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Steadicam Pilot Owner Needs Advice. (newbie)

Steadicam Pilot Steadicam Noob Advice

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#1 Marco Ramirez

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Posted 24 August 2016 - 11:38 AM

Hello fellow Steadicam users and OPs. Before going on let me introduce myself. I am 20 years old, I am not a film grad nor am I going to college for film; Although I do know a little bit about camera work and film already by experience. I've been working for a wedding production company for about 5 years and Using the Steadicam Pilot for 4 years. I wanna start getting more into the film area of work but I was wondering where I should start. Should I start by buying a bigger Steadicam? What is a good place to start looking for jobs? What kind of things should I be expecting with what I have. Should I focus more about my reel first?


Any tips or critiques are welcome and any contractors are too (I'll work for dirt cheap if needed, whatever gets me in)


Sincerely a passionate Pilot User.

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#2 Janice Arthur

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Posted 25 August 2016 - 05:36 PM


You're going to hate this but it's all you.

Join associations, work on Craigslist jobs; take a few college classes on production, read a lot of books on production, etc., etc,.

Figure out how to have a skill enough to be hired.

You right now are no different than any other wanna be, sorry but you've got to figure out to develop a skill of any type that someone will pay for. That means everything from production assistant on up the ladder.
What can you convince a production you know about moviemaking enough to get hired.

Buy another rig or not up to you.

Good luck.

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#3 Janice Arthur

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Posted 26 August 2016 - 09:22 AM


Not to make you completely crazy but an additional comment is this; any career or job you attempt involves some or all of the above.

Plumber, lawyer, bricklayer all require you achieve some level of knowledge or skill before you can attempt to work.

How much skill and how long it takes to get it and how much it costs to get the skill(s) is what an employer is paying for.

So back to the original thought if you're discouraged here because of the work involved then we, those in the business, know some big percentage of those who try will quit. That's just numbers, the bad news for you, if you quit because it's too hard then guess what you've got to do the trying in some other field and the trying/working hard part is the same. You're back to the same point.

Good luck.

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