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complete shut down in the Heat


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#1 Ramon Engle

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Posted 03 September 2007 - 10:07 PM

I wanted to share this.
Location: Blueberry farm in South Carolina
Date: August 9th
Temperature: 105

We began shooting around 9am. By noon the temp was over 100 degrees.
By 2pm it was 105. My Preston and AR shut down.......just quit.
The camera body was so hot that you couldn't keep your hands on it for more than 3 or 4 seconds.
I was concerned that my gear was ruined. We wrapped early because of the heat.
Once I was home I fired up the Preston HU3 and my AR and all was well.
Has anyone experienced anything similar to this?

Ramon
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#2 Robert Starling SOC

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Posted 03 September 2007 - 11:38 PM

Has anyone experienced anything similar to this?
Ramon


Hi Ramon, working here in Las Vegas and the Southwest in general its common to have ambient temps in the shade well over 105 and recently as high as 117 degs with the surface metals and plastics of the camera bodies so hot they're too hot to touch.

Electronically I've seen a few different Sony SD and HD cameras exhibit visual symptoms such as a pixelized image with color bands and mosaic patterns in high temps but those are only anecdotal observations; I have nothing scientific to prove heat was the cause. I just know if I don't keep them shaded I can get the same effect. The operating temperatures are buried in the technical details of every camera and they all have temperature limits.

On an HD aerial shoot back in June it was around 110 degs ambient and the hard drive recorder we were recording to kept giving us an overheating warning.

It's an obvious fix but I am very vigilant about covering the camera and my cart and keeping an umbrella overhead to shade it and me as much as possible.
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#3 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

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Posted 04 September 2007 - 12:08 AM

We began shooting around 9am. By noon the temp was over 100 degrees.
By 2pm it was 105. My Preston and AR shut down.......just quit.



In 25+ years of dealing with steadicam I have seen one heat related equipment shutdown (Other than a battery charger, that's to be expected) and that was a Preston in 128F heat in 29 palms on a HD Feature.

THe HD Cameras were freaking un-stoppable, and man did that suck.
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#4 Charles Papert

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Posted 04 September 2007 - 12:12 AM

Last summer on "Balls of Fury" we managed to get the Genesis to overheat in 95 degrees at best. From then on we covered it with Mylar when it was going to exposed to the sun for long periods (it was on the Technocrane at the time).
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#5 Erwin Landau

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Posted 05 September 2007 - 04:46 PM

On a western last month, we where shooting at Disney Ranch... the 2nd AC had already a heat stroke... but the Aaton 35 was next with blown fuses and heat issues... Had no Umbrella because my AC's had destroyed mine on the previous feature up at 9000 feet... all of my components where uncomfortable to touch, but held up fine. I had to turn of my rig to prevent over heating between takes... but never skipped a beat.

Last week we where on the tarmac of the Van Nuys Airport, chasing cars and crashing them and it was hitting 135 F... again the people shot down before my equipment did...

Stay in the shade and drink a lot of liquids,


Erwin
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#6 Janice Arthur

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Posted 10 September 2007 - 09:27 AM

Guys;

I've been using those chemical Ice bags in heat lately and they work well.

If you don't know what I referring to they are the plastic bags with two chemicals in them; you break the inner bag and they are instantly cold.

You can put them on yourself or the gear, when you wrap them in a towel.

They fit inside the front of my vest and also on the neck when you take a break.

I've recently found them at a dollar store so they're cheap too.

Janice
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#7 Ramon Engle

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 09:38 AM

Hi Janice. What simple solution for the operator. We've been using the old "Sea Breeze Ice Bath Bandana" solution. I like the ice pack better.
I've tried canned air on the gear. Not so efficient.
I'm in Chicago now where the weather is fantastic so no reel need for the ice packs.
Damn, its' hard to get a bad meal here!


Ramon
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#8 TJ Williams

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Posted 03 October 2007 - 06:45 PM

Here in WA when it gets hot.... like in over 70 we just let the water pour over ourselves, which sorta naturally occurs here .
Janice you are such a maven of style... No wet T in Chicago. Have used those little bag thing they are great!
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