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Geo vs. Steadyrig


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#1 Dan Coplan

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Posted 05 December 2005 - 01:58 AM

I've heard great things about both the Steadyrig and G50/70 arms. Not sure what pricing on the G70 is, but pricing between the Steadyrig and G50 is very comparable. Steadyrig holds up to 63(?) lbs. and the G50 holds up to 50. Steadyrig seems like a very solid arm but based on older technology whereas the G50 sounds like also very solid based on newer technology.

I'm about to plunk down a chunk of change for my first arm. I am absolutely going to try the G50 (short drive to Tiffen) and will try the Steadyrig if I can find one locally, but being a newbie, I don't have the best point of reference for comparison.

I was originally sold on the Steadyrig because it's newer than used IIIA arms but a helluva lot cheaper than Pro arms and has gotten great reviews - seemed like the perfect compromise. Then I started reading about the G arms and now I'm not so sure. I am a little concerned about the 50 lb. limit on the G50. I have no idea what I'll be flying as I set forth in this relatively new arena for me, but I'm aiming for the top and don't want to be left out of jobs based on the limitations of my gear.

Rumor has it that the G70 is going to be around $18K? That would put it out of range for me.

Dan "Large sums of money are about to flow steadily out of my wallet" Coplan
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#2 Nils Ruinet

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Posted 05 December 2005 - 06:00 AM

Hi Dan,

If you decide that 50 lbs in enough for you, then there's no hesitation, go for the G50. It's an excellent arm, way better than a 3A type arm.

If not, the steadyrig arm seems to be an excellent choice. The price is similar, and the support is great.
Or you can decide to wait for the G70 arm, which will be one of the best arms ever made, but will probably cost like twice the price (well probably between 15 an 20 K$).

I was in the same situation, and decided to go for a steadyrig arm (I should order one soon). And then in a few years, I'll probably upgrade to a G70, when I've got the money and when it has been field tested extensively...

Regards,
Nils.
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#3 Dan Coplan

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Posted 05 December 2005 - 12:08 PM

How limiting is a 50lb. limit? I want to be available to work on any project that comes my way, but I've also been told that limiting myself to only flying 50lbs. might be a good thing - saving myself from early retirement.

On average, if this can be loosely defined, what do rigs weigh on "professional" features and episodic TV?

Dan Coplan
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#4 Imran Naqvi

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Posted 05 December 2005 - 12:18 PM

How limiting is a 50lb. limit?


Easiest answer to this is, how heavy will your sled without camera package be? That'll tell you roughly what your arm will be able to work with.
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#5 Anders Holck Petersen

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Posted 09 December 2005 - 08:20 PM

My sled weights 18.3 lbs with LCD monitor, one 160wh LI-ion batt, focus receiver, servo and transmitter.
In practical tests I found the G50 arm to provide adequate lift up to 52 lbs.
That leaves room for a 33.7 lbs camera on the G50 arm.
Note that if you strip the sled to carry a heavy camera you'll have to raise the gimbal very close to the stage and maybe operate with an ankward long post,

I recently had a HD shoot with the following:
Sony HVW-750p
Pro 35 adapter
Zeiss prime lens
Arri bridgeplate w. rods and mattebox.
Total camera weight was around 30 lb.

When doing film, you'll cross the limit easily with older cameras especially as you'll, need an extra battery or an DC-DC converter to power the ~30v. Newer lighter cameras with the ability to stripped with a video top and steadimags will fit more easily.
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#6 Mikael Kern

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Posted 17 January 2006 - 07:48 AM

I am a little concerned about the 50 lb. limit on the G50. I have no idea what I'll be flying as I set forth in this relatively new arena for me, but I'm aiming for the top and don't want to be left out of jobs based on the limitations of my gear.

Rumor has it that the G70 is going to be around $18K? That would put it out of range for me.

Dan "Large sums of money are about to flow steadily out of my wallet" Coplan


Since you don´t know what you´ll be flying, go for the G50. That gives you value for your money (and the newest technology).

It´s allways easy to upgrade if you should need it. When the call comes for a heavy camera just rent or borrow. You might find an operator with a´bigger´arm that is willing to swap arms for some days/weeks. Get to know operators that live in your area so that you know where to get help when you need it. This applies to other things too: cables, brackets etc.

Mikael Kern
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