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Gimbal Lubrication


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#1 Brett Manyluk

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Posted 06 February 2006 - 10:17 PM

Hello all...

I decided to pull apart my sled and do a little cleaning. I currently have a modified EFP. When it comes to the gimbal, I went back through the archives and checked on recommendations for lubricants. I just wondered if there were any updates or suggestions. I am concerned about finding a readily available lubricant here in Canada, and one that is rated into extreme cold. By that I mean down to the -30, -40 celcius range. Of course it must also be great at +35 celcius for summer/interior use too.

Does anyone recommend lubricating the needle bearings in the yoke? Or is this unneccesary?

Any other general tuning advice for the old EFP gimbal is much apprecated.

Thanks,

Brett Manyluk
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#2 Brett Manyluk

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Posted 09 February 2006 - 09:18 PM

Anyone?

Bueller?
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#3 Brad Hruboska

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Posted 10 February 2006 - 12:04 AM

Brett I use that light Ari oil. Usually you can beg some off of a rental house...Use the finest oil you can or the bearing swill ( an I have found this out the hard way) will feel sticky and slow. I also used to use graphite spray lube on my arm cables to reduce wear friction there. Oh and a little grease on your gear rack for your stage helps hugely as well. Basically fast spinnign things use light oil, scrrews and gears use a light white grease...
Brad Hruboska

Anyone?

Bueller?


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#4 bobgilles

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Posted 10 February 2006 - 12:16 AM

Cleaning is the key with gimbals, I use no residue contact spray and inspect with jewelers eyeglasses, then apply one/two drops of Panavision machine oil. Panavision gives it to anyone renting the high speed Panastar and gives it to all AC's for free.
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#5 BRIANBUSBY

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Posted 10 February 2006 - 07:38 AM

try taking the bearings to a local watch/clock maker
and asking them to put them in their ultra sonic cleaner
then re oil them with a fine watch/clock oil

brian
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#6 Brant S. Fagan SOC

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Posted 10 February 2006 - 07:59 AM

Gents--

As I own several gimbals, have rebuilt dozens of gimbals, and have recently designed and manufactured my own unit, I have some recommendations.

1. Clean that gimbal often, perhaps once a month or more if working in dust and grit filled environments.

2. Keep a supply of your chosen lube with you at all times.

3. If you lube your own gimbal, try using less than one "standard" drop as over time whatever lube installed
will lead to the collection of material within your bearing(s).

4. Check all fastenings on your gimbal daily or weekly. This is critical with the fork fasteners.

5. Secure and pad your gimbal during shipments. Especially airborne trips!

By taking a few steps to care for your gimbal, your work will improve as the most important moving part of your system performs as it was designed.

Good luck.


Best,

Brant S. Fagan, SOC
Steadicam/Camera Operator
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#7 Brett Manyluk

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Posted 11 February 2006 - 01:45 PM

Thanks all, I very much appreciate it.

Brett
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