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#1 Mark Calver

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Posted 10 February 2008 - 01:52 AM

Hey Guys,


So I own some cheap Premier wireless brand video transmitter. It works fine for what i do it has a strong signal as long as im within line of site. My question is, is there a way to add some kind of rf generator on the receiver end so i can send it to a little hand held T.V. screen and just pick it up through the RF waves? If there is a cheap solution to this problem I would appreciate it. I would like to hear if anyone out there has found a solution for cheap.

thanks,

Mark
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#2 Charles Papert

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Posted 10 February 2008 - 02:33 AM

Sounds like you are looking to add a transmitter onto your transmitter...can be a bit dicey as you will double your chances of dropouts etc. Your best bet if you really want to do what you are describing is to use a second transmitter on your rig. Supercircuits has an inexpensive one that can be tuned in below Ch. 14 on the pocket-size TV's don't have channel buttons (they slide up and down the frequencies). Check it out here:

http://www.supercirc...amp;ProdID=3438
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#3 Mark Calver

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Posted 10 February 2008 - 12:30 PM

Sounds like you are looking to add a transmitter onto your transmitter...can be a bit dicey as you will double your chances of dropouts etc. Your best bet if you really want to do what you are describing is to use a second transmitter on your rig. Supercircuits has an inexpensive one that can be tuned in below Ch. 14 on the pocket-size TV's don't have channel buttons (they slide up and down the frequencies). Check it out here:

http://www.supercirc...amp;ProdID=3438



Hey Charles,

Thanks for the reply, The description of that transmitter sounds great and exactly what i need but when I look at the picture of it, it doesnt make any sense to me. Have you used it before? And do I have to build it or wil it come ready to plug and play?

thanks,

Mark
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#4 Charles Papert

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Posted 10 February 2008 - 02:18 PM

If I remember correctly (I bought one of these years ago for a wireless witness camera setup), the cables have a 9 volt battery connector and a female RCA plug for video. You should be able to feed it 12v though if you want to replace the battery with a sled connector.

Remember again that this will not work with the larger handheld TV's that have direct tuning, unless they also have the electronic sliding tuning as well.
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#5 Brandon Thompson

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Posted 10 February 2008 - 10:22 PM

wow i fell like an idiot. I bought a $500 transmitter by Shotwatcher when i first started. That Supercircuits is the same device inside the plastic housing. Looks like i paid about $400 for a 9v battery and a plastic box. oh well
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#6 Dave Gish

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Posted 19 February 2008 - 12:50 PM

Supercircuits has an inexpensive one (video trsansmitter) that can be tuned in below Ch. 14 on the pocket-size TV's don't have channel buttons (they slide up and down the frequencies). Check it out here:

<a href="http://www.supercircuits.com/index.asp?Pag...amp;ProdID=3438" target="_blank">http://www.supercircuits.com/index.asp?Pag...amp;ProdID=3438</a>

I just ordered one of these for $60 shipped.

The owners manual says: "a digital cable ready TV will receive the 434 MHz signal around channel 58 or 60. Be sure the TV is set to
receive cable channels. Also make sure the cable is detached and an antenna is put in it?s place."

It also says:" Please note that cable ready tuners do not have a very ?hot? receiver and performance may be compromised. Loops or rabbit ears work well at close range, but if you need distance, a directional antenna matched to 434 MHz can greatly improve performance."

Store link: http://www.supercirc...amp;ProdID=3438
Manual Link: http://www.supercirc.../avx434mini.pdf

I'm a newbie, and I'm just looking to get something that will show people how the shot is being framed and how smooth the camera movement is. I'll probably get something else when I get more serious.

Does anyone else have experience with this? Has anyone used it with a cable-ready digital flat panel TV?

For $60, it seems worth the gamble.

Edited by Dave Gish, 19 February 2008 - 12:52 PM.

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#7 Mark Calver

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 01:28 AM

Yea I had just ordered that same transmitter and it works great. You lucked out though cause when ordered it not even two weeks ago it was at $100.00. The down side is it doesnt come in a housingso you have to make one yourself.


good luck,
Mark
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#8 Dave Gish

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Posted 23 February 2008 - 10:22 AM

I just got the SuperCircuits AVX434MINI Video Transmitter yesterday and got a chance to test it. I'm using it with a regular TV tuned into cable channel 59, with a $25 amplified UHF antenna, shown here:
http://www.amazon.co...-...1824&sr=8-1

The results are good, but not great. There are faint lines rolling vertically through the picture, and occasional bursts of noise on the video even close to the receiving antenna. With a walls in between, the noise gets worse.

SD widescreen does seem good enough for someone else to see how the shot is framed and judge the performance at close to medium distances. So it would be nice if I could get this to work better.

434 MHz is below the UHF TV band (starts at 470), so maybe the antenna is the problem? The user manual for the SuperCircuits AVX434MINI says: "Loops or rabbit ears work well at close range, but if you need distance, a directional antenna matched to 434 MHz can greatly improve performance."

Any ideas for improvement?

Is there a good small antenna that's tuned to 434 Mhz? Should I try another type of UHF antenna?

Would a downconverter improve things? http://www.hamtv.com/down.html#tvc4g

What about a receiver? http://www.rf-video.com/pdf/m806.pdf

Any info appreciated.
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#9 Mark Calver

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Posted 23 February 2008 - 03:19 PM

I dont know if this could be your issue or not but I had the same problems on the first T.V. I tested it with which wasn't the greatest. Then I tuned in a couple of hand held T.V.'s and the difference was amazing It worked great I walked at least 60 feet away passing through a brick wall and the reception was still pretty good with little noise. I also forgot to mention it was an analogue signal.

Mark
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