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Sled (and arm) for F900


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#1 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 13 July 2006 - 09:20 PM

I wasn't sure where to ask this exactly, but I am interested in getting a Steadicam sled and arm that is capable of carrying an F900. I was looking at a used ProVid sled and arm, but it is apparently only rated for around 24lbs. Is that an arm issue only or does the weight on the sled have something to do with the limitation as well? If I switched out for a higher rated arm, could I get away with that sled?

I don't want to invest in a completely new system as I haven't been making a career out of Steadicam operating. I'd just like to have it available for when I could use it or "suggest" it to a producer. Any suggestions? Input? Thank you!

Brian Dzyak
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#2 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 12:20 AM

I wasn't sure where to ask this exactly, but I am interested in getting a Steadicam sled and arm that is capable of carrying an F900. I was looking at a used ProVid sled and arm, but it is apparently only rated for around 24lbs. Is that an arm issue only or does the weight on the sled have something to do with the limitation as well? If I switched out for a higher rated arm, could I get away with that sled?



No, not gonna happen, When I flew the "Sony Valdeze" it was 44" long and 44lbs. That's the camera with a cine style zoom, clip on mattebox, 2 lens motors, the 901 box and the telecast fiber interface. If I left the Telecast off the camera would be 40" and 42lbs....

The other problem is post length, If I remember correctly the post was somewhere north of 3 foot long

To paraphrase Brody from "Jaws" Your gonna need a bigger rig
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#3 Carl Perkins

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 01:52 AM

I have an arm that will carry up to 45 pounds and I have it set at about 30-35 pounds when I use the F900. If you are using the F900 with a video zoom lens, mattebox, HD-NTSC converter and 1 lens control motor and don't have a battery on the camera (battery on bottom of sled). To determine if the arm will carry the weight you also have to factor in the weight of the sled with the battery and monitor. It should be possible to use the Provid sled, but you may need to get a stronger arm. I don't know the details of the Provid system, but I have carried the F900 a few times. It is just a little heavier than a betacam.

Carl Perkins
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#4 JamieSilverstein

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 04:23 AM

When I have used the 900 with a video zoom etc., it generally weighs in at around 37lbs.. It is even heavier with a Panni zoom on it.
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#5 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 08:47 AM

The last time I weighed the camera, it came in around 44 pounds with the 6 lb battery attached. My shoulder can attest to it. The Digibeta I use (not as often anymore) is in the mid-twenties or so.

Thank you for your replies!

Brian Dzyak
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#6 Erwin Landau

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 02:10 PM

It depends on what style productions you work on.

An ENG style F-900 is not that heavy, even with the wide angle zoom, Microwave Transmitter, 904 Box, etc.
The moment we start talking about single camera Cine style TV or Movie productions... that changes very quickly very drastically.

Heavy modification from the rental house and Cine style accessories will push you way into a "Film style" rig/setup.

The arm is the main factor in supporting your rig... BUT don't neglect the added stress onto you and the rest of the equipment.

The Provid Vest and Rig are not designed to support and handle that additional weight. The Vest padding and the design where not put in place to comfortably support it. The Gimbal was designed to handle a straight forward Betacam not a CineAlta monster.

That's why there are different Steadicam models that are rated for different Camera weights...

That's why I stress to think ahead and over buy slightly to accommodate a wider range. You can always go lighter (add weight to the light camera) but rarely heavier (lets cut the deck from that monster to make it lighter)...


Just my 2 cents.


Erwin
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#7 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 10:53 PM

It depends on what style productions you work on.

An ENG style F-900 is not that heavy, even with the wide angle zoom, Microwave Transmitter, 904 Box, etc.
The moment we start talking about single camera Cine style TV or Movie productions... that changes very quickly very drastically.


Erwin



Thanks, Erwin. I shoot mostly EFP style, not cine. Body, lens, clip on matte box, 901 back, and anton bauer comes to about 26lbs. Usually I'd have to add an RF receiver as well. (bizarre because I swear I weighed it a couple months ago and I thought it was much heavier...I'll double check on the original scale next week).

As far as the phrase "not that heavy," relatively speaking, I guess not, but tell that to my shoulder!
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#8 Carl Perkins

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Posted 15 July 2006 - 12:31 AM

Brian,

When I use a light video camera I put a battery on the camera and one at ther bottom of my sled, but when using a heavy video camera like the F900 I don't use a battery on the camera. You can just have a battery or two on the bottom of the sled and a 12v 4 pin will supply power to the camera from the battery down below. The battery is still a part of the weight consideration, but it is part of the sled weight not the camera weight.
When weighing the video camera for steadicam use you can weigh it without the battery on the camera. Then weigh your sled with the battery or batteries. Use this weight combination to determine if your arm, gimbal and vest are adequate for the combined weight.
As Erwin said, it is always better to have a system that won't be maxed out with the camera you will be using.

Carl
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#9 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 25 October 2006 - 10:30 PM

Thanks for the advice from everyone. :)

With Kyle's help at Tiffen, I picked up a used ProVid they had laying around and put an F900R up successfully. I'm heading out for a 2 month European gig, but when I get back, I'll throw the F900 on there and see what happens.
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#10 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 11 November 2006 - 01:46 AM

Here's a pic of me with the F900R on the ProVid. It all works quite well and I've been getting some great shots with it so far.

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