Jump to content



Photo

BBC - RULES


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Buster Arrieta

Buster Arrieta

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 63 posts
  • Bogotá D.C. - Colombia

Posted 23 May 2006 - 07:44 PM

SAFETY RULES

NEVER EVER TOUCH the Steadicam or operator.


DO NOT PUSH the Steadicam operator to make him/her go faster.
DO NOT PULL on the Steadicam operator (unless you are the spotter
and you have both worked out the shot)
Do Not Grab the post or touch the monitor to adjust the framing for the
Steadicam operator. Simply ask the operator to adjust the framing... the
operator will be more than happy to do it for you.

The rig is extremely heavy not to mention extremely expensive
and the operator has to balance up to 100 lbs of gear on his/her body.
If someone touches the any part of the Steadicam or operator, it throws the entire
operator's balance off and can quickly fatique the operator because they have to
use muscles to compensate for the balance shift.

Give the operator a chance to rest between takes.
Steadicam Oerators are only humans, we are, "Dollies that Bleed" and
we get tired... eventually.
Remember, the operator is holding a very heavy piece of equipment.
If the operator isn't shooting, he shouldn't be standing around for
long periods of time with the Steadicam mounted.
It just wears the operator out faster and the shots could get sloppy.

If you have any questions regarding these safety rules and guidelines please email us
and we'll be happy to go into further detail.

THANK YOU! for observing these Steadicam safety rules!




Health, Safety and Security - Steadicam
Universal / USA - BBC Requirements
The Steadicam and similar camera mounting systems enable smooth tracking shots to be achieved in circumstances where a track and dolley would be either impossible or impractical e.g. flights of stairs, sports stadia. The system is designed for smooth moving shots not static shots.
Fully loaded the Steadicam weighs in excess of 40kg

Steadicam operators need to be competent and physically fit. Steadicam operators must be adequately trained in the safe use of the Steadicam and how to inspect the rig. The Steadicam training will include safe use including shooting on stairs, identifying hazards including those that might arise from production changes, how to balance the rig for comfort for each shoot and lessons learned from incidents.
Guidance...

For each production the person in charge of the steadicam activity to carry out a risk assessment e.g. Resources or Engineering Manager (EM), Camera Supervisor, Producer, or Production Unit Manager.
The operator should be consulted to contribute to the assessment to help specify the rig and check the location.
The assessment will take account of:
? the coverage needed,
? the fitness, training and experience of the operator for the particular task;
? the rest periods needed and the support the operator will require;
? the length of the working day.
Guidance...

The assessment will also need to cover;
? the location;
? the type of Steadicam rig/camera
? the ground conditions;
? the weather conditions.
Guidance...

The assessment will be recorded and shared with the operator as well as contributing to the overall programme risk assessment.
The Steadicam system consists of a Stabilizer Support Arm attached to a Camera Operator?s Vest at one end, and at the other end to a "floating" Camera Mounting Assembly (also known as the ?sled?) which accepts a film or video camera.
The operator will check that the rig is in good order for the shoot.
Guidance...

Guidance
Competence and Fitness to use Steadicams
The Steadicam training will include safe use including how to inspect the rig, shooting on stairs, identifying hazards including those that might arise from production changes, how to balance the rig for comfort for each shoot and lessons learned from incidents.
Steadicam operators who are staff are assessed for physical capability prior to training and will be in a health surveillance programme.
Staff who have been on sick leave will be referred to the Medical Officer prior to return to steadicam operations.
There is an increased risk to health if the operator is pregnant, breastfeeding or has recently given birth. They should be referred to the BBC Medical Officer on the suitability to continue / return to Steadicam operations.




Guidance
Planning the task
The Steadicam rig is extremely heavy (over 40kgs). The length of time it is worn, the distance that the operator is asked to cover and the coverage that is needed will all help to determine the number of operators, assistants and relief operators needed.
For sports like football, rugby league, etc. the distance covered by an operator should be limited, e.g. corner flag to half way to centre line. The rig should be rested at such times as the play is at the other end of the field.
Steadicams should not be used to cover sportsmen/women running fast , however fit the operator it is impossible to sprint carrying over 40 kg this type of shot should be carried out differently, (e.g. on a mobile mount.).
The operator and Resources Manager will determine the rest time needed. Adequate rest periods (for guidance, a rest period of 15 minutes should be taken after every 15 minutes operation) and, wherever possible, the Steadicam should be taken off, or at least the weight supported, when not actually in use.
An assistant working with the operator who is aware of the operational needs will help facilitate the rest periods in addition to watching the operator?s back, providing support, and logistics. They are likely to need radio talkback for operator and the assistant.


Guidance
Assessing the risk
During the planning stages the operator should be consulted to agree the Steadicam model suitable for the task, the environment and the coverage needed. The equipment can vary in mass and the type of model specified has a bearing on the time the rig may be safely worn.
The operator should also assess the proposed location at an early stage e.g. at a technical recce. If this is not practical prior to the production date and they must be given sufficient time on the rig day, for such an assessment to be made. This will include a walk-through, without the rig on, to identify any potential hazards and further controls needed.
The equipment and the task may cause dehydration so a good supply of rehydration drink will be needed. Therefore water, a folding seat and shade as appropriate must be made available to the operator close to where they are working.
Hand gloves, Knee and Elbow pads should be worn at all times.
Footwear should be appropriate to the ground conditions.





Guidance
The Steadicam
The Vest
The vest should be in good order and correctly adjusted to fit the operator. This is most important as the whole weight of the rig is distributed about the body via the vest.
The quick release mechanism should not be obstructed and should be easy to operate with the rig on.
The Arm
Once the arm is on the vest it should be controlled by the operator holding the sled locating pin at all times - the arm is able to swing very freely. This ensures protection for the operator and the general public.
The Sled
The camera should be securely mounted to the sled and balanced in all directions.
The balancing must be carried out on a stand of the correct size and height for the operator to engage the sled onto the arm easily and without undue bending of the back.
The sled should be checked for any signs of damage especially around the monitor and the gimbal.



HEALTH AND SAFETY
STEADICAM

Important notice.

These note are purely for Joemacs own use and are suggestions to help our jib work go safely. The notes are not all encompassing. Please refer to HSE website for more comprehensive information.

Steadicam
Joemac LTD takes as its benchmark the BBC guidelines for safe operating of Steadicam
Steadicam Guidelines

Risk Assessment Operational Factors The Operator
Operator Responsibilities The Steadicam Safety Equipment
Training Physical Assessment Routine Health Surveillance
Introduction
After wide consultation throughout, the BBC has produced the following document as a Guideline for use in Steadicam operations.
The Steadicam system consists of a Stabilizer Support Arm attached to a Camera Operator?s Vest at one end, and at the other end to a "floating" Camera Mounting Assembly (also known as the ?sled?) which accepts a film or video camera.
The use of Steadicams is a developing field and makes things possible that previously were not. However, as with all new technology, they bring with them certain problems that need addressing, such as the duration and location of operation and the fitness and long term health of the operator.

Risk Assessment
The activities involved in the use of Steadicams must be subject to a RISK ASSESSMENT before any shoot can occur. This assessment must take account of these Operational Factors:-
the location,
the organisation and the requirements of the task,
the Steadicam camera
the ground conditions
There should be an initial walk through, without rig on, to assess the feasibility of Steadicam use, and to identify any hazards that may be encountered during the shoot. In particular, the ground conditions should be evaluated.
The Risk Assessment Form will be a record identifying the Hazards and Risks and the control measures to reduce the risks to an acceptable level.

RESPONSIBILITY FOR RISK ASSESSMENT
This is the responsibility of the person in charge (e.g. Engineering Manager (EM), Producer, Production Unit Manger) the operator should be consulted and involved in this assessment, if possible.

Operational Factors
Where practical the, operator should use an assistant whose responsibilities are to keep the operator safe and act as the gopher, i.e. make sure that the stand is close by and to fetch the batteries.
It is important to bear in mind that the operator is carrying 29 kg and should be given adequate rest periods and wherever possible, provision should be made for the Steadicam to be taken off or, if not, the weight supported when not actually in use. The duration of wearing should be as short as practical.
When used to cover sporting events ideally there should be 2 operators for sports like football, rugby league, etc. If not then the distance covered should be limited, i.e. corner flag to half way to centre line. It should be possible to rest the rig at such times as the play is at the other end.
Steadicams should not be used to cover people running fast because, however fit the operator is, he will still be carrying 29 kg and therefore cannot be as fast as the subject. The shot should be carried out differently, e.g. on a mobile mount.
Remember a good Steadicam operator likes to make the kit look light and easy, it isn?t.

The Operator
All applicants for steadicam operations must be assessed for physical capability & medical factors by Occupational Health. See Appendix A
All operators must be adequately trained in the safe use of the Steadicam & how to inspect the rig.
There is an increased risk to new Steadicam operators due to the lack of operational experience.
There is an increased risk to health if the operator is pregnant, breastfeeding or has recently given birth. They should be referred to the BBC Medical Officer on the suitability to continue / return to steadicam operations.
Staff who have been off on long term sick will be referred to the Medical Officer prior to return to steadicam operations.

Operator Responsibilities
The ultimate decision on the safety of the shoot rests with the operator.
The operator must:
make sure that the rig is in good order and that (s)he is happy with what they are being asked to do.
if s(he) is unhappy with the conditions or the shoot inform the Producer, Unit Manager, EM of his / her concerns and talk them through.
have care for other workers involved in the shoot.
report any faults with the equipment to the relevant department for rectification as soon as practically possible.

Client responsibility
We will insist an oral announcement is made at appropriate time to the whole crew, talent and public as to possible dangers of the Steadicam. This responsibility we may insist to be taken on by the Producer/ 1st AD/ Floor Manager.
Announcement to include references to
d. Crew and public to be hyper aware of the Steadicam ability to be anywhere, often unexpected, in space.
e. Only the Steadicam crew members to put on or take off anything from the Steadicam. Including batteries, microphones, lights, tape cassettes, film mags
f. Crew and talent ( not public ) must take steps to ensure their own Health and safety when working with the Steadicam.
Client must not encourage our operators to perform anything dangerous.
Client must not assume Joemac will take care of Clients Health and safety and must assume some responsibility for their own workforce.
Where needed Client should provide adequate security to ensure Public and other dangers cannot access the Steadicam and operator.
Client may need to supply fencing or structure to enable the above.
Client to agree that the on site Steadicam operators decision is final as regards Health and Safety matters concerning the Steadicam.
Client to allow adequate time for rigging and de rigging and not to put pressure on our Steadicam operators to work quicker than is deemed safe by our operators
Client should try to ensure a reconnaissance of the site is made with the Steadicam operator or representative prior to work day to pre empt any Health and Safety problems.
Client will not ask our operators to work in environments that may have adverse effects on their Health and Safety. Examples of this may by excessive noise, polluted air,
If this cannot be avoided Client must ensure adequate steps are taken to lessen the risks. Ear defenders. Clothing. Masks
Client to ensure adequate lighting for rigging and de rigging of the Steadicam.
Where the Steadicam operator feels it is necessary client should provide one or more competent spotters or cable bashers or others to ensure safe operation of Steadicam and operator


The Steadicam
The Vest
The vest should be in good order and correctly adjusted to fit the operator. This is most important as the whole weight of the rig is distributed about the body via the vest.
The quick release mechanism should not be obstructed and should be easy to operate with the rig on.
The Arm
Once the arm is on the vest it should be controlled by the operator holding the sled locating pin at all times - the arm is able to swing very freely. This ensures protection for the operator and the general public.
The Sled
The camera should be securely mounted to the sled and balanced in all directions.
The balancing must be carried out on a stand of the correct size and height for the operator to engage the sled onto the arm easily and without undue bending of the back.
The sled should be checked for any signs of damage especially around the monitor and the gimbal.
The Shoot
Reference should be made to the Risk Assessment before proceeding.

Safety Equipment
Knee and Elbow pads should be worn at all times.
Footwear - should be appropriate to the ground conditions.
These will be provided by the operator?s management, under the requirements of Health and Safety Legislation.

Training
Operators will be given appropriate training in the use and operation of Steadicam including shooting on stairs. It is particularly important that they learn to balance the rig properly so as to give maximum possible comfort during operation of the equipment. Operators will be shown the Risk Assessment Form and will be informed of the significant findings and controls which are to be implemented. They will be instructed in the identification of any potential hazards and particularly those that might arise from production changes. The training will be reviewed to take into account any previously recorded incidents.

Physical Assessment
New operators should perform a 50 metre brisk walk while wearing the rig and general capability will be assessed by the trainer ? who is an experienced Steadicam operator.

Routine Health Surveillance
Existing staff who operate Steadicams can be referred to the Occupational Health Department for the treatment of work related problems, or for general advice
Health surveillance will be carried out in the first two years of an individual?s operation of steadicam equipment. Any operator who believes they are suffering ill effects from operating the equipment will be referred to Occupational Health Department.

Appendix A
Pre Placement Health Assessment For Steadicam Operators
The Steadicam harness and associated equipment weighs in total some 29 kg. The equipment is strapped to the body for support and, by nature, the operator will be walking or running in the harness whilst filming. There are therefore greater physical demands on the operator for Steadicam work than for most other camera work. The following health check is designed to check that operators are in good health before undertaking this work.
The nurse will ask questions about your past and current health and perform a simple examination. If the results are outside those in the guidance then you will be referred to the BBC doctor for an assessment and decision on your fitness to undertake the work.
Name: M/F
Date of Birth:
BBC No:
Department:
Job Title:
MEDICAL HISTORY - Is there a history of the following?


1. Back or spine surgery e.g. laminectomy Yes q No q
2. Significant sickness absence related to spine problems Yes q No q
3. Significant hip problems e.g. arthritis congenital deformity Yes q No q
4. Knee surgery or ligament/cartilage problems Yes q No q
5. Upper limb problems e.g. tenosynovitis, ULD, Tennis elbow Yes q No q
6. Hypertension Yes q No q
7. Myocardial infarction Yes q No q
8. Diabetes Yes q No q
9. Epilepsy/fits or unexplained loss of consciousness Yes q No q
Notes:


EXAMINATION
Height Weight
(Height in metres)1

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
BMI Refer if BMI >31
(Weight in Kg)
Pulse Refer if irregular or >95bpm after resting
Blood Pressure Refer if diastolic > 95 after resting
Urine Glucose
Protein
Blood Refer if abnormal
Lumbar spine movements: Refer if abnormal
Cervical spine movements Refer if abnormal
Notes:
OUTCOME
Health Assessment Passed q Refer to M.O. q
Signed (nurse) Print Name
Date:
1 To be assessed by 2 current operators and Dr. Colin Thomas
One copy of sheet to medical notes, one to originator


Reply slip
Name: Date:
The above has been seen today for a steadicam health check with the following result:
Health Assessment Passed q Refer to M.O. q
Signed

Appendix B
Pre Placement Physical Assessment For
Steadicam Operators
Introduction:
This assessment is applied to new entrants for Steadicam, in order to comply with the Health and Safety Policy of the BBC. This is compulsory.
Medical Test:-
This test is a requirement prior to the physical test.
The Nursing Officer has the responsibility in the Occupational Health Department for blood, urine and checking the appropriate medical questionnaire.
Physical Test:-
This is a simple test taking no more than 5 minutes with minimal requirements to establish the endurance of the musculo-skeletal system.
Standing
The participant will be asked to stand for 3 minutes with the full Steadicam rig on.
No appreciable distress/discomfort should be experienced during this time.
Walking
The participant will be asked to walk 50 metres briskly. During the walk the participant will be requested to look into monitor on the rig.
The participant should be able to communicate immediately after the walk without being breathless.
Responsibilities:-
The test will be the responsibility of management and two people must accompany the participant during the walk one of whom must be a fully competent Steadicam operator.
The responsibility for further Steadicam training will be at the discretion of the assessors.
Risk Assessment Form
Name:- Date of Assessment:-
Job Designation:-
Programme:-
Location:-

2 Public Liablitiy insurance
3 Employee liablity insurance

BACK
  • 0

#2 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 2922 posts
  • LA, Ca

Posted 23 May 2006 - 10:58 PM

I have no idea what you are trying to do with that. But I can tell you that if it were me authoring that I would edit it heavily to read as follows:

Use your brain and know when to say no.

That's it folks.

While that document that you posted may seem like a good idea to you I can tell you that there are many operators out there that will take great exception to being told what they need to do to be considered pros.

I know that I've been involved as a "Knight of the Green Screen" since 1980, I can take care of myself just fine thank you very much.
  • 0

#3 RobVanGelder

RobVanGelder

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 919 posts
  • Bangkok, Thailand

Posted 24 May 2006 - 03:40 AM

Wow, i could not even manage to read it fully!

But from what i saw, Eric is 100% right.

If you want to classify and protect and secure and de-stress and whatever more so much then i doubt if you would be able to pick up a Steadicam and make a shot at all!

Luckely the ISO9002/2001 or 2006 or whatever quality standard is not obligatory to be a Steadicam operator.

The One Thing we need when doing Steadicam is that we constantly have to push ahead, over the limits, invent new shots and solutions. We simply could not do that when we would apply all the rules that are mentioned here.

Flexibility, but with a common sense!

Bustercam- I think you mean well, but reread this piece of text again and then think if you really can work as is written down here, in every situation.

Best
:)

Oh, and don't even try to give this text or part of it to a producer or director... you can be certain they will not call you ever again!
  • 0

#4 Mike Marriage

Mike Marriage

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 90 posts

Posted 24 May 2006 - 06:40 AM

I think Buster is just pointing out the BBC rules in regards to Steadicam operating.

I am sure that the document has paid a bureaucrats wages for a few days if nothing else.

I agree with Rob and Eric - if the world had as much common sense as it does bureaucracy, we'd all get a lot more done. :)
  • 0

#5 Buster Arrieta

Buster Arrieta

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 63 posts
  • Bogotá D.C. - Colombia

Posted 24 May 2006 - 10:18 AM

Thanks! Mr. and Sir... all the forum, for your help, concept and opinion about this item.

There are tests of effort carried out in laboratory where the proportional rest is indicated to the effort, I thought or I believed that those BBC-Rules they were universal and of common global agreement of the union in benefit of the health of the steadicam operators.

Anyway I apologize them a thousand pardons or if in some moment I offended or I hurt some of my colleagues but it was not that my intention.

Apologize the confusion for terrible English that I dominate.

Pardon for my life, respected and dear colleagues.

Buster Arrieta
  • 0

#6 RobVanGelder

RobVanGelder

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 919 posts
  • Bangkok, Thailand

Posted 24 May 2006 - 11:14 PM

Don't worry Buster, you probably did not hurt anyone, just made us scratch on our head and wonder what this was all about.

But maybe next time you better explain a bit where you found the information, who made it, etc. That will avoid the confusion.
And include your own opinion of course!

Best and keep reading/posting
  • 0

#7 Iain Baird

Iain Baird

    Advanced Member

  • Sustaining Members
  • 269 posts
  • Toronto

Posted 25 May 2006 - 04:02 PM

I will have to add my WTF? to this post. It has being posted on a site read by the guys who are in the trenches. I'm especially surprised by the explaination that the confusion is due to a loss in translation, due to the size of the post, translation doesn't seem to be your week point. Anway I'm sure no lecturing was intended, although it was felt, I must say, but I had to respond due to my utter shock at the novel presented before me. Or perhaps only a novella but one (excuse the cliche) - "Lost in translation!!"



Iain (cheers from a showtime shoot in Ireland) Baird



p.s. It was nice to see the term "knights of the green screen again" as it seems to have been lost over the years, due I'm sure to the fact that the club isn't as exclusive as it once one. Although I can claim no knighthood myself since my membership only goes back to '97.
  • 0




Omnishot Systems

Engineered Cinema Solutions

PLC Electronics Solutions

SkyDreams

rebotnix Technologies

PLC - Bartech

Teradek

Paralinx LLC

Ritter Battery

Wireless Video Systems

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

BOXX

Boland Communications

Varizoom Follow Focus

GPI Pro Systems

IDX

Betz Tools for Stabilizers