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Camera Image Stabilizer


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#1 Jim Birney

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Posted 10 May 2008 - 11:29 PM

I have a merlin, no vest yet and a CanonGL2 with image stabilization. I mainly create Home video tours walking through the entire home panning and tilting. I edit on Final Cut Studio 2. I also create videos for the fire academy going into homes they are burning to train recruits (great fun). My question is should the image stabilizer be turned off or left on for best results.
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#2 Mike McGowan SOC

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Posted 11 May 2008 - 12:05 AM

Off. On will occasionally make a 'correction' you didn't want to make. The steadicam, even operated with medium skill, will do a much better job than the stabilizer.

Fire department training video sounds cool as hell. Do you get to wear a fire proof suit?

mm.
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#3 Jim Birney

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Posted 11 May 2008 - 08:47 AM

Off. On will occasionally make a 'correction' you didn't want to make. The steadicam, even operated with medium skill, will do a much better job than the stabilizer.

Fire department training video sounds cool as hell. Do you get to wear a fire proof suit?

mm.


Mike,
I worked for a fire dept for ten years as a paramedic/ firefighter. I had to quit because of Post traumatic stress disorder ( too many trauma calls) so I went back to school full time studying cinematography and editing, I found a passion for the steadicam and I hope to go to the 6 day workshop in PA. When I was in The Marines I was an expert rifleman and I attribute that skill to helping me with the steadicam. Not to babble but at school they also have a fire academy and when they found out I used to be a firefighter they let me wear the turnout gear and go into the rooms they set ablaze and shoot from only a few feet away. I get some really good footage being in the same room. Thus comes about my future company name Extreme Video Productions. Thanks for the reply.
Jim Birney

Edited by Jim Birney, 11 May 2008 - 08:48 AM.

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#4 Alec Jarnagin SOC

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Posted 11 May 2008 - 10:22 AM

"Do you get to wear a fire proof suit?"

Trust me, they are a pain in the ass to shoot in, but at times more than necessary!
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#5 Charles Papert

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Posted 11 May 2008 - 11:05 AM

I was just testing a lightweight rig with a camcorder and was a little baffled by the delay I was seeing, then realized the optical stabilizer was on. It doesn't seem to be that noticeable when you are shooting handheld but it's confusing with fast pans (especially telephoto) with a rig. I suppose if you have to do a straight-ahead running shot and the rig has vibration problems the stabilization might help with those but overall, it's best to leave it off.
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#6 Jim Birney

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Posted 11 May 2008 - 02:40 PM

"Do you get to wear a fire proof suit?"

Trust me, they are a pain in the ass to shoot in, but at times more than necessary!


I wear firefighter turn out gear without the SCBA/airmask & tank and without gloves. The reason being for no Scba is I need to be able to see better and the reason for no gloves is I need to know when the camera is getting too hot being so close to the fire, if my hands are getting to hot then I bail out of the room. I also lay down or crawl to get the shot under the smoke. I do have a helmet cam which handles more heat but there is no screen to see what you are shooting and it's not very stable.
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#7 Danny O'Neill

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Posted 13 May 2008 - 04:01 PM

Ive only had my Glidecam for a few days but have been playing with it non stop.

I found when moving around its best to have steadyshot off as it trys to correct you and you end up over compensating for it. This leads to your guiding hand trying to guide the camera and the image stabalizer.

HOwever I found if your standing still trying to get a steady and almost tripod like shot then i turn it on and its much more stable as im not trying to do any corrections, just standing and breathing. I have assigned one of the hotkeys on my FX1 to be steadyshot on and off.

If your learning like me then learn with it off. If you learn with it on you will end up getting used to compensating for the stabilizer.
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