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How matching 2 video cameras with an OCP in a control camera room


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#1 Nacho Minguez

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 01:07 AM

Hello guys,

Do you know the easy way, in simple words, of matching 2 cameras in studio production using a OCP control panel, a Waveform monitor and a vectorscope? The main parameters, and how to do?

Thanks
Nacho Minguez

Steadicam Owner/Operator

SPAIN
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#2 Rob Vuona SOC

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 01:41 PM

Hey Starling,
You want to field this one . . .?

Nacho give Robert Starling a try , he's on this forum, he does DIT work on the side he can probably give you the basics to get those cameras painted correctly.

Good Luck
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#3 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 06:54 PM

Try cinematography.com There are a lot of people there that would be happy to help you.
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#4 Stephen Press

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 08:35 PM

Tell the vision controller to get off their ass and do it :D

It?s actually simple to explain but harder to do.
I?m going to assume you know how to colour balance one camera on a gray scale with a Waveform monitor and a vectorscope because if you don?t then you shouldn?t be doing it.

Step 1: Put the cameras side by side, framed on the gray scale.
Step 2: Grade one till you like it.
Step 3: Grade the other till it looks the same.

Good luck

Edited by Stephen Press, 14 November 2007 - 08:38 PM.

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#5 Dan Coplan

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 11:07 PM

I would add that if the rental house hasn't already set a baseline for you, set a baseline for your master camera and then match the other camera(s) menu and switch settings so they're identical. From that point, do as Stephen Press said. Leave your master camera alone (given that you're happy with it), and tweak the other(s) to it. You should also get a proper color chart - a necessity in matching the color. A resolution chart will help you adjust the detail settings.

Note: Simply loading settings from one camera to another does not guarantee matching. All it guarantees is that they have the same menu settings. But no matter how fancy the camera, odds are they will not match perfectly regardless of matching settings.

Dan
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#6 Norbert von der Heidt

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Posted 19 November 2007 - 08:57 AM

Note: Simply loading settings from one camera to another does not guarantee matching. All it guarantees is that they have the same menu settings. But no matter how fancy the camera, odds are they will not match perfectly regardless of matching settings.

Dan



Just to add to what Stephen and Dan have said.

I did camera CCU operation or vision control as they say here in the Antipodes, for almost 15 years back in Canada starting on second generation colour cameras. The controls for one camera alone occupied one half of a full equipment rack. I had the kind of control where I actually had to set the aspect ratio of the camera tube image on all 3 colour channels every time the cameras were fired up. The operator accessible controls that are available in menus on todays camera are pretty basic in their functions, limited in their adjustment range and too course in their degree of adjustment. At least to match 2 or more cameras exactly, in my opinion.

Proper alignment of muliple cameras requires as a minimum: (1) a proper 45 degree lighting setup in a darkened room, (2) a 10 step gray scale chip chart, (3) a light meter to check for and help adjust for even illumination on the chart, (3) a professional CRT colour monitor of sufficient size to see things easily (LCDs still don't cut it), (4) a waveform monitor, (5) a vector scope, (6) a set of extender boards for the cameras you're working on as many of the adjustments necessary to do are not on the menus and (7) an engineers service manual to tell you what the tech specs etc. are that your'e working toward.

It's best that you hire somone with the expertise and gear to do the job if want it perfect. When you don't know what your doing and to start doing it yourself is asking for trouble because it's so easy to get lost in the process and then I can guarntee, you won't be able to find your way back. I've been there a few times, so I know!

Best of luck!

Cheers
Norbert
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