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YESSSSS i have got him


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#1 Rob Paludanus

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Posted 14 September 2006 - 06:40 PM

Hello,
A brandnew newbie here :-)
I just have bought a secondhand SK2, first i want to start leaning with a xl1s later i will try to use it with the jvc dv5000.
Before i start taking lessons i think i will have to start training my back, it hurts like hell.

a question for the dutch guys here, what is the Pendulum(-effect)?

Advice is alway's welcome.

Rob.
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#2 Bryan Fowler

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Posted 14 September 2006 - 08:26 PM

Hi Rob,

congrats on a new rig.
I'd recommend a workshop straightaway. The SK2 is a smaller rig, and if it's hurting your back, you need to make some adjustments soon before you hurt something, or form them into a habit. With good form, and a healthy back you can fly cameras 3-4 times as heavy as an XL-1, and feel fine after a day's work. (in my opinion)

If you can't get to a workshop, arrange to meet an operator in your area, see if he'll spend some time with you. Offer to pay him if you can afford it. It will be well worth the money. (as long as he doesn't make fun of
you, and talk constantly about what he's done and how good he is *grin* )

I'm not Dutch, but when you say pendulum, do you mean in relation to steadicam, or is it a night club in Utrecht? =)

Good luck!

Oh, it's a requirement here on the forum to put your first and last name. I'm sure someone will nicely tap you on the shoulder and let you know how easy it is to change your login name to have them both.

Bryan
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#3 Rob Paludanus

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Posted 15 September 2006 - 09:17 AM

Hi Bryan,

Thanks for your answers and advice, and no i don t mean the nightclub in utrecht :-) and yes in relation with steadicam ;-).
I will start looking around to take lessons, because you are right about makin it an habit.
Thanks again,
Rob
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#4 JobScholtze

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Posted 15 September 2006 - 10:43 AM

Sk2 hmmmm, old times, old times. I live in the Netherlands and have many storys about myself to tell :P
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#5 Michael Binder

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Posted 15 September 2006 - 11:17 AM

@job

is saw your photos and was surprised what kind of jobs you did with your sk2. i had the sk2 too, but was not really able to make good live-jobs because of the weight of our camers (Ikegami HL-57 with wireless).
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#6 Carl Perkins

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Posted 15 September 2006 - 11:19 AM

I started out my steadicam career with an SK rig. I mostly worked with Betacam cameras, but did work with a few XL1's on independent film projects. The XL1 camera doesn't weigh enough to activate the arm springs. If you don't already have a weight cage or other means of adding weight to the camera, it will be hard to operate properly. Also make sure your vest is adjusted for a proper, snug fit. A loose or improperly adjusted vest can add much pain to operating.
The pendulum effect is when the sled base swings (like a pendulum) when you are operating. If the sled is balanced properly and operated properly the sled should stay vertical while you are operating.
If you can take a class, you will learn all this much faster. You just have to keep practicing, it takes time to be a good steadicam operator.
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#7 Rob Paludanus

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Posted 16 September 2006 - 12:27 AM

I started out my steadicam career with an SK rig. I mostly worked with Betacam cameras, but did work with a few XL1's on independent film projects. The XL1 camera doesn't weigh enough to activate the arm springs. If you don't already have a weight cage or other means of adding weight to the camera, it will be hard to operate properly. Also make sure your vest is adjusted for a proper, snug fit. A loose or improperly adjusted vest can add much pain to operating.
The pendulum effect is when the sled base swings (like a pendulum) when you are operating. If the sled is balanced properly and operated properly the sled should stay vertical while you are operating.
If you can take a class, you will learn all this much faster. You just have to keep practicing, it takes time to be a good steadicam operator.


Thanks Carl,

I kan put on an anton bauwer battery and the MA-200 Shoulderlean/pad (shity english sorry) that adds about 1 - 1,5 Kg to the xl1s, do you think that will do?
I heard about the pendulum effect and about the 2,5 seconds by Erik and i must admit i havent even been there yet :-)
I am shure i want to take a class in the near future.
And most important i am willing to give it time;-)
Thanks again for the great advice !
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#8 JobScholtze

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Posted 16 September 2006 - 03:51 AM

@job

is saw your photos and was surprised what kind of jobs you did with your sk2. i had the sk2 too, but was not really able to make good live-jobs because of the weight of our camers (Ikegami HL-57 with wireless).

Most of the times, i had to push the rig up, cose the arm was failing. Dynamic balance, no way, but it worked at the time for me.
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#9 Carl Perkins

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Posted 18 September 2006 - 11:41 AM

[/quote]

I kan put on an anton bauwer battery and the MA-200 Shoulderlean/pad (shity english sorry) that adds about 1 - 1,5 Kg to the xl1s, do you think that will do?

[/quote]

Rob,

I can't remember exactly how much weight is needed to get the springs in the arm to start working, but I think you need for the camera and stuff at the top of the sled to be at least 10 pounds ( I don't know the kg conversion). As long as the arm springs are being stretched and the arm can sit at a near parallel to the ground it should be good.
Also, have a friend help you to try different vest adjustments until it is like a part of your body and that will rtake a lot of pain out of operating. It is hard to adjust the vest yourself while wearing it, so find someone willing to tighten it as you wear it.
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#10 Rob Paludanus

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Posted 03 October 2006 - 11:05 PM

Thanks again Carl!
I tryed it with the anton bauwer and with the spring almost on its lightest stand(?) and as far as i can see its works just fine now.
I hope the weather changes soon because than i can start practising for real B)

Rob
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