Jump to content



Photo

Got the finance, now some questions...


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Nathan Johnson

Nathan Johnson

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 25 June 2007 - 03:43 PM

Hey Everyone! I've been doing some research on this site for a little while now and so far everyone has been a great help. Now, I finally got financial backing and want to know the next steps.

I was looking at the Clipper 24, but from what I've read, everyone just says to go with the U2. I agree... So now here are my questions

1. I know the U2 new is just under 60K. any ballpark prices for used? leased?

2. What equipment will I need just to start out?(i.e. Cables, mounts, lowmode) and a priority list of things to buy later? (i.e. follow focus)

3.How much is insurance, what does it cover, whos the best?

4.How likely am I to get hired with the right equiptment?


Thanks for the help...

-Nate J.
  • 0

#2 Jerry Holway

Jerry Holway

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 737 posts
  • Philadelphia

Posted 25 June 2007 - 05:01 PM

Nathan-

Please take a comprehensive workshop before you make any decision; the answers to all your questions and more will be covered, including leasing.

The answers anyone should give you depends a lot on you, your market, skills, etc. ? more (much much more) than the gear.

Jerry
  • 0

#3 Dan Coplan

Dan Coplan

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 507 posts
  • Los Angeles

Posted 25 June 2007 - 07:19 PM

Jerry's right. You're going to take a workshop eventually so not a bad idea to take one now before you make the full commitment (and it is quite a commitment) and guarantee this is what you want to do.

That being said, some very broad answers to your questions...

1. The odds of finding a U2 used are slim to none. Finding PROs used are very hard to come by, but they do come around every now and then. If you can stand to hold out in hopes of a used rig, you'll save a bundle which you will then, of course, have to turn right around and put into all sorts of accessories.

2. Basics: The sled, stand and docking bracket, batteries and charger, monitor, power cables for every camera out there, follow focus, video transmission, arm, vest, cases to hold everything (did I miss anything?). Beyond basics: Backups of every power cable, run/stop cables for every camera, a multitude of brackets and widgets, backup monitor, 2nd channel follow focus (iris), etc.

3. I can't comment on which insurance is the best but I and a number of people I know use Walter P. Dolle. I'm paying around $1K/year.

4. The right equipment doesn't mean diddly to you getting hired. You WILL have to work for free and cheap just getting started and it's getting damn competitive out there. Not saying you shouldn't go for it, but the commitment is financial in the purchase of gear, financial in that you shouldn't expect to make much of anything for a couple years, and psychological in that you had better want to be in this business for the love and not the money if you want to succeed and had better do well with frustration and be persistent and have a great attitude about it the whole time.

With all sincerity, good luck.

Dan
  • 0

#4 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 2922 posts
  • LA, Ca

Posted 25 June 2007 - 07:58 PM

1. I know the U2 new is just under 60K. any ballpark prices for used? leased?

2. What equipment will I need just to start out?(i.e. Cables, mounts, lowmode) and a priority list of things to buy later? (i.e. follow focus)

3.How much is insurance, what does it cover, whos the best?

4.How likely am I to get hired with the right equiptment?



I know that Erwin Landau has a fantastic Package that is pretty complete for something significantly less than an arm and a leg. All you would need is a vest and follow focus and you would have everything you need to fly just about any camera. The chances of finding a used U2 are less than zero and even if there was one it would go for pretty close to retail.

Talk to Wlater P. Doyle about insurance. ballpark rates are $1 per $1000 of value covered.

Having the right gear won't exactly get you hired. It's more about skill and credits. You're not going to walk onto the set of a $100Mill show without the experience.
  • 0

#5 Janice Arthur

Janice Arthur

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 811 posts

Posted 26 June 2007 - 01:53 PM

Nathan;

My 2 cents;

1) take a workshop. Learn lots.

2) don't rush to buy anything, keep getting more info about your choices.

3) figure out what your market. If you're in Idaho, you'll never pay off a $60k rig. If you're in LA can you afford the payments on an expensive rig while you get started?

3) Buy a vest and arm and a sled, a practice cage and a cheap home camera. Don't buy anything else.

4) Start practicing and getting free jobs, along the way you'll figure out the "accessories" that you really need. (Go get dirty.)
Every guy/gal's needs are different and this will keep you from buying stuff that you'll never use. (Everyone of us has stuff we bought and never used.) I can also promise you that its easy spend all your money and you'll look up and still need something; so don't spend all your money. The list grows forever.


Janice
  • 0




Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies

GPI Pro Systems

Omnishot Systems

Teradek

SkyDreams

Engineered Cinema Solutions

Wireless Video Systems

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

PLC Electronics Solutions

BOXX

IDX

Varizoom Follow Focus

Ritter Battery

Boland Communications

PLC - Bartech

Betz Tools for Stabilizers