on what to do is. Door frames? No, might get hit by door. Outside? Might get hit by falling glass. Screw it, get under something solid.

Our neighborhood is built on landfill so it gets really queasy when the land moves. Fortunately no damage, other than me reputation in my dog's eyes.

Jim "Move over Rover" Bartell


I was outside in Reseda Park. A few of us were leaning on a camera cart when it started shaking. It felt stronger when I was standing still and I even felt a little seasick. The light poles and basketball hoops were swaying pretty hard but that was all.

Actually the best thing to do if your inside is to get next to something solid and lie on the floor. If your in bed roll over onto the floor and stay next to it in a fetal position. Check this out:

EXTRACT FROM DOUG COPP'S ARTICLE ON THE 'TRIANGLE OF LIFE.'
My name is Doug Copp. I am the Rescue Chief and Disaster Manager of the American Rescue Team International (ARTI), the world's most experienced rescue team. The information in this article will save lives in an
earthquake.
I have crawled inside 875 collapsed buildings, worked with rescue teams from 60 countries, founded rescue teams in several countries, and I am a member of many rescue teams from many countries.
I was the United Nations expert in Disaster Mitigation for two years. I have worked at every major disaster in the world since 1985, except for simultaneous disasters.
The first building I ever crawled inside of was a school in Mexico City during the 1985 earthquake. Every child was under its desk. Every child was crushed to the thickness of their bones. They could have survived by lying down next to their desks in the aisles. It was obscene,
unnecessary, and I wondered why the children were not in the aisles. I didn't at the time know that the children were told to hide under something.
Simply stated, when buildings collapse, the weight of the ceilings
falling upon the objects or furniture inside crushes these objects,
leaving a space or void next to them. This space is what I call the 'triangle of life'. The larger the object, the stronger, the less it will compact. The less the object compacts, the larger the void, the greater the probability that the person who is using this void for safety will not be injured. The next time you watch collapsed buildings, on television, count the 'triangles' you see formed. They are everywhere. It is the most common shape you will see
in a collapsed building.
TIPS FOR EARTHQUAKE SAFETY
1) Almost all who simply 'duck and cover' WHEN BUILDINGS COLLAPSE
are crushed to death. People who get under objects, like desks or cars, are crushed.
2) Cats, dogs, and babies often naturally curl up in the fetal
position. You should too in an earthquake. It is a natural
safety/survival instinct. You can survive in a smaller void. Get next to an object, next to a sofa, next to a large bulky object that will
compress slightly but leave a void next to it.
3) Wooden buildings are the safest type of construction to be in
during an earthquake. Wood is flexible and moves with the force of the
earthquake. If the wooden building does collapse, large survival voids
are created. Also, the wooden building has less concentrated, crushing
weight. Brick buildings will break into individual bricks. Bricks will
cause many injuries but less squashed bodies than concrete slabs.
4) If you are in bed during the night and an earthquake occurs, simply
roll off the bed. A safe void will exist around the bed. Hotels can
achieve a much greater survival rate in earthquakes simply by posting a sign on the back of the door of every room, telling occupants to lie
down on the floor, next to the bottom of the bed during an earthquake.
5) If an earthquake happens and you cannot easily escape by getting
out the door or window, then lie down and curl up in the fetal position next to a sofa or large chair.
6) Most everyone who gets under a doorway when buildings collapse is
killed. How? If you stand under a doorway and the doorjamb falls
forward or backward you will be crushed by the ceiling above. If the
door jam falls sideways you will be cut in half by the doorway. In
either case, you will be killed!
7) Never go to the stairs. The stairs have a different 'moment of
frequency' (they swing separately from the main part of the building).
The stairs and remainder of the building continuously bump into each
other until structural failure of the stairs takes place. The people
who get on stairs before they fail are chopped up by the stair treads - horribly mutilated. Even if the building doesn't collapse, stay away
from the stairs. The stairs are a likely part of the building to be
damaged. Even if the stairs are not collapsed by the earthquake, they
may collapse later when overloaded by fleeing people. They should
always be checked for safety, even when the rest of the building is not damaged.
8) Get Near the Outer Walls of Buildings or Outside of Them. If
Possible, it is much better to be near the outside of the building
rather than the interior. The farther inside you are from the outside
perimeter of the building, the greater the probability that your escape route will be blocked.
9) People inside their vehicles are crushed when the road above
falls in an earthquake and crushes their vehicles, which is exactly what happened with the slabs between the decks of the Nimitz Freeway. The victims of the San Francisco earthquake all stayed inside their
vehicles. They were all killed. They could have easily survived by
getting out and sitting or lying next to their vehicles. Everyone
killed would have survived if they had been able to get out of their
cars and sit or lie next to them. All the crushed cars had voids 3 feet high next to them, except for the cars that had columns fall directly
across them.
10) I discovered, while crawling inside of collapsed newspaper offices
and other offices with a lot of paper that paper does not compact.
Large voids are found surrounding stacks of paper.

Spread the word and save someone's life.
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#15 Alec Jarnagin SOC

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Posted 30 July 2008 - 08:50 PM

Kris, I couldn't resist - I googled your rather unique name and the first hit was a post on this forum (something about sweating like a pig). Point being - I hope none of your family members Google your name in a few weeks from now else you'll have some explaining to do regarding your "not so hot" Mother-in-Law!

Cedric, you should let Howard know about your findings - probably a lot more money in predicting earthquakes.

Jim, I've met both your dining-room table and your dog. Not sure what that means..... Glad you're okay though.

Rob, you're the first person I've ever heard of that prefers the West Coast (okay guys, don't start - let us poor saps that endure countless days of nasty weather believe....)

Glad everyone is OK.
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