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few new guy questions


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#1 Brett Persons

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 01:10 AM

Hello everyone. The name's Brett and im completely new to the world of steadicam. I am very interested in the field and would like to ask a few questions that i feel are necessary. I would like to know from you guys that are trying to get into the field now, how difficult is it. Purchasing a rig, which i understand to be the only way to get into the field, will be the most expensive thing i have ever bought. I need to know, if i am going to buy one and start doing some things, how crowded is the market of steadicam operators? Are there hundreds of you guys all fighting for the same jobs? Do the guys that suck get weeded out quick or do they take the open spots up too?

Another topic. I live in Florida. My brother who is a steadicam operator in California says that he is pretty sure i could find a bit of work here but that i should ask around to know for sure. Anyone out here in FL that can give me a first hand account of trying to find work?

Any other advice that anyone can give me, or any things that you guys think a new guy that doesn't know much should know, im listening. Thanks all.

Brett Persons
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#2 Brett Persons

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 12:25 AM

its been a day and the post has 65 views. One of you 65 must have some sort of input for me. Again, any help would be greatly appreciated
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#3 Matt Burton

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 04:17 AM

Hey Bret,
First bit of advice is read the forum archives as much as possible, second bit of advice is take a workshop ASAP !

Can your brother not fill you in on all this ?
-matt
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#4 Brett Persons

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 01:03 PM

i could ask him questions, but im looking for a view from a struggling new guy, not a successful one. he probably can't even remember having to look for work like that. also he does not live in florida so he can't provide me with that viewpoint either.
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#5 WillArnot

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 02:10 PM

Brett,
I sense you are looking for that magic crystal ball, to see if your efforts and financial outlay will pay dividends. If any of us had access to it, we probably wouldn't be hanging out on this forum.

To compare = despair. Don't worry about what everyone else is doing. They are not you and therefore you are destined for your own special path.

You will have to find a way of determining if this current direction is best for you. The best way to start to answer that is to take Matt's suggestion and take a workshop. If you read the archives this will be the most common response.

If you are visually inclined, somewhat athletic, and willing to do whatever it takes, then Steadicam might be an avenue you will enjoy.

There are no free rides... and no crystal balls!

Will
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#6 Bryan Fowler

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 03:09 PM

Hi Brett,

Welcome to the forum.
I agree with Will and Matt. I would ask your brother about things that worked for him in CA, and adapt them to your market, and spend as much time as you can reading the posts. (just ignore the random rude, demeaning ones...=)

I'm in a small market. I think there is one, maybe two other rigs in my town. One to a company that hasn't used it more than 5 times in as many years, and the other belongs to a film school I'm friends with, and teach beginner steadicam at.

For me, I looked at my market, talked to people, production companys, and realised that I might have to show people what a steadicam does, how it can be worth the extra money, and go from there. I knew (know) that I won't retire from the work that will come out of east tennessee. But that works fine for me. I can do other work as well as steadicam, and might move to a larger market later on.

I bought my rig (a 10yr old EFP) from a friend, and have been making upgrades to it as the jobs bring in enough money to pay for them. It's one way to get going, and work into a nice rig if you don't want to drop $50-80K on equipment you are not totally sure how quickly work will come.

I've been to two workshops in 2 years, and learned LOTS both times. I'm still a beginner though. The rest of what I've learned has come from reading, messing up, and bugging more experienced operators, who surprisingly enough...became friends.=) *waves to friends*

Hope that helps some.
Bryan

BTW, 65 views might be a quick look, then a run to do something views. Not 65 deep contemplative views.
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#7 Brett Persons

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Posted 03 October 2006 - 01:31 PM

thanks for the replies everyone. i will continue trying to find information. if anyone else has anything to say please do, i will check back on this post frequently.

Brett Persons
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