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Working in a humid enviroment


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#1 PeterDalby

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Posted 15 May 2006 - 05:46 AM

Hi

I usually find anwers to all my questions just by reading this forum, but I can´t seem to find anything on working in a humid enviroment.

I am going to Panama to do a Steadicam shoot and coming from the dry(Though rainy...) and ,sometimes cold, Scandinavia, I was wondering if anybody could give me some good advice on how to keep rust away from my rig when working in the humidity they have in the tropics?

So if any of you have have been there are have some good advice how to keep my rig clean and shiny, I would love to hear from you.

A great summer to all of you

All the best

Peter Dalby
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#2 Bryan Fowler

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Posted 15 May 2006 - 07:03 AM

This one was hidden

It might get you started.

good luck!
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#3 Erwin Landau

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Posted 15 May 2006 - 12:49 PM

I remember very vividly a post by Larry McConkey about that topic. With mentioning by Mark O'Kane and Andrew Rowlands... could be in the archives or even as far back as the AOL folders...

Also a great article in the SOA newsletters "McConkey in Thailand" on his experience in the Jungle on the movie "Casualties Of War". (Vol. 1, Nr. 3 Dec. 88) Just looked it up there is actually also an article by Jimmy Muro and his experience in the Jamaican Jungle for "Mighty Quinn". Who would know... almost 20 years and still a good resource...

But anyhow...

I remember silica gel packs worked great in keeping the interior of your monitor dry. Also make sure you open the cases and make sure that there is a good air flow after you worked, again silica packs to suck up moisture, put them everywhere.
(Pelican Cases have a very nice one that can be backed in the oven to reinstate them and at that point $10 a piece, if you can reuse them, is a no brainer. Still get the baggy ones for the monitor, the Pelican ones are aluminum boxes.)

Also get silicon grease and oil moving parts and go to town with application on parts that could start to rust, even aluminum parts will get effected over time. Sweat is starting to penetrated the platting on my PRO arm, so dust covers would be a good idea no matter what style arm, but again at the end of the day take it off or see your rig turn orange over night.

Exchange all screws for stainless steel ones, if only for that particular job.

Also give yourself time to get used to the climate, drink a lot and stay out of the sun. Bring a heat and use a cold water dipped bandana. (Works wonders...) Also bring or buy tropical gear, I prefer long pans and high hiking boots just to keep the local fauna at bay. But that's me.

Good Luck,


Erwin"Stay Cool, Dry and Rust free" Landau
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#4 Gustavo Penna

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Posted 16 May 2006 - 01:27 AM

Ive worked in panama several times, and on one of those trips i stayed almost 20 days.
Regarding the Rusting issue: i did the same that i do in miami to keep my gear safe.
Regarding the humidity and the uncomfort of feeling misserable and soaking weet, theres nothing you can do. The wet Vandana helps though!
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#5 Edgar Colon

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Posted 18 May 2006 - 02:26 AM

Peter:

I live in Puerto Rico, Caribbean which means humidity all year long and can tell that besides a couple of little rusty screws because I'm pretty much a "WD 40" lazy guy you should'nt have much of a trouble with your rig. A nice dry towel will do it right

I rather give you personal tips. Be prepared to sweat like hell. Try underarmor lycra look alike shirts, long sleeves, they're not gonna make you feel any cooler but at least gonna help to keep you lees sweaty, you'll hate drops coming down from your arms crashing against your arm right away.
Eat right and drink a lot of water and you'll be rockin

Vandana and wide wrist bands is a must!!!!

Have fun and good luck

Edgar
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#6 PeterDalby

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Posted 24 May 2006 - 03:49 PM

Hi guys

Thank you so much for the replies. I have gone out and bought the Silica Gel packs and have brought some WD40 and some grease for my arm.

I look very forward to going to Panama. Coming from Scandinavia, it will be great to get some warm sunlight on my pale skin ;-)

Have a great summer, I know I will...

All the best

Peter
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#7 Buster Arrieta

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Posted 24 May 2006 - 09:06 PM

Thank you so much for the replies. I have gone out and bought the Silica Gel packs and have brought some WD40 and some grease for my arm.


NO... WD40... NO...

YES... ACF-50... YES... It is Better... Is Ideal
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#8 RobinThwaites

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Posted 25 May 2006 - 04:10 AM

Hi Guys

Please do not use WD-40, it is a penetrating oil with detergent in it and will wash out existing lubricants and loosen screws.

Robin Thwaites
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#9 thomas-english

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Posted 25 May 2006 - 07:54 AM

does this acf 50 react with grease and gunk up the same way wd40 would?
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#10 RobinThwaites

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Posted 26 May 2006 - 03:46 AM

While at OpTex I saw an arm which had been treated to a very heavy dose of ACF-50 and left. It does not seem to have the same detergent or penetrating properties as WD-40 and remain almost sticky to the touch.

The problem was that this had then attracted a lot of dirt and it needed to be stripped and cleaned with solvents before we could even tell what work was required. It probably prevented any corrosion but it is difficult to say if it washed out the bearings.

Robin Thwaites
Tiffen Europe
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#11 Simon Jayes

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Posted 26 May 2006 - 10:08 AM

I agree.........WD-40 BLOWS!

An alternate product that I have found works very well is Boeshield T-9. Check out http://www.boeshield.com/

I have used this extensively on Technocranes in nasty enviroments and found it to be far superior to WD-40.
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#12 robert_kunz

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Posted 27 May 2006 - 10:01 AM

I agree.........WD-40 BLOWS!

An alternate product that I have found works very well is Boeshield T-9. Check out http://www.boeshield.com/

I have used this extensively on Technocranes in nasty enviroments and found it to be far superior to WD-40.


here in good old europe we used to have good old "ballistol"weapon oil,don`t know if it´s available
all over the world but i`d guess so.excellent lubricating,no solvent or detergent and would not harm any kind of metal parts,plastics,rubber etc.and,first of all,perfect rust protection.just the smell of this stuff..... ;)
just keep your hands off wd-40!
best regards,rob
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