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FCC using UHF channels in 2009?


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#1 Janice Arthur

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Posted 21 September 2006 - 12:04 PM

Hi all;

I've heard that the FCC (in the US) will be using UHF channels for the special Homeland Security
network in 2009.

Does anyone know more about this?

What channels?

I need to update my personal Modulus and I'm really trying to know a little more before I
invest any more.

(I already own Canatrans for rental, which I bought a couple of years ago.)

Janice
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#2 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

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Posted 21 September 2006 - 12:15 PM

Actually in '09 all analog TV transmissions in the US will be no longer.
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#3 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 21 September 2006 - 07:23 PM

Actually in '09 all analog TV transmissions in the US will be no longer.

They've said that many times before haven't they? I think the original date set for everyone to be broadcasting in HD was 1996....
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#4 Mikko Wilson

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Posted 22 September 2006 - 02:46 AM

Aah, HD and Digital are far from the same. All HDTV is Digital, but not all DigitalTV is HD.

Eric is correct that in the USA, Analog TV will be shut off in 2009 - Feb 19th 2009 to be precise.

After then, all stations may only broadcast a digital signal. That digital signal can be either SD or HD, the FCC doesn't care which, it just has to be Digital.

The move to digital TV frees up a lot of the UHF specturm, leaving the former UHF TV channel frequencies availble for other stuff. The FCC will auction off many of these frequencies and re-assign others. Major uses of the new frequencies are in deed some new Emergency frequencies for everything from local Fire/EMS to DHS. Other uses will be stuff like wireless internet, new cellphone services, etc...

At that point Analog TV will be dead in the USA, and that will cause a drop (end?) of manufacture of TVs with analog tuners. How this will effect wirless video on set is still unclear. Microwave may be the only way (As DigitalTV is complex and laggy)

Similar things are happening all over the world in other countries. Here in Finland analog TV goes away allready next August.

- Mikko
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#5 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 22 September 2006 - 07:33 AM

Aah, HD and Digital are far from the same. All HDTV is Digital, but not all DigitalTV is HD.

Eric is correct that in the USA, Analog TV will be shut off in 2009 - Feb 19th 2009 to be precise.

- Mikko

My point was that the US government often sets "deadlines", such as the HD broadcasting deadlines, and then just keeps pushing and pushing them for years and years. So, based on how well all of the other deadlines were followed, I seriously doubt that this particular deadline will be kept.
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#6 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

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Posted 22 September 2006 - 09:48 AM

I seriously doubt that this particular deadline will be kept.



This one will be kept. The auction process for the airwaves has already begun
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#7 Matt Petrosky

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Posted 22 September 2006 - 07:52 PM

Mikko is right, this may very well throw a monkey wrench in the world of wireless on-set video.

However, the consumer in me is only too happy to see another part of the seriously outdated crappy NTSC analog video world fade away. Good riddance.

-Matt
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#8 Kareem La Vaullee

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Posted 22 September 2006 - 08:32 PM

Aah, HD and Digital are far from the same. All HDTV is Digital, but not all DigitalTV is HD.

Hi Mikko,

It's not perfectly right

When I worked for Sony some 16 years ago we had Analog HD cameras and VCRs. I'm quiet sure they are still working somewhere, big impressive machines.

I will go thru my archives to come up with pictures if you want.

And it's written on the second line of Wikipedia's HD page : Wiki HDTV

K.
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#9 Janice Arthur

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Posted 23 September 2006 - 09:37 AM

Hi all;

I did a quick google search and found at least one interesting article.

Again it seems we're all right.

Check out; http://mixonline.com/mag/audio_hear_2/

The article says, in part;

"But in the brave new world of digital television, there is theoretically no adjacent-channel interference. So when all analog transmitters go off the air in February 2009 (which was originally supposed to happen by the end of this year, but broadcasters managed to get the schedule pushed back ? good thing, as hardly anyone I know actually owns a digital TV set), all those empty adjacent channels will now be usable. Rather than give those channels to other broadcasters, the FCC is going to shrink the UHF band, taking away everything above channel 51 and requiring existing broadcasters on those channels to move to the lower part of the band."

So, we don't loose all of it but its going to get a lot more crowded and lots of it is still up for grabs.

The article talks about wireless audio a lot but it's got a lot of content relating to the field.

I'm going to reread it.

JA
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#10 Charles Papert

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Posted 23 September 2006 - 11:57 AM

And it's not like the ability to transmit at a given frequency will suddenly be snatched out of the realm of possibility--all of our gear will still somehow produce an image after that date comes and goes! Eventually it will become harder to pick up a little handheld Casio TV at Radio Shack when you drop yours though.
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#11 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 24 September 2006 - 04:57 AM

(which was originally supposed to happen by the end of this year, but broadcasters managed to get the schedule pushed back ? good thing, as hardly anyone I know actually owns a digital TV set),
JA

Pushed back! Never! I'm shocked!

This one will be kept. The auction process for the airwaves has already begun

The auction process has begun many times on many things relating to government BS, but that doesn't mean squat. Maybe you're right, but I'm skeptical at the very least.
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#12 Mikko Wilson

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Posted 25 September 2006 - 03:53 AM

Aah, HD and Digital are far from the same. All HDTV is Digital, but not all DigitalTV is HD.

Hi Mikko,

It's not perfectly right

When I worked for Sony some 16 years ago we had Analog HD cameras and VCRs. I'm quiet sure they are still working somewhere, big impressive machines.

I will go thru my archives to come up with pictures if you want.

And it's written on the second line of Wikipedia's HD page : Wiki HDTV

K.


Eh, I was refering to current Broadcast TV standards. ;)

(I'm sure you know most if this bit K, but for the benefit of those who don't...)
Due to the bandwidth required for HD, it has to be a component signal to be practical, and you can't broadcast analog component (analog broadcasts are composite) as that woudl require 3 parallel broadcasts. Compoent and therfore HD can only be broadcast as a digtial signal, though it can still be cabled as analog using component cables. Lots of HD gear has Analog Compoent outputs - though with the demands of DRM, those are dissapearing in favor of the (digital) HDMI connection in the consumer world. Analog HD is alive and well in the Steadicam world with many cameras supplying a Analog Component HD signal, and many HD Steadicam monitors having both analog HD component and digital HD-SDI inputs.

- Mikko
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#13 thomas-english

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Posted 28 September 2006 - 06:17 AM

agreed the US often delays/thwarts radio tech. , take the digital mobile network used everywhere else in the world, you guys still have "cell" phones..

In england we are advancing pretty quickly towards digital TV. One solution when everything gets sold off/used up channel wise is to use the European mapped canatrans in the US and the US mapped canatrans in the Europe (i.e. use the Ntsc model in Pal land and the Pal model in ntsc land) since the frequencies are different you ll have less interference from the pesky firemen trying to save someones life.

So we will be fine to use modulus's here for ages.. so long as the DTi don t catch us and put us in shackles.
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