Jump to content



Photo

Newbie Line Practice


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 kip ross

kip ross

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 43 posts
  • Crabcake Nebula

Posted 15 November 2006 - 01:51 PM

I just recieved my Flyer and have been practicing the line and cross hairs excercises. My question is thus: When first starting out, would it be wiser to practice on a longer focal length than super wide? Wide angle being more forgiving than a longer lens, the analogy being: Walking with a backpak containing weights vs. just walking.

Any input is appreciated!

Kip "Line dancing in the kitchen" Ross
  • 0

#2 David George Ellis

David George Ellis

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 135 posts
  • Brooklyn Zoo

Posted 15 November 2006 - 03:25 PM

Since you don't always work with one lens on set, you need not to stay with one lens while you practice. It is wise to learn both and be as good with one side of the spectrum as the other. And all in between.

The wide-angle is forgiving. In the belief of keeping subjects in frame, but it gets everything else in frame. Stands, frames, areas that haven't been arted-up yet, the furny-pad covering the vent on the AC to keep soundy happy, etc. Also, wide lenses challenge you to keep horizons flat as opposed to tight lenses.

While working with tight lenses may seem like more of a challenge to keep things in frame, it corrects for the things mentioned in the paragraph above you normally deal with in the wide. It WILL teach you to be better at working with your slow, soft-game. Especially working at keeping only the eyes in shot, for instance.

I'd say do everything and record it for review. Switches, D.Juan, binary foci figure 8's, stairs AND Lo-mode. All on wide and narrow lenses. If you haven't done so, take a workshop.

We're asked to do a variety of things, so prepare yourself with a variety of exercises. Good luck.
  • 0

#3 Robert Starling SOC

Robert Starling SOC

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 1134 posts
  • Las Vegas, NV

Posted 15 November 2006 - 04:12 PM

Kip:

If you haven't done so already, you should try to take one of Peter Abraham's Steadicam workshops as well as the Steadicam Operators Association workshop. These were invaluable to me; I started with a Flyer and recently moved up to a Clipper 2.

Since the workshops I've set up quite the elaborate obstacle / practice course on my rear patio and backyard based on the exercises we practiced at the workshops. I put in at least 4-6 ten to fifteen minute practice sessions a day when I'm not shooting. Walking the line, even with a creative course set up can get pretty mind numbing but it's the basics and practice. What the second workshop did as well was to help me identify bad habits I'd developed as well as skills to develop. Even this week, I uploaded my Steadicam work for review and critique by Peter, including production stills of me operating for feedback on posture etc.. I don't think this is something he offers unless you were a prior student but there are plenty of people here with plenty to share and ample willingness to tell it like it is.

Robert Starling
Las Vegas
  • 0

#4 kip ross

kip ross

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 43 posts
  • Crabcake Nebula

Posted 15 November 2006 - 04:30 PM

Since you don't always work with one lens on set...

David and Robert,

Thanks for the input. I took Peter's 2 day workshop in October. This workshop resulted in my purchasing the Flyer. I'm going to mix up the focal lengths during practice. David: Your explanation re: the "wide and long "of things, as related to on-set variables is very helpful to me.

And Robert, I like the obstacle course idea in tandem with the "line dance". I'd be interested in what elements comprise your course.

Thanks to you both.

Kip "can't think of a clever middle moniker at the moment" Ross
  • 0

#5 Robert Starling SOC

Robert Starling SOC

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 1134 posts
  • Las Vegas, NV

Posted 15 November 2006 - 06:29 PM

And Robert, I like the obstacle course idea in tandem with the "line dance". I'd be interested in what elements comprise your course.

Kip "can't think of a clever middle moniker at the moment" Ross


Kip:

Email or send a private message and I'll send you some photos and/or drawings. Again, based on recommendations from instructors, operators and other students, I've been extremely proactive seeking opportunities to practice as well as promote myself locally doing Steadicam work that I feel qualified to do. As soon as I get a clip I think is okay, I just go look at some of the top pros shots and then I delete my clip and start over! After 28 years as a camera operator it's a bit anti-inuitive to start over but there is a learning curve and challenge to it that has been refreshing.

One thing I've done is to develop a relationship with a very reputable acting school that's here in Las Vegas. Their advanced students need more camera experience and I need actors and scenes to expedite building a demo reel. We're collaborating and creating scenes to shoot just the same as we would for a client; permits, crew; insurance included. I've invested in the equipment and education so it makes sense to invest in the practice and work to build a demo reel with scenes I might not otherwise be hired to shoot for quite some time and where we control the quality and time constraints. Luckily we have our own cameras, lighting and audio packages and a staff who is as excited about it as I am.

Best of luck to you!

Robert Starling
Las Vegas
  • 0




Wireless Video Systems

GPI Pro Systems

PLC Electronics Solutions

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

BOXX

PLC - Bartech

Ritter Battery

Paralinx LLC

Teradek

Boland Communications

Engineered Cinema Solutions

SkyDreams

Omnishot Systems

rebotnix Technologies

IDX

Betz Tools for Stabilizers

Varizoom Follow Focus