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Malibu 04' Workshop


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#1 David Allen Grove

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Posted 04 March 2004 - 04:51 PM

Here is a picture of a "Student" at the Malibu Workshop March 04'
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#2 David Allen Grove

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Posted 04 March 2004 - 04:52 PM

Look at Dan Kneece go!
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#3 WillArnot

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Posted 05 March 2004 - 02:49 AM

That's a cool Hitch seat for hard mounting. Goes straight into the square stock trailer hitch? Any issues with play? Any need to triangulate the rig from the hitch? Who makes those?

Thanks

Will Arnot
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#4 guillermo nespolo

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Posted 05 March 2004 - 08:31 AM

im not siting in that thing thanks
guillermo " realy have a bad experince on trunks" nespolo
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#5 Michael Stumpf

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Posted 05 March 2004 - 10:26 AM

That's a cool Hitch seat for hard mounting. Goes straight into the square stock trailer hitch? Any issues with play? Any need to triangulate the rig from the hitch? Who makes those?

Thanks

Will Arnot

Will, I was thinking that VERY thing. Just about posted the same questions, but then decided I read the other responses first. Good thing.

I've been on several shoots where something like this would of been fantastic, but ended up doing something else (like sitting on the tailgate, strapped in with a grip holding on instead. Wasn't perfect.

I'd love to know who makes this thing, and if it's for sale or rent too?

Michael
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#6 David Allen Grove

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Posted 05 March 2004 - 02:34 PM

Well, I'll try to give a little history behind it as well as what it's good for and what it's NOT good for.

This Rickshaw/Vehicle mount was made back in 1997 by a bicycle shop owner by the name of Jack Davis, he's a super nice guy. He is the owner of Irwin's bike shop in Des Moines Iowa.

To make a very long story as short as I possibly can, I asked (I think her name was Kathy) at the SOA to take some snap shots of their rickshaw because I wanted to have my own. I lived in Iowa and well, how many rickshaws are in Iowa not to mention steadicams right?

I took these pictures to Irwin's bike shop in hopes of finding the same style tires that the SOA Rickshaw had. I showed them to Jack, he looked at the pictures and said, "You know, I could probably make this for you." Three weeks later he wheels out my new Rickshaw! A ray of light shined on it when he brought it out! Aaaaahhh. (ok, not really, but it was the same feeling) This wasn't bad considering he did this in his spare time and he was extremely busy time for the bike shop.

Then a steadicam operator overseas asked about having one built but having the ability to pull it behind a vehicle.. (in rickshaw mode) I asked Garrett via email about this and he said it wasn't a good idea.. which I agreed.
Then I took it back to Jack and he suggested making an attachment that fits into the back of a 2 inch square hitch and well, the rest is history.

I told him a looong time ago that there might be great interest in this and he said he might be interested in producing them but he would have to have a lot of orders in order for him to do it. (He has to buy material in bulk.)

I don't know if he would be interested in making any more or if he even remebers me but I'd be willing to get a hold of him and ask him if he would like to make more. Just let me know.

Right now Tom Gleason and his machinist friend are building a dual caster wheel
which will go towards the front of the rickshaw for more stability. I'll keep everyone posted on the mod. Should be pretty awesome when it's finished.


NOW What the rickshaw is Good for and what it isn't good for. (hmm, sounds familiar doesn't it?)

The Rickshaw in, well... Rickshaw mode, is great for really slow moving precise shots. It's great for low mode, child or animal POV. It's great for really fast moving chase scenes. It's also very nice at the end of an 18 hour day when you are just plain exhausted but they still want you to operate steadicam. Like Garrett always says, why wear it if you can mount it?

In Vehicle Mount mode, I've used it for several marathons. It's good to use in a tracking shot, for example somone running down a side walk at a fast rate of speed. It's awesome for low mode. You can kiss the lens on the street if you want and you are doing it COMFORTABLY. I did this tracking shot, Low mode within an inch off the street. Bicycle pedals come into frame, houses in the background are going by, boom/Tilt up to the handle bars... we pull away as I reveal the woman on the bike... ahhhh. what a thing of beauty! Not the woman, the shot. The woman was cute too but.. the shot was just awesome. Still waiting to get that footage. (finger tap tap tap)

The Vehicle mount is good for FLAT surface shooting and at LOW SPEEDs. I've NEVER gone over 30MPH in it. If you are going faster than that YOU SHOULD USE A CAMERA BIKE with a driver that knows what he or she is doing. It's NOT good for off road, uneven terrain.. this is also true for the rickshaw mode. It should be on a FLAT SMOOTH SURFACE.

The vechile mount sits somewhat lose in the hitch. It does move around somewhat when it's NOT under load. However, once a person is in it and the steadicam is attached, it sits solid. I feel very safe in it.

Having said that my Rickshaw/Vehicle Mount is for rent in the LA area for $150/day.

Here are some photos of the rickshaw vehicle mount if you guys just want to make your own... http://www.geocities...ckshawpics.html
Some photos of the Rickshaw in action.. http://www.geocities...colorphoto.html
If either link says it's unavailable that means too many people are accessing the site at the same time. Give it an hour or so and then try to access it again.

If you have any more questions, or would like to take a test drive (bring your own gear and I'll drive) Let me know... I'd be more than happy to show it to you.

Just call or email.
davidgrove@steadicamoperator.com
cell 323-385-3456
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#7 Ari Gertler

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Posted 05 March 2004 - 02:54 PM

I have used his Davids's Rickshaw on the ground and attached to the back of a vehicle and it works great. When sitting in the rickshaw you are able to get OVER 180 degrees of movement with the Steadicam rig. It makes shooting profile from a moving vehicle simple, since the Steadicam rig is a couple of feet behind the vehicle it is mounted to (clear field of view). Great for shooting profile of a person running, a bike or a car then following it as it slows and makes lane changes behind and around you. I felt safe and secure, and did not notice any slack or wiggling. You can always add rachet straps and don't forget that the the driver is one of the most important pieces of the equation. I would always like to have a Grip in the back near me in case I need a pair of hands in an emergency.
Side Note: When I am shooting from a vehicle (except for the Shot Maker) I have found it neccessary to include the total weight of all the people and the gear when we are test driving the route looking for any issues that may come up (potholes, incline, etc.). You can notice in the photos that the pickup is sitting lower in the back since there is so much overhang weight. Lets hypothetically say that the photo was a rehersal run, but when picture is up, the 1st AC, and a Grip will usually be in the bed near me. The Director, DP or Scripty may want to sit in the crew cab with a monitor, or worse and less safe, they want to sit in the bed of the truck, There is a very good chance that the vehicle could unexpectedly bottom out causing pain and damage.

I really like that David's rig gives more options to the production. It works great as a standard rickshaw on the ground, and then can be quickly mounted to a vehicle for shots that need a little more speed.
Ari Gertler
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#8 Mitch Gross

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Posted 05 March 2004 - 04:28 PM

The vechile mount sits somewhat lose in the hitch. It does move around somewhat when it's NOT under load. However, once a person is in it and the steadicam is attached, it sits solid. I feel very safe in it.

I would think a couple of metal shims tapped into the space between the hitch * hitch receiver would lock things in place nicely. A wad or two of Gaffer tape would keep them from working their way loose.
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#9 David Allen Grove

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Posted 05 March 2004 - 05:59 PM

I really like that David's rig gives more options to the production. It works great as a standard rickshaw on the ground, and then can be quickly mounted to a vehicle for shots that need a little more speed.
Ari Gertler

What a great review and I didn't even pay him!
(as I slip Ari an imaginary $20 bill under the imaginary table).

I completely forgot to mention the setup time! Well under 2 minutes of setup time for this vehicle mount.

I found a couple of photos of Ari using the Rickshaw/mount! This was like... 2 years ago!?!?
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#10 David Allen Grove

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Posted 05 March 2004 - 06:04 PM

Or you can mount it this way...
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#11 David Allen Grove

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Posted 05 March 2004 - 06:05 PM

Another view.
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#12 Ari Gertler

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Posted 08 March 2004 - 05:58 PM

David,
Thanks for posting the photos. I have not seen those before, and I almost forgot what I looked like with all that hair. It sure is nice to have a buzz cut on a day like today in Los Angeles, 90 plus degrees!!!!!!
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#13 maxgutierrez

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Posted 11 March 2004 - 10:14 PM

When will the next workshop in Malibu/Southern California be held?
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#14 Ruben Sluijter

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Posted 12 March 2004 - 12:30 AM

When will the next workshop in Malibu/Southern California be held?

Damn, give us a chance to regain our strength after the last one man.... :blink:

Anyway, you might want to check out www.steadicam.com or www.steadicam-ops.com for workshop info.
Or you could try contacting Frank Rush (contact info is somewhere on this site) and I'm sure he can tell you more.

Peace, Ruben "Sign up for the Malibu Steadicam Sweatshop or else...!" Sluijter
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#15 TJ Williams

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Posted 05 June 2004 - 12:10 AM

Have also built a vehicle hard mount. Maybe some folks would want to roll their own. works in the back of my van. local trailer hitch guys welded it up out of steel. Kinda heavy but will never fail. Just used 2" square steel tube in an L with a web at the joint. It only goes out from the hitch enough to clear the bumper coming up. a set of holes up the tube for mounting the plate which holds a socket block. There are foot pegs right at the joint of the L there is a second tube inside the vertical tube which slides up and locks with a bolt threaded thru the side of the vertical tube to hold the van rear lid up there is a split tennis ball on top of the inner vertical pipe to keep from damaging the upholstery. The slight wobble from the hitch is damped by the lid.
To operate I sit on the rear floor of the van with one arm around either side of the pole and harnessed into the van in climbing harness to the seat belts. advantages are>
1. less wind on the rig since we are very close to the back of the vehicle
2. director and driver are easy to talk to
3. since we don'tstick out the back so far the risk of failure is less and would only wreck the rig not me since I'm attached to the van not supported by the rig.
3. Since we don't stick out the back so far the risk of bottoming out behind the vehicle
is very small.

Shot a road pilot in the sawtooths about Hot rods and motorcycles and cruised the freeway with choppers at about 85 for a show about Sturgis. Have run it on grass
and dirt with pretty good results. If you are far from a place to rent one maybe you are close to a good trailer hitch welder!
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