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XCS AR on the movie "21"


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#1 WillArnot

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Posted 28 March 2007 - 07:46 PM

Hi All,

Until I sell it I will continue to make money with it. Proceeds of this money earned w/ the AR are going to the Patent Holder Lynn Nicholson, who remains unpaid by the licensee Howard Smith of MK-V.
Again, I urge all current and future owners of the AR to demand that MK-V fulfill it's licensing agreement and pay the Patent Holder, Lynn Nicholson, the royalties agreed to for every unit sold WORLDWIDE.

Attached File  Run.jpg   199.24KB   930 downloads

For the rest of the series click here:
http://homepage.mac....otoAlbum18.html

The AR w/ :
- Arri 235
- 1 x DM2 Preston motor
- 15-40mm Angenieux zoom lens
- 2 x Dionic 90 (2 hr run time)

is a little heavier than a regular sled with a Panavision Lightweight or XL. Not the most ideal weight for doing full blown running stuff with, but managable. When a sync sound camera is mounted in the AR the weight goes up considerably.

When the AR is mounted on my XCS sled I keep my 2nd hybrid Pro Lite w/ XCS post & gimbal & D-Box III, built w/ the TB-6 and 2 x Hytron 140's. This accomodates the Genesis quite nicely.

The hardmounted shot on the electric car starts scraping the ground as our heroes come careening around the corner. We boom all the way up their bodies to find our man ripping off his disguise of wig and moustache etc. at a full running speed.

Note the bubble levels I keep mounted on the XCS AR. There is a distinct lack of levels on the AR when you see it at demos or trade shows. WHY? I don't like to rely simply on framing to say that I am level. If you understand what "keystoning" is all about, basically when you are not facing flat on to something there is an illusion of off level, you will know that to not level with a bubble can get you in trouble.

I guess if a bubble was not important we wouldn't have had one on the sled for the past, what 30 years??

To just level by eye is not "good enough" in my book.

Keeping the bubble also on the camera makes it very quick for me to zero everything out in between takes. It also gives my assistant a chance to take note of where in the move level is suffering due to inertia, as was the case with the whip pans while on the run in many of the shots pictured. This allows me to dial back the shot at specific times in order to minimize the inertial forces, and thus 'protect' the AR's capabilities at certain times. I hate to 'dial back' a shot due to technical limitations, but with a great assistant as I have with Erik L. Brown, it is possible to achieve great results. Being aware of what to look out for and when it is critical to this process is also paramount to success - hence bubble levels.

Also, as noted under the pictures, the XCS sled provides great configurability options. Being able to extend the batteries long (picture #11)and keep the mag forward for clearance issues is great not only for the inertial control but purely just from a quick ability to get balanced. Dynamic balance is pretty much out the window with the AR / Alien. If I want to get even stiffer w/ the Pan / Tilt inertia (depending on if the rig is horizontal or vertical) I can put longer rods on the bottom of the sled for the electronics or the 3rd battery mount. But these cost a huge amount of money from MK-V (another rip off IMHO) so I just got some of my own locally & cheaply.

Also note the monitor placement in picture #9. With the Transvideo 6" Superbright the whole monitor assembly weighs 5 lbs. Look at the pictures to see just how detrimental it is to not have as much mass as possible low on the sled. Look at where the mass is and look where the gimbal ends up. If the 5 lb monitor assembly were any higher up the post, the gimbal would get closer to the camera and you would quickly compromise your arm clearance around the magazine. Now think about what happens when you get anything but a 235 camera in there. i.e. Heavier. And the sled is 27" long already from top stage to bottom of XCS where the electronics mount. So in total the sled your are looking at is about 42" long - just shy of 4 ft. You do the math on a small set.

The solution becomes to add more mass to the bottom. I do this with a 3rd battery, sometimes even 2x dionics and a Hytron 140. Note that the 2lb placement of the Preston is also as far away from the camera as possible, helping to promote a shorter sled and better gimbal placement - therefore better clearance of the arm around the camera. Note also the use of the small J-Bracket on the arm. This also helps clear the mag from the arm during switches. The cables are never a problem for me, and I keep extra length available tucked away at the bottom of the sled if I choose to extend the sled or use the super post. Currently I have 11' long motor cables to go up to the lens motors. Preston has told me that you can have them up to 30 ft long without running into any problems. Good info.

Stay tuned, same time...same bat channel.

Will
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#2 JamesSainthill

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Posted 28 March 2007 - 09:41 PM

Hey Will -
Once again thanks for all the great info. I'm really glad that you care as much about the 'art form' as you do.

Just yesterday I was at a rental house in Toronto and the one of the owners quoted your info about the Dionic 90's and the Genocide that another local operator had emailed him.

Small world ...
James.
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#3 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

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Posted 29 March 2007 - 05:02 AM

Hi All,

Until I sell it I will continue to make money with it. Proceeds of this money earned w/ the AR are going to the Patent Holder Lynn Nicholson, who remains unpaid by the licensee Howard Smith of MK-V.

Attached File  Run.jpg   199.24KB   930 downloads

For the rest of the series click here:
http://homepage.mac....otoAlbum18.html



GREAT Stuff Will. Love the Zen Don Juan.
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#4 Brandon Thompson

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Posted 29 March 2007 - 10:10 AM

Hi All,

Until I sell it I will continue to make money with it. Proceeds of this money earned w/ the AR are going to the Patent Holder Lynn Nicholson, who remains unpaid by the licensee Howard Smith of MK-V.

Attached File  Run.jpg   199.24KB   930 downloads

For the rest of the series click here:
http://homepage.mac....otoAlbum18.html



GREAT Stuff Will. Love the Zen Don Juan.


This Question is for Will or really any seasoned op could answer,
In the picture that was nested in Will's first post I see Will's left hand on the post the right hand in mid air and his eyes are looking ahead not at the monitor. I guess my biggest question is how do you monitor the framing with a shot like this? and Also is there a reason the right hand isn't holding onto the gimbal? BTW I am a newbie and I love to analyze these pictures you guys post.

Thanks,
Brandon
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#5 mattmarek

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Posted 29 March 2007 - 02:33 PM

looks to be a running shot to me. when doing these types of shots, there will be times that you must look ahead of you to check your path. you just need to 'feel' your frame and know that you've got the lens aimed on target.

will's left hand is on the gimbal. maybe you meant why the right was not on the handle? well again, up to the user, but in running, it's easier to have your handle arm free for stability.

hope this helps.
:)
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#6 brooksrobinson

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Posted 30 March 2007 - 04:03 PM

Will,

How many times did you nail the extra in picture # 2? That poor fool and his tray cowering against the wall as you blow past him made me laugh out loud. Nice!

Brooks
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#7 WillArnot

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Posted 30 March 2007 - 08:37 PM

Zero. We did a couple of those passes on the 10mm where if you aren't close ya' got nothing. He and I had some specific conversations to plan that moment out precisely. His face was acting, his position was completely rehearsed. That was an exciting moment in the shot, felt like a rollercoaster ride. Video village was covering their eyes at times like this! Fun.

W.
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