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Helicoils on your sled


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#1 MarkKaravite

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 09:40 AM

Just something I ran across with my old 3A, and now on my new rig. Anywhere that you have a steel screw, that screws into aluminum tapped threads, has the problem of failing over time. The stronger steel threads on the handle will eventually pull out the weaker aluminum threads, usually at the most inopportune time.

On my old 3A, I had my machinist helicoil all the tapped aluminum (except the gimbal, which I was afraid to mess with). I recently had my monitor spigot threads misbehaving a bit, so I again had all the monitor spigots helicoiled, and the problem will never return.

I've been accused by my AC of cranking things too tight, so maybe this problem is self induced. The first place to fail is always the monitor bracket. Nothing worse than having something moving around on your rig, and you can't get it locked down.

For fellow members of overcrankers annonymous, most good auto parts stores have helicoil kits for standard and metric threads. Again, I am staying away from the gimbal, but my machinist replaced a few tapped aluminum threads on my monitor spigots with helicoils, and I feel better now. Who said overcranking was just for inside the camera?

Mark Karavite
A Camera / Steadicam Operator
mkaravite@comcast.net
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#2 Robert Starling SOC

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 10:59 AM

Just something I ran across with my old 3A, and now on my new rig. Anywhere that you have a steel screw, that screws into aluminum tapped threads, has the problem of failing over time.


My guess is you're dealing with Galvanic Action; the corrosive affect of other metals/alloys in contact with steel. Aluminum is considered a very "active" alloy when in contact with steel; if you're in a damp or salt water environment it compounds the effect.
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#3 chuck colburn

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 08:10 PM

Just something I ran across with my old 3A, and now on my new rig. Anywhere that you have a steel screw, that screws into aluminum tapped threads, has the problem of failing over time.


My guess is you're dealing with Galvanic Action; the corrosive affect of other metals/alloys in contact with steel. Aluminum is considered a very "active" alloy when in contact with steel; if you're in a damp or salt water environment it compounds the effect.


Hello Robert,

I would suggest putting some "Anti-Seeze" on steel threads that screw into aluminum. It's availble at auto part stores. Mechanics use it on spark plugs that mount into alloy engine heads.

Chuck
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#4 Chip Monk

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 09:08 PM

Oh, how I love them Helicoils.... Actually, Permacoils.

Life just wouldn't be the same without.

Just did the clamp on the lower stage of an EFP post.

And the "I" beam into the D-Box 2.

Sachtler Tripod Handle

The list goes on......
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#5 TJ Williams

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Posted 18 February 2007 - 01:18 AM

Steel threads into aluminum.... is right up there with cast parts instead of machined... large plastic parts...
and cables in the world of failure. Helicoils rule.... I've helicoiled everything on my new sled.
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