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Working on ice


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#1 Charles Papert

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Posted 24 January 2006 - 03:28 PM

Ah yes, this old chestnut--have an upcoming shoot on ice, I've been assured that it won't be high speed so I just need to be able to walk on an ice rink without wiping out. The conventional wisdom was golf or javelin shoes--I understand that current golf shoes have lost the metal spikes to plastic so they aren't as useful in this instance, does anyone have any recommendations for what's out there now?
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#2 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 24 January 2006 - 03:43 PM

I think you'll still be able to find golf shoes with with metal spikes if you look around a bit. I know that many professional golfers still wear them, so they are still made at least. I don't know how hard they would be to find. Also, I've seen shoe type things that fit on the bottom of your shoes at hockey games before. Not sure what they're called or what they're made of, or even how well they work, but it might be worth checking out. Spikes sure seem like they would work best though. Good luck.
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#3 Afton Grant

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Posted 24 January 2006 - 03:54 PM

There are these things called "Stabilicers", that secure to your sneakers. They contain metal cleats and are made for ice and other snow related conditions. Eastern Mountain Sports (do they have those on the West Coast?), and probably most other outdoor shops will sell them, or something like them. Should be less than $40.

OR

The old fashioned way would be to get some very small, short hex head screws and install them into the soles of your shoes.

Good luck and good walking,
Afton Grant
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#4 John Steele

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Posted 24 January 2006 - 04:10 PM

Hey Charles, I take it Ice skates are out of the question :-D.

John.
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#5 Kelsey W. Smith

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Posted 24 January 2006 - 05:36 PM

Hey Charles. What worked great for me was being hard mounted to a good old wheel chair. We chased a bunch of 10 yolds around the ring in LM for a commercial, it was great......... Ok. for me it was, but the grip was a tad bit tired at the end of it!! He had some sort of ice cleats over his boots, never slipped once.

Good luck!

Kelsey W.
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#6 Charles Papert

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Posted 24 January 2006 - 08:00 PM

Thanks guys...

Those "stabilicers" sound great, I'll check them out. We don't have EMS but there are similar stores like REI out here. Spent plenty of time at the EMS on Comm. Ave. back in the day!

Ice skates--even if I could ice skate, I wouldn't with a rig on! scary!

I've seen some groovy chair-on-blades type things for active shooting similar to a wheelchair, good for high speed--this is more delicate shooting, like rotating with actors who are essentially waltzing on the ice.

again, thanks for everyone's input!
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#7 Matt Burton

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Posted 24 January 2006 - 11:06 PM

This site seems to have it pretty well covered :P

cheers
-matt
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#8 jay kilroy

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Posted 25 January 2006 - 06:35 AM

Charles,

Not sure if you still need anything but here is a pretty good idea. Yak Traks Good luck.

jay
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#9 Simon Jayes

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Posted 25 January 2006 - 07:36 AM

Dear Charles,

These work great:
Posted Image

Check out http://cozywinters.c....html?source=go

Good Luck!
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#10 Charles Papert

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Posted 25 January 2006 - 08:57 AM

My research yesterday led me to these and more: from what I was told, the YakTrax were not heavy-duty enough for this application, the Stabilicers (as seen in Simon's pic, although there are several models with these being the middleweight) better but the best being a product called Icers, on which the Stabilicers were based.

http://www.joneakes....&icecleats.html

Turns out that the sales guy, Dave, at this store was a cameraman himself so I didn't have to describe more than "Steadicam on ice" for him to get the picture, and he said these were the ones to get.

I'll let you guys know how it turned out.
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#11 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 25 January 2006 - 04:31 PM

I guess all you have to worry about now is stepping on your own toes. Do'h!
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#12 Charles Papert

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 12:45 AM

or breaking my ankle--again...

no way!
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#13 PeterAbraham

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Posted 04 February 2006 - 06:27 PM

Well?? How'd it go, Charles? Did they ask you to run anyway, or was it a shoot as described?

Hope you kept on your toesies, and all went well.


Peter Abraham
New York
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#14 Charles Papert

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Posted 04 February 2006 - 08:55 PM

Oh, that's so--like--three jobs ago...!

No, really, everything went fine. The Icers worked fantastically, after some gingerly stepping around to assure myself that they were doing what they were supposed to do, I never had to think about them again that day.

It turns out that there are a few models of Stabilicer out there, and their top of the line product (the Deluxe) is a near-copy of the Canadian-made Icer, so it's probably the best choice for those looking to buy domestically (and I believe the removable cleats are interchangeable between the two anyway). The Stabilicer adds an additional strap from the toes up to the midfoot, which helps keep the front end attached to the boot but in practice I didn't feel the need for this and it might slow down application and removal.

So as it turned out, traction on the ice wasn't the big deal, I had more to contend with regarding the crane step-off, doing multiple rotations in place (dizzying!) and trying to find my orientation on a stage that had a 360 degree bluescreen.

This was incidentally the opening seequence for the new HBO series "Big Love".

When I get the chance I'll put up some pix.
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#15 PeterAbraham

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Posted 04 February 2006 - 11:34 PM

Cool ! I got lost years ago in a fog-filled cyc cylinder- no reference points, white fabric, white lights- but I had to find talent on the fly as they "appeared".

I had lighting rig a bare bulb up above the edge of the fabric, in line with the guy's entrance. It was out of frame, did not "pollute" the top of the shot with light, and I had a visual cue. Just one possible solution.......
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