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Gyro stabilizers


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#1 Seth Orozco

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Posted 15 August 2007 - 05:27 PM

Hi,
I'm a camera assistant here in LA and recently got ahold of 2 gyros. I'm trying to make a gyro stabilized rig to attach to a camera. They are made by the Kearfott Company and have a round 10 pin connector on the back.
I need to find an electrician familiar with gyros to create a power cable of some sort, and I figured steadicam forum might be a good place to start!
Any help or leads would be appreciated.
Thanks,
Seth
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#2 Rob Vuona SOC

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Posted 15 August 2007 - 09:57 PM

Hi,
I'm a camera assistant here in LA and recently got ahold of 2 gyros. I'm trying to make a gyro stabilized rig to attach to a camera. They are made by the Kearfott Company and have a round 10 pin connector on the back.
I need to find an electrician familiar with gyros to create a power cable of some sort, and I figured steadicam forum might be a good place to start!
Any help or leads would be appreciated.
Thanks,
Seth

-----------------
Terry West can wire them for you
310-374-5711

Good Luck
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#3 Seth Orozco

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Posted 19 August 2007 - 06:07 AM

Terry West can wire them for you
310-374-5711

Good Luck

Thanks, I'll give him a call!
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#4 Alec Jarnagin SOC

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Posted 19 August 2007 - 08:03 AM

Seth,

"They are made by the Kearfott Company and have a round 10 pin connector on the back. "

Not familiar with these Gyros. Could you post some pictures and specs?

Good luck with your project - keep us updated.

Also, please change your "display name" to your real name as that is one of the rules within our community.

Thanks,

Alec
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#5 Seth Orozco

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Posted 25 August 2007 - 11:58 PM

Here are some pics of the gyros. The first one shows the label with what appears to be some wiring diagrams. Each black dot corresponds to the color coded pins on the 2nd picture (BK, BR, RD, OR, YW, GN, BU, VI, WH).
Could these diagrams be enough to figure out the wiring? I don't know enough about electronics to decipher them. I figure these gyros are made for doing much more than I need, but if I can just get them spinning full speed with a way to turn them on and off, they might just do the trick!
By the design of the connector end it looks like it was designed to hook into its counterpart by twisting to lock, then secured by 3 machine screws. I think I could get something machined to hook this up to with just the 3 screws (no twist-lock necessary) and improvise the wiring by soldering wires if I could just be sure of the wiring and have it tested out by someone with electrical experience.
Thanks for the help!

Seth Orozco
filmcore@sbcglobal.net

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#6 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

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Posted 26 August 2007 - 01:25 AM

Could these diagrams be enough to figure out the wiring? I don't know enough about electronics to decipher them. I figure these gyros are made for doing much more than I need, but if I can just get them spinning full speed with a way to turn them on and off, they might just do the trick!
By the design of the connector end it looks like it was designed to hook into its counterpart by twisting to lock, then secured by 3 machine screws. I think I could get something machined to hook this up to with just the 3 screws (no twist-lock necessary) and improvise the wiring by soldering wires if I could just be sure of the wiring and have it tested out by someone with electrical experience.



Well, a few things. First off it's a rate gyro, meaning that it's designed not to stabilize but measure rate of precession so it's not a real good gyro to use as a stabilizer. the other issue is that in order to use it you need a 26V 400HZ AC power supply. What that means is that your not going to be able to plug it into a 12 Volt or 24 Volt camera battery.

Any Avionics shop can get that gyro spinning and probally get you a power supply.
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#7 RANDY RADZAVICH

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Posted 22 April 2008 - 12:16 PM

Hi,
I'm a camera assistant here in LA and recently got ahold of 2 gyros. I'm trying to make a gyro stabilized rig to attach to a camera. They are made by the Kearfott Company and have a round 10 pin connector on the back.
I need to find an electrician familiar with gyros to create a power cable of some sort, and I figured steadicam forum might be a good place to start!
Any help or leads would be appreciated.
Thanks,
Seth


You should check out Kenyon Laboratories.... http://www.ken-lab.com/. They make the best 2 axis gyros and have 50+ years in the business. Many steadicam operators swear by them...
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