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Need thicker stage plate for Master series TODAY.


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#1 David Allen Grove

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Posted 20 December 2007 - 10:55 AM

Does anyone have a top stage plate that's thicker (taller) than the standard size XCS plate? Say an inch or two thicker?

Having strange clearance problems with Arricam and huge ring lite.

MAG or ring lite depending on which way the top stage is turned doesn't allow me to balance the rig correctly becuase of the stage is too long.

It's my first time with the Arricam but I've used the giant ring lite before with no problems...until now.

The temporary solution we came up with is using a shoulder mount bracket between the camera and my XCS plate. But this thing places the camera SOO high and that piece is apparently so heavy that it's really too top heavy. It's topping out my arm too! Yikes.

If anyone has a really thick top plate or some other solution so the mag can clear my stage, please call at 323-385-3456(anytime today) or email before 1pm at davidgrove(AT)gmail.com

Thanks a bunch.
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#2 Afton Grant

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Posted 20 December 2007 - 11:05 AM

Hey Dave,

Do you have more than one dovetail? Another XCS, or perhaps your original Master dovetail? I've never tried it, but is it possible to stack them somehow? Perhaps XCS on top of the Master (or another XCS), since the XCS has ridges that would allow it to sit flat. You'd probably need to be creative with your bolts and screws, but it may work.

Good luck,
Afton
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#3 Jess Haas SOC

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Posted 20 December 2007 - 02:38 PM

Seeing as how it is after 1 I really hope you found a solution. I know its too late for today but if you could find a low mode cage that comes apart or a weight plate you could stick it between the camera and your dovetail to get a little bit of extra clearance. If you know anyone who is handy with metal a thick aluminum plate with a few drilled and tapped holes should do the trick. If you were in Texas I could help you out with that.... The grip department might have a small cheese plate that could work in a pinch if you use longer machine screws to attach the camera. If it is a balance problem then would adding a little bit of extra weight to the rear of the camera help?

~Jess
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#4 David Allen Grove

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Posted 20 December 2007 - 03:11 PM

Thanks for everyone's input!
Actually it's only 12pm here in LA

These are all great ideas.

Someone is letting me use a delron plate (or two) that has holes and bolts. I'm going to give that a try as it
looks like it could work.

Someone else suggested unscrewing the portion of stage that houses the remote stage wires
and tie wrapping them to the camera.

The plate stacking might work too. I have 1 XCS plate and two master plates. Might be cutting it close. Maybe if I had 2 XCS plates?

I could swear I heard Greg bubb (XCS) made a really thick plate but maybe it was something else or maybe
the only thick plate he has is the one I have?

I'll try and remember to take a picture of whatever we come up with.

Thanks so much everyone! I really appreciate the help.

"There are no problems, only solutions!"
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#5 Jaron Berman

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Posted 20 December 2007 - 03:23 PM

If you get really in a bind, maybe try stacking some fender washers to the spacing you need
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#6 Louis Puli SOC

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Posted 20 December 2007 - 08:38 PM

"There are no problems, only solutions!"
[/quote]



Hi Dave
am I missing something here Why don't you use 2 Arri production slider plates and bolt them together (solid).
That would lift the camera at least 2"
Good luck
Louis Puli from down under B)
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#7 Lawrence Karman

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Posted 20 December 2007 - 11:19 PM

I seem to recall flying that damned LED ring light and having to use the camera sliding base plate and dovetail plate because the only was to mount the light was off the 15mm camera rods. That set-up gave plenty of clearance, Clarence for the camera to slide back to balance the light. Made the whole thing a bit heavier but it was what it was.
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#8 David Allen Grove

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Posted 21 December 2007 - 04:35 PM

We did wind up using the sliding base plate after all and it worked well.

I know I've done that before with other cameras for other reasons..
It was brought up but was dismissed for some reason. I wasn't around during that conversion as I was trying to get the rest of my rig built otherwise I would have investigated that option further!

It definitely worked better than the hand held grip bracket and cut the weight considerably.

The lessoned learned is Steadicam camera prep is extremely important and production should pay because it will cost more in the long run.

I had a rather lengthy, but nice, conversation about money and time with the producer
whom I've worked with before. He's now convinced that it's a wise investment.

I actually got a call from the UPM, Wednesday night, who apologized for not giving me a prep day! wow.

Besides the prep day issue, the rain, wind, the cold, the cancelled shot maker shot, the parking nightmare, lack of camera truck, the yelling, between producer / director / AD for disorganization, the job ended at night on a real high note with me on Steadicam doing a running 360 shot around talent in the crosswalk in front of the Kodak Theater and buildling lights flying by in the background. Keep in mind not only was there a lot of wind, I had the big ring lite, the extra weight of the plate and I had a battery belt strapped to my back mounted vest. It was a big hit. The clients went crazy over it. Everyone thought it was a pretty cool shot. Lots of "way-to-go's". It's those moments that make steadicam fun and worthwhile even when things aren't going so well (or organized!) and tension is high.

Thanks so much again for everyone's suggestions here online and off (Andrea) and offers to help with plates(Nick) and blocks(Charles)! This is another thing that makes Steadicam worth it.. the support!

Edited by David Allen Grove SOC, 21 December 2007 - 04:39 PM.

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#9 Mikko Wilson

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 04:16 PM

Gald it worked out David. :)

I know this is after the fact, but for future reference and purely out of curiosity; is there any reason one couldn't just open a post clamp and pan the entire upper post 180* and operate with the stage (& long nose-box) 'facing' backwards?


- Mikko
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#10 David Allen Grove

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 09:42 PM

Hi Mikko,

Thanks.

Master series owners as well as any other sled that has that long of a top stage HAVE to turn the top stage 180 in order to
get the lite ring close enough to the lens. So, yes, I did turn the top stage 180.

What happened after I turned the top stage was the magazine would not clear the "lip" (long part of the stage) which was now pointed backwards, so the camera was not on it's CG on the stage. It was far to back heavy.

The only way for the magazine to clear the lip was to raise the camera. Using the slider did the trick.

Edited by David Allen Grove SOC, 30 December 2007 - 09:51 PM.

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#11 Mikko Wilson

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Posted 31 December 2007 - 01:26 PM

"Ahaa", gotcha.

I thougth the light was hitting the nose-box .. but it was the mag. Makes sence now, thanks! :)


And yes, on re-reading your original post, there it is on the 3rd line. D'oh! :rolleyes:


- Mikko
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#12 RonBaldwin

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Posted 31 December 2007 - 02:18 PM

Not dissing any rig, but that's always been something that bugged me about the master's topstage (is the ultra2 the same?). It seems it might get in the way for some motor mounting/other accessories as well -- flipping to low mode do you have to move stuff around?

Could you cut it off? What's in there beside a few connectors/wires? Yes, a serious question.

rb
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#13 Jason Torbitt

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Posted 01 January 2008 - 07:53 AM

Hi Ron / guys

The contents of the nose of the Master depends on the version of the Master you have. For versions with the motorized stage, as well as connectors and cables, it houses the receiver (correct me if I'm wrong) for the motorized gimbal control, so it's pretty jam packed. For the Broadcast version, it's simply an empty box with, as you say, wires inside it. It is held in place with screws and very easy to remove should you decide to, but obviously you'd have to sort the panel BNC / Hirose / Lemo connectors and find another way of dealing with those.
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#14 nick franco

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Posted 01 January 2008 - 11:15 AM

Glad you got it worked out David. Any pictures of this specialness?
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#15 David Allen Grove

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Posted 01 January 2008 - 01:47 PM

Ron,

Yes, the top stage bugs me too and I'm suprised they kept it for the later models.
Maybe it's the only way to house the motorized stage board and wires?

I do have the Film system so it is FULL of wires and a board..
The only trouble I've run into with the nose is the giant ring light.
I've never had trouble in low mode or mounting motors or other stuff.

Having said that, if I had a master that didn't have the motorized stage, I would have lost that nose a while ago. ;)

Nick,

Didn't have time to take photos from this job but I know I have a photo from the first time I flew with a ring light.
I'll have to dig that up and post it. I'm sure it's the same setup with the slider.
There might be a picture of it on the forum somewhere from a few years ago?
Thanks again for offering up your plates. That would be interesting to see if stacking plates would work.

Edited by David Allen Grove SOC, 01 January 2008 - 01:53 PM.

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