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What to wear


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#1 JoshM

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Posted 19 December 2007 - 03:23 PM

Hi,

It odd coming to a stedicam forum asking what clothes to wear (while operating stedicam) but its been bugging me for ages, so I will ask ... oh I just did. So what clothes do you wear while using a stedicam. It the winter now so I find if I have a coat it gets in the way same with Jeans they slow me down and the camera will shake more weirdly than if I freeze and have no coat.Does anyone have the same problem, do you wear anything specail? Any comments will be good

Thanks

Edited by JoshM, 19 December 2007 - 03:24 PM.

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#2 Adrien RADICI

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Posted 19 December 2007 - 03:43 PM

Does anyone have the same problem, do you wear anything specail?


Always wear my leopard thong :P And when it's too hot... i'm naked B)
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#3 Iain Baird

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Posted 19 December 2007 - 03:46 PM

I use a Down Coat in the Winter as it will compress in the spots where the vest needs to sit and stay puffy everywhere else. It's all a matter of taste and preference.
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#4 JoshM

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Posted 19 December 2007 - 04:06 PM

Im think Im just trying to see what is best the stedicam is heavy so I need to minimise any other weight or anything getting in the way. I thought there was something specail as I seen some topics on this forum about shoes so I thought it will be the same with what you wear :)

Adrien RADICI, funny.

Thanks
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#5 Adrien RADICI

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Posted 19 December 2007 - 04:10 PM

I like the Eider gore tex products. You can move very easily with their coats but i find it a little bit expensive.

Eider products
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#6 Iain Baird

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Posted 19 December 2007 - 04:42 PM

Not many coats lighter than a down filled North Face.
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#7 Reid Russell

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Posted 19 December 2007 - 10:05 PM

100% Wool is best! Rain, snow, wind, cold. Sweat all you want and still stay warm and dry. Get it cheap at any Army Navy store.
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#8 tarik hameedi

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Posted 19 December 2007 - 10:11 PM

northface jackets are pretty thin and warm... they work well for me in the cold.
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#9 Alfeo Dixon SOC

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Posted 19 December 2007 - 11:56 PM

Layers... underarmor + thin hard shell northface + steadivest + operating = comfortable in the 40~50's

any colder try adding the down coat over the vest.
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#10 Stephen Press

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Posted 20 December 2007 - 02:16 AM

I?m a big fan of layers of Icebreaker Marino wool products


Also the coat on top of the vest so I can get it off if I am too hot.

Edited by Stephen Press, 20 December 2007 - 02:20 AM.

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#11 mark morgan

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Posted 20 December 2007 - 02:38 AM

aloha guys
sorry to get alittle off track
this stuff doesn't keep you warm but it's
loaded with "titanium" great for blood circulation and pain
and it's thin enough to wear under all the other stuffs
the company is called "PHITEN"
they make nice long and short sleeve shirts
that look great, as on stage blacks
they also make other products
such as necklases,wrist bracelets,knee support,underwear
etc.etc.,all for aches and pains
and it works for me
damn i sound like a sells rep
i'm not, just sharing a fine discovery
thanks to my girlfriend

for more info check out
www.phitenusa.com
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#12 Amando Crespo

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Posted 21 December 2007 - 05:59 PM

Hi Josh. For me, one of the most important thing are the shoes. You have think that your legs, knees, ankles have to bear your weight plus vest, arm and sled and camera.
One pic. with no comfortable suit

Attached Files


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#13 Jess Haas SOC

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Posted 22 December 2007 - 01:42 AM

Personally I prefer to operate barefoot. Of course your feet have to be in the right kind of shape for it, but it allows your bodies natural shock absorption to function better and gives you a lot more feedback which can help you to keep from tripping,etc....

Of course going around most film sets barefoot isn't exactly kosher, and on some surfaces and situations it could be just plain dangerous.

So far I have only done it on set a few times with crews that I was very familiar with.

~Jess
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#14 Jason Torbitt

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Posted 22 December 2007 - 08:12 AM

I like working in layers in the winter - as you warm up, off comes a layer at a time. Shirt, then the Vest, then probably a fleece and then either coat (North Face parka) on top of everything, or lightweight waterproof coat, with trusty hole for the socket block!

Barefoot? I've done that a couple of times - but only when I've been told off by sound recordists for my great clumping size 12 feet!
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#15 Afton Grant

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Posted 22 December 2007 - 09:10 AM

Barefoot? I've done that a couple of times - but only when I've been told off by sound recordists for my great clumping size 12 feet!


How dare they! I've had sound guys comment to me before, but it's been mostly on lower budget jobs. An experienced mixer will realize the sound of you walking comes with the territory. And if one ever "told me off" about making noise, I'd dock the rig, and politely ask him or her to pick up the 70+ lbs of gear and walk around without making noise. It's impossible, and frankly not safe for you.

If it's really a problem, work with them to a point. Can you lay down a sound blanket? Sweep up debris that might be crunching underfoot? Avoid a squeaky floorboard? But never remove your shoes. They're such an important part of your gear. It's where the rubber meets the road.
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