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the arm the Mr Garrett for Industrial


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#1 luis castro

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Posted 05 April 2008 - 08:08 AM

zeroG? Technology

Introducing the revolutionary new technology that protects workers from the destructive force of gravity.
The zeroG? arm utilizes patented technology that allows workers to maneuver tools, parts and even their own arm as if weightless, but with astounding freedom of motion. zeroG is now available as a powerful new tool to help reduce injuries, dramatically decreasing injury-related risks and costs, while increasing productivity in the workplace.

Review an independent ergonomics report on the benefits of zeroG?


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The comprehensive zeroG System ? utilizing patented arm, gimbal and mount technology components ? allows workers to maneuver tools precisely while protecting against ergonomic injuries and related costs. More information

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Now available, the zeroG4 holds tools and parts weighing up to 36 lbs or more and renders them near-weightless with full range of motion.
More information
Available soon, the zeroG2 is capable of supporting lighter tools as well as the human arm, alone or with light implements.
This zeroG arm is ideal for smaller payloads and related worker activities.



http://www.equipoisinc.com/






I like the docking bracket from the wall

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#2 Erwin Landau

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Posted 20 April 2008 - 05:59 PM

It was posted somewhere before, but just for the sake of archiving...


http://www.youtube.c...feature=related
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#3 JobScholtze

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 03:32 AM

I cant help myself to wonder how it will last in the "dirty" industry? I mean dust, sand, irion and other metal scrapes. Can the arm keep up with all that? If so, i need to get one for beach shoots :P
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#4 David Hughes

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 05:08 AM

Will this mean that Steadicam technology will be mass produced and we will finally be able to access economies of scale?
Will the G50 be half the price in a few years time?

Edited by David Hughes, 21 April 2008 - 05:09 AM.

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#5 Mike Marriage

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 03:16 PM

Are these arms build to the same standard as the Steadicam G range?

If so, I hope David is right!
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#6 Richard James Lewis

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 06:44 PM

I'd rather like to keep the value in my multi thousand pound investment...
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#7 Alec Jarnagin SOC

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 06:48 PM

Guys,

I seriously doubt the arms will be the same. Titanium springs with load and ride adjustments seem a bit much for that industry. Also, I'd imagine that the arm ends (both socket block and post end) would be different. In short, I imagine they will be cheaper versions but not enough cheaper to justify buying and modifying for our use.

Complete conjecture on my part.
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#8 Janice Arthur

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 08:11 PM

Hi all;

Be careful what you wish for. . .

If all this stuff becomes "too cheap" it'll be everywhere and suddenly rental rates will tank and competition will be through the roof.

One of the realities of Steadicam is that because its expensive you get to enter a small community and also get to charge a lot.

While the price of admission is high on the high end gear the pay off period can be relatively short depending on work.

Having personally spent six figures on gear I know both sides really well but I have recently realized how "cheap" this is for a small business.

Think of a McDonald's franchise or farmer who buys many six figure machines or basically any body else in business.
Just spit balling here but it is something I've been reexamining lately.

Janice

Edited by Janice Arthur, 21 April 2008 - 08:14 PM.

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#9 David Hughes

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Posted 22 April 2008 - 07:09 AM

I shall now indulge in a bit of conjecture as well. Why would you put cheaper springs or components in an arm that is designed to hold heavy tools with sharp blades spinning at high rpm? The last thing you would want in these circumstances would be a spring failure right? and like Job says as these arms will be subjected to workshop dirt grit and abuse by clumsy people on production lines dropping them. You would surely make them out of the best quality you could to keep your legal insurance premiums down. Sure would need a pin block obviously and a post on the top end but these are the cheeper bits compared to the rest of the engineering involved. Maybe this development will help evolve the g series to a bullet proof level of reliability and imperviousness eventually turning it into the ultimate arm for all weather and locations!
Sorry Rick but everything depreciates how much will "any" arm be worth if you can buy a lovely g50 for peanuts, and (segwaying nicely into Janices' point) put a monkey behind to operate it? Janice is unfortunately so so right and it is beginning to happen already the tide is coming in and I fear there is no stopping it.
I had a last minute call last week for a highly rated magic program in a prime tv slot because they couldn't find another glidecam v8 or anyone hanging around the office to operate it. The guy who was operating the v8 had never done a course and while he understood a lot and did a good job in the circumstances (only hvx200) he wasn't a proper operator by any means. It seems these days anyone can and is doing steadicam and programe makers love the savings in their budgets without caring too much about the finished product. All I can do to keep on top of the wannabees is to be a better operator and keep my good reputation in tact, then hope that producers will see the advantage of paying a premium and hiring quality people with quality gear to get them a better product.
Well lets hope that sleds and vests stay expensive at least. Did I just say that.

On a lighter note this video does show off the beautiful isoelasic action of the G series, I just love the way it just floats where you put it I would buy one now but they are a bit expensive at the moment like houses.
:-)
Dave.
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#10 Jerry Holway

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Posted 22 April 2008 - 06:00 PM

All-

I watched some "clumsy" production line guys work with the zero-G, and believe me, it was astonishing.

Their finesse, their precision, their working-out-the-wrinkles and applying this radical technology to their needs was amazing to watch, and it was truly humbling. Without a six day workshop... they figured it out all on their own. And they had useful and radical suggestions on how to improve things.

Amazing technology for amazing craftsmen.

Jerry
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#11 David Hughes

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Posted 22 April 2008 - 07:16 PM

Ok Jerry, well, point taken. May I retract the word "clumsy" from my last rant.
I as well appreciate a true craftsman at work and never meant to imply that trade-craftsmen were clumsy people in general, only that a workshop environment is likely to be a harsher place to use this technology than for example a film set where everyone is truly careful all the time of everything that we use to make a film (if you have a good crew), where everyone on set knows these things are hideously expensive to repair or replace. Mostly I suspect because said equipment has been purchased at great expense by the end user (us) and not supplied by the boss or company with the noble intentions of saving the worker injury. I try my utmost to look after the kit I am given to use but i think we all take care of our own investments just that bit more preciously. It's just human nature.
The kit we use should be and generally is tough stuff but everything has it's breaking point and things will and do fail even with the best of design intentions. I will be great to see what improvements we will be able to make in support arm technology after subjecting it to workshop stresses and finding out where the weak spots are.
So Jerry. Are you in the know can you tell us if it is basically a G series or is it made from cheeper stuff and not suitable for our us? or would that be saying too much for now?
Dave.

Edited by David Hughes, 22 April 2008 - 07:22 PM.

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