Jump to content



Photo

Sony 900 shoot


  • Please log in to reply
22 replies to this topic

#1 Lars Erik

Lars Erik

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 543 posts
  • Norway

Posted 08 June 2007 - 03:37 AM

Hey all,

doing my first 900 shoot in July.

I've read on the forum that this camera is a real power eater. I've got a Hytron 120 with NP-1 in dual series on my sled. Is this enough power for the camera? I've requested a test day with the DP and the AC, but want to make sure if there is anything I need to invest in to make the shoot work.

And on the 900 house. Does it have a 12v D-tap power out?


Thanks for any replies


LE
  • 0

#2 Dan Coplan

Dan Coplan

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 507 posts
  • Los Angeles

Posted 09 June 2007 - 01:20 AM

I did a feature on the 900 using Trimpacs. I was able to complete takes and cycle through my batts without holding up production, but I did burn through them pretty quickly - 45 mins. on average considering shooting and standing by. On jobs like this, I try to get production to rent the batteries so I don't fry mine.

Every 900 I've seen has the standard Anton Bauer plate on back with a 2-pin P-tap connector, but you should verify this specifically because I'm pretty sure other mounts can be put on there.

Dan
  • 0

#3 Lars Erik

Lars Erik

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 543 posts
  • Norway

Posted 09 June 2007 - 02:35 AM

Ok, Dan. Thanks.

Is the 900 a 12v or a 24v camera? The DP said it was 24, but on the Sony site it says 12v.


BTW; we'll also be using the Pro35 from P+S Teckhnik


LE
  • 0

#4 Chris Konash

Chris Konash

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 111 posts
  • New Jersey

Posted 09 June 2007 - 03:19 AM

Lars,

The F900 is a 12V camera. You might want to ask the DP if you are going to be using an F900 or an F900R. The older 900 is bigger, longer, heavier, and draws more power than the newer 900R. The 900 also only has HD Component output or HD-SDI if you have the optional 901 SDI camera back (adds 3lbs. and 4" to the back) where the 900R has an internal downconverter to give you SD-SDI or composite without adding any weight, length, or power draw(this is an optional board internally). If it is a standard 900 you'll need some kind of downconverter to get a composite signal to your monitor unless you have an HD monitor. On a feature I did with a standard F900 I ran 2 dionic 90 batteries and had no problem running the morning on 2 batts then changing batteries for the afternoon. I can remember only once or twice running through more than 4 dionic 90's in a day (without the Pro35).

The Pro 35 is not really a steadicam friendly piece. It's been done many times but it immediately adds about 8in to the overall length and about 6lbs with all the mounting stuff needed.

If your going to use the Pro 35 and don't have an HD monitor, try not to get the SDI camera back just to down convert to your monitor. This option adds weight and length which you don't need. Get an AJA downconverter and stick it to the side of the camera, much lighter and smaller.

Attached are some pictures of a standard F900 with the SDI back and an F900R with a Pro35 and Primo lenses.

Attached File  Favorite_Son_8.8.06__89_.jpg   90.32KB   226 downloads
This camera was 34lbs. Without a battery on the camera and the viewfinder removed. Granted that downconverter was huge and about 3lbs.

Attached File  DSC_3163.jpg   102.72KB   187 downloads


Good luck

Chris Konash
  • 0

#5 Rob Vuona SOC

Rob Vuona SOC

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 1143 posts
  • Los Angeles

Posted 09 June 2007 - 03:26 AM

Ok, Dan. Thanks.

Is the 900 a 12v or a 24v camera? The DP said it was 24, but on the Sony site it says 12v.


BTW; we'll also be using the Pro35 from P+S Teckhnik


LE

Hey Lars,
I just got home from shooting a Sony 900B gig, with a Miranda and a wireless transmitter. I use AB 140 and rotate through , they were lasting more than an hour each w/constant recording. They are 12 Volt and there's a 4 pin XLR power on the back.

Have fun
  • 0

#6 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 2922 posts
  • LA, Ca

Posted 09 June 2007 - 03:36 AM

Is the 900 a 12v or a 24v camera? The DP said it was 24, but on the Sony site it says 12v.



12 Volt
  • 0

#7 Lars Erik

Lars Erik

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 543 posts
  • Norway

Posted 09 June 2007 - 04:39 AM

Ok, everyone.

Thanks for all the great replies.

The camera is the older 900 I'm afraid.


LE
  • 0

#8 Jeff Muhlstock SOC

Jeff Muhlstock SOC

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 240 posts
  • New Jersey, USA

Posted 09 June 2007 - 07:33 AM

Ok, everyone.

Thanks for all the great replies.

The camera is the older 900 I'm afraid.


LE



Get an "ICON" downconverter. (its the little blue box thingy) much smaller and lighter then any other for this camera! Then tell the guy who owns the camera to get rid of the crapy out dated camera and buy a 900R! He will love to that. The "R" version is fantastic, built in downconverter, a fraction of the size and weight, and very power friendly. But all kidding aside, you will be much happier with the ICON, even if you have to rent one yourself for 50 bucks a day, trust me it makes the F900 a managable camera.
  • 0

#9 Alec Jarnagin SOC

Alec Jarnagin SOC

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 1800 posts
  • New York City, USA

Posted 09 June 2007 - 09:30 AM

A couple of notes:

The new 900R is fantastic as said, but the built in downconverter IS AN OPION - an expensive one that takes up a BNC connector on the camera body so a lot of people don't buy this board - check, check, check!

Also, if equipped with an older 900, go with one of the after-market backs that is both an HD-SDI converter and down-converter. They are smaller & lighter than the Sony version (which only converts RGB HD to HD-SDI and not to NTSC). Yes, the camera is a bit longer (than having no back), but the DP will want to monitor an HD signal and running three cables is just not an option so I want the ability to run SDI so I can run one small jumper mini-BNC to my vest and then barrel to normal BNC. Paint box can be run separately than unplugged for takes. Obviously, power from the rig to keep the camera shorter; although recently when using an F-900R I've been leaving the V-Lock battery on because this camera is so much smaller and lighter than previous models and I wanted a bit more length for handling (small lens and no PRO35 adapter).
  • 0

#10 MarkKaravite

MarkKaravite

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 332 posts
  • Detroit, Chicago, New York

Posted 11 June 2007 - 09:46 PM

A nice item to have on F900 shoots is an Anton Bauer adapter plate with a gold mount (as if it were a battery) with a 4 pin XLR on the back. Some of the downconverters that mount on the back of the camera (Miranda & Evertz) normally get power from the battery. If you don't have the plate, then you may be forced to mount a battery on the camera, which you don't want to do on the already too long F900/3. The Miranda is nice, because it will also output framelines over the NTSC output. I don't leave them on, but I use them to set up my framelines. Also, if you have a 4x3 monitor, the set the output of the downconverter to 16x9 letterbox. You have a proper image, and I put my bubble in the letterbox area.

Alec has a great point about running a lightweight BNC cable off the sled, to give your DP HD monitoring. I give them HD as much as possible, and for the few shots where you absolutely have to be cable free, you won't get the resistance. I make the DP aware of this ahead of time. First tell him he's going to be able to see HD the majority of the time, and he'll love it, then use the disclaimer for the needed cable free shots. Fred Davis makes some very nice "spaghetti" thin cables. I use the lighter 50ohm for monitoring only, and you need the slightly thicker 75ohm for a recorded signal (like Genesis). 6' to 8' is enough to get off the sled, and barrelled into another BNC on your back.

Keep in mind the length of the F900, especially with a PRO 35 (I hope with Primes, not a zoom). Physics takes over, and the length of the camera makes it harder to get started, and harder to stop. It's just a big lever. The first time I used an F900, I thought my gimball was bad, because I was going back and forth between 2 talent, and I was a bit late for each line during the first rehearsal. I quickly realized my normal timing was not going to work, and I had to memorize the dialogue so I could anticipate the move, and get it started early enough. I shot a non Steadicam job with a F900, Miranda downconverter, Dionic 160, PRO 35, Ang HR 25 - 250, 6x6 mattebox with eyebrow. I asked the AC to break out his tape and measure that pig. It was 4'6".

Regarding batteries, I always order Dionic 90's from the camera rental house, and cycle their batteries. My sled holds up to 3, so I can achieve good run times this way. If your rig normally takes Hytron 140's, see if you can get some Dionic 160's. You'll get longer run times, and save a couple pounds.

Low mode can be a problem as well. See if you can order a camera with an aftermaket handle, that will allow you to mount a dovetail plate directly to the handle. Running low mode with the camera upside down is an option, but video village will have to flip all their monitors, because the F900 does not have an image invert. The techs hate to put down their beverage to flip the monitors, so expect some resistance there.

Good luck,

Mark Karavite
A Camera / Steadicam Operator
mkaravite@comcast.net
  • 0

#11 MarkKaravite

MarkKaravite

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 332 posts
  • Detroit, Chicago, New York

Posted 11 August 2007 - 08:54 PM

Here, I found a picture of the pig itself. The look on 1st AC Joe Ward's face says it all.

BTW, that's the famous key grip Steve Cardellini (blue jacket) in the BG. Great key grip & great guy. I got a signed Cardellini clamp from him at the end of the shoot. I'm a swag groupie!

Mark
Attached File  F900_3_PRO35.jpg   151.65KB   184 downloads
  • 0

#12 Robert Starling SOC

Robert Starling SOC

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 1134 posts
  • Las Vegas, NV

Posted 11 August 2007 - 09:23 PM

The "R" version is fantastic, built in downconverter, a fraction of the size and weight, and very power friendly.


Jeff is right but just to clarify the downconverter board is an OPTION on the F900R... a very good option though and if I'm not mistaken it will only downconvert if you are shooting at 23.98. In my limited experience I've yet to find a rental-house F900R come with that board in it.

Edited by Robert Starling, 11 August 2007 - 09:24 PM.

  • 0

#13 Chris Konash

Chris Konash

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 111 posts
  • New Jersey

Posted 12 August 2007 - 09:44 AM

Robert,

Hope all is well. Yes the down converter board is an option, and it is capable of downconverting every signal the camera will record. 1080 @ 23.89, 24, 25, 29.97, 30, 59.94, and 60 FPS.

All the F900R's that Panavision own were ordered with these boards, also most are fully loaded with the slow shutter and 2-3 pull down boards as well. So drop on by if you ever in NY.

Chris Konash
  • 0

#14 Charles Papert

Charles Papert

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 2224 posts
  • Los Angeles

Posted 12 August 2007 - 12:06 PM

BTW, that's the famous key grip Steve Cardellini (blue jacket) in the BG. Great key grip & great guy. I got a signed Cardellini clamp from him at the end of the shoot. I'm a swag groupie!Attached File  F900_3_PRO35.jpg   151.65KB   184 downloads


And if inventing the Cardellini clamp wasn't enough, I have his quick release tiedown for my 2575 head that is pure genius. Just goes to show that you can be a successful inventor in this business but you still have to go out and make a day's wage on top of that.
  • 0

#15 RonBaldwin

RonBaldwin

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 2351 posts
  • Los Angeles

Posted 12 August 2007 - 01:48 PM

My only experience flying the Panavised f-900 abortion is the last 5 or 6 episodes of Jericho last season. What a pig. Here's a picture I dug up from a test-flight with an XCS sled Erwin had for sale (Mr. Fletcher now happily owns it). With this sled it was much more solid than my 1st generation PRO (the d-box3 has been bumped to the top of my "gotta have it" list). I popped the camera off the sled and onto a scale -- it was 35 lbs if I remember correctly. Not too much heavier than some other cameras we fly on a regular basis, but the mounting plate is a bone-job raising the camera a needless inch (thought I'd never find a needless inch...Panavision did) above where it should be.

bring on the Lisigav!

Attached File  IMG_4986.jpg   185.58KB   378 downloads
  • 0




Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

rebotnix Technologies

PLC Electronics Solutions

Engineered Cinema Solutions

Omnishot Systems

Betz Tools for Stabilizers

Ritter Battery

SkyDreams

Teradek

Boland Communications

IDX

Wireless Video Systems

GPI Pro Systems

Varizoom Follow Focus

PLC - Bartech

Paralinx LLC

BOXX