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specific balance for dual arm setup


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#1 Johnny Tsang

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Posted 14 June 2008 - 09:52 PM

so I want to know what is the right adjustment balance for a dual arm spring setup? Where should it stop at when I mount the sled on it?
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#2 Rob Vuona SOC

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Posted 14 June 2008 - 10:01 PM

so I want to know what is the right adjustment balance for a dual arm spring setup? Where should it stop at when I mount the sled on it?



You need a good dose of Peter Abraham and his workshop, LOL . . . . . but until then If I am getting what your saying . . . .

You have a two elbow arm and where should the rig be once you have the weight of the camera on it? Correct ?

I fly mine Neutral . . . .so that both elbows are horozontal . . . .LOL . . .

Hope that helps , There's definitely more to it, but I'm sure you know that, but that's the quick simple answer

Remember . . . . .Peter Abraham . . . .Workshop . . .

Fly Safe
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#3 Jerry Holway

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Posted 15 June 2008 - 10:18 AM

In a workshop you will discover that different designs of arms (3a/3 spring types, Master, G-series, PRO, etc.) have specific points where they float near the middle (horizontal arm links) but require almost equal force to boom all the way up or down.

More importantly, the shot itself dictates how the arm links should be adjusted. For instance, if you are always working near the top of the range, you might adjust the arm higher than normal - with consequences for booming to the opposite end of the range.

In all cases, you want both arm sections to work together, so balance the forearm section (closest to the sled) first, and balance the upper (other) section to track with the forearm section as you boom fully up and down.

Posture affects arm performance as well. So does using a "back mounted" vest. Workshop workshop workshop. No simple answers.

Jerry
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#4 Matteo Quagliano

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 04:34 AM

I'm normally keeping the sled section of the arm a little leaning to the ground with the other section (close to the body) almost horizontal... Am I doing something wrong? I do that after watching hundreds of pictures on the net, since I dind't have yet the opportunity to take a workshop...


cheers,
matt
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#5 Jerry Holway

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 09:05 AM

Again, in all cases, the two sections of the arm should work together. They should both start booming up or down at the same time, both from the "center" and from the extremes.

If they don't track together, there will be a bump somewhere in the middle of the travel - not a good thing.

I suggest you START with both arm sections slightly DOWN from horizontal IF it is a 3a type /3 spring arm. Slightly UP from horizontal if it is a MasterSeries, Flyer, Ultra, or G-series arm. PRO? not sure - and I'd like to know.

Again, the shot itself should determine how the arm is tuned.

Jerry
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