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Where around Pittsburgh, PA can I try a steadicam?


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#1 Marco Giordani

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Posted 22 July 2008 - 02:53 PM

Hi,

Obviously I am a newbie and very glad I found you guys!
I shoot with a Sony PD 150 MiniDV--with NP-F960 batterie--ME66 shotgun mic with shock mount. (Total weight maybe about 5 pounds.)

I am interested in a pilot or flyer. I don't know which one?
I am small framed,(5'8" 150lbs) so I think I would need the compact vest?

Does anyone know if their is a convention or place around the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania area where I could actually go and try one of these?

Thanks
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#2 Dave Gish

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Posted 22 July 2008 - 03:05 PM

The Steadicam Pilot goes up to 10 pounds and the vest will adjust to anyone.

More info here:

http://www.youtube.c...;watch_response
http://dvinfo.net/ar...dicampilot1.php
http://avid.blogs.co..._scad_test.html
http://www.dvinfo.ne...ad.php?t=115235
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#3 Dave Gish

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Posted 23 July 2008 - 07:13 AM

Also see here:
http://www.macvideo....rticleid=100761

By the way, the best way to try out the Flyer and Pilot is by taking a 2-day workshop. They provide both rigs for you to learn on. If you've never used a Steadicam before, then any rig is going to feel strange.

I don't know if there's going to be a 2-day workshop anywhere near Pittsburgh, but here is the workshop site.
http://www.thesteadicamworkshops.com/
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#4 Marco Giordani

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Posted 23 July 2008 - 07:26 AM

Also see here:
http://www.macvideo....rticleid=100761

By the way, the best way to try out the Flyer and Pilot is by taking a 2-day workshop. They provide both rigs for you to learn on. If you've never used a Steadicam before, then any rig is going to feel strange.

I don't know if there's going to be a 2-day workshop anywhere near Pittsburgh, but here is the workshop site.
http://www.thesteadicamworkshops.com/



Thank you very much Dave. I really hope I could get my hands on one in the near future.
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#5 Marco Giordani

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Posted 23 July 2008 - 07:28 AM

Sorry I am not sure how to use the forum yet.

Thanks for all the help Dave. Which one do you have and are you content with it?

-marco
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#6 Dave Gish

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Posted 23 July 2008 - 09:04 AM

Which one do you have and are you content with it?

I have the Pilot and am very content with it. It does take a while to learn though, like any steadicam.

I also used the Flyer in the 2-day workshop and it felt pretty similar to the Pilot with additional weights. The big advantage of the Flyer is that it can lift cameras + accessories up to 19 pounds.

This is particularly important if you are using a 35mm lens adapter with the Panasonic HVX200 or Sony EX1. The weight of these cameras plus the lens adapter, 35mm lens, matte box, and rods to hold it all together will put you over the 10 pound weight limit of the Pilot.

The lens adapter provides a really shallow DOF that looks like film, allowing you really focus the viewer on a particular person or part of the frame. Given that these cameras aim to mimic film in every other way (24p, cine-gamma, variable frame rates, etc.), the last missing part is the shallow DOF. So lens adapters are becoming quite popular.

However, a shallow DOF on a steadicam requires a costly wireless focus control system, a really good wireless video system for monitoring, a reference monitor on set, and a dedicated assistant camera person to constantly pull focus. Since steadicam tends to focus the viewers attention by movement, it's not clear that the lens adapter is required for the steadicam shots. This seems to be a hot topic of debate for ultra-low budget and student film projects, so there's no clear answer here.

But if you are doing event videography, there is no question in my mind - the Pilot is what you want. Lens adapters are not required here.

If you are interested in investing in the Pilot (both money and time for training), then be sure to check out all the links I've included in this thread.
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