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"Atonement" Jaw-dropping 5 min complex scene


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#1 Louis Puli SOC

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Posted 24 November 2007 - 11:02 PM

Hi everyone
Has any one seen this film yet I have just read the review which said

"Most memorable scene is a 5 1/2 min shot of wounded and demoralized British soldiers stranded on Dunkirk's beach in 1940. Filmed in one continuous shot with a steadicam cost $2.3 million to set up ,1000 extras.The camera takes in a phalanx of horses being shot,burning army vehicles,a smoldering fairground .a beached boat with slashed masts and out of the water, some of the 700 or so ships that would eventually save the Allied troops."

The A camera / steadicam op was Peter Robertson .If any one knows Peter it would be great to ask him about it.
It has not been released in Australia yet. Looking forward to seeing
Fly safe
Louis Puli B)
from down under
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#2 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 20 December 2007 - 11:24 PM

I just saw this a couple of nights ago in Hollywood. I'm usually not a fan of "flashbacks," but the way they were used really worked in a very interesting way. Overall, I was very pleased with the film.

Of course the 5 min 20 sec long Steadicam shot by Peter Robertson was astounding. What I really want to know is did he really do it with a 1000' mag?
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#3 Todd Ferguson

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Posted 21 December 2007 - 01:42 PM

Atonement was a great film you will enjoy it. The choreography with the main characters coming and going was a nice touch and the shot gets wide to see the path he took. I've seen the diagram in the recent ASC magazine. The whole film looked fantastic.

Todd Ferguson.
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#4 Reid Russell

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Posted 21 December 2007 - 02:50 PM

I just saw this a couple of nights ago in Hollywood. I'm usually not a fan of "flashbacks," but the way they were used really worked in a very interesting way. Overall, I was very pleased with the film.

Of course the 5 min 20 sec long Steadicam shot by Peter Robertson was astounding. What I really want to know is did he really do it with a 1000' mag?



I went to a screening in Hollywood with a Q&A with Seamus McGarvey afterward and I heard they stuck a 500' shortend into a Panavision 400' mag. From what I remember it was only 3 or 4 takes. The light wasn't right on the first take and it was too dark by the time they got into the fourth take. I believe your watching the 3rd take during magic hour.
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#5 PeterAbraham

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Posted 24 December 2007 - 07:19 PM

Apparently the 500 foot load trick was also used for the opening shot in "The Bonfire Of The Vanities", operated by Larry McConkey. Custom wound loads from Kodak, if I recall the tale correctly.


Looking forward to this film !

Peter Abraham
New York
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#6 Tim Fabrizio

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 04:55 PM

I know this post is old and I'm sure you have your answer but I found this article describing the shot. Great stuff and great work hiding the step on/offs of two different rigs.
http://www.icgmagazi...itching-a-ride/
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