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Docking stand state of the art?


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#1 JohnPinella

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Posted 01 December 2005 - 04:00 PM

I've been happy enough using a C-stand for my Master Elite, but you can't really ship it, and this week that meant a drive from the airport to a rental house just to rent one C-stand. And one sand bag.
Very embarrassing! The upside: They didn't charge me.

So, what are people using: I remember the American Beefy baby being popular... I carry everything up to Moviecams and 535Bs and HD cameras, so it has to be, uh, beefy

-John Pinella
Indianapolis
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#2 Kenn Ferro SOC

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Posted 01 December 2005 - 08:11 PM

I've been happy enough using a C-stand for my Master Elite, but you can't really ship it, and this week that meant a drive from the airport to a rental house just to rent one C-stand. And one sand bag.
Very embarrassing! The upside: They didn't charge me.

So, what are people using: I remember the American Beefy baby being popular... I carry everything up to Moviecams and 535Bs and HD cameras, so it has to be, uh, beefy

-John Pinella
Indianapolis

As I recall back when we did the Rockport workshops for CP. We had these cute little break apart steel C stands from matthews that fit nicely into the vest bag. Prolly not the beefest solution, but sure is better than nothing.
Kenn
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#3 JohnPinella

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Posted 01 December 2005 - 08:26 PM

I've been happy enough using a C-stand for my Master Elite, but you can't really ship it, and this week that meant a drive from the airport to a rental house just to rent one C-stand. And one sand bag.
Very embarrassing! The upside: They didn't charge me.

So, what are people using: I remember the American Beefy baby being popular... I carry everything up to Moviecams and 535Bs and HD cameras, so it has to be, uh, beefy

-John Pinella
Indianapolis

As I recall back when we did the Rockport workshops for CP. We had these cute little break apart steel C stands from matthews that fit nicely into the vest bag. Prolly not the beefest solution, but sure is better than nothing.
Kenn


Yeah, I've got one of those, it bends like a palm tree in a hurricane; makes me nervous
-John Pinella
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#4 Charles Papert

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Posted 01 December 2005 - 11:36 PM

I've used the American stand for years and like it. The black powdercoating does rust off after a while, but the stand is cheap enough that it's more cost effective to just buy another (and if you can make it to LA, American will sell it to you for 40% off direct).

I couldn't imagine using a stand without wheels (such as a C-stand) at this point. Having to lift the whole kit and kaboodle just to shift the thing a few feet is a nightmare, let alone having to finagle a sandbag as part of the deal.

Erwin has been busily designing a succession of beautiful carts with Backstage that allow for mounting of the rig. Worth checking them out also.
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#5 RobVanGelder

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Posted 02 December 2005 - 02:11 AM

I use an Avenger A120 stand, it´s a a heavy stand for big lamps but cannot be raised high, though it has 2 extendable sections. Normally this stand has a small footprint, similar as a C-stand, but the whole construction is much heavier, allowing lamps of 60+ kilos. I drilled on each leg an extra hole, allowing it to spread much wider and still be strong enough for any rig with camera, without bending,

The good thing of this stand that it can be disassembled in 3 parts with a Hex key, making it another 20-30 cm shorter. Just need a proper case/bag for it.
It´s heavy, so it adds on the transport bill/overweight but then I would not allow a rig + camera ($100.000 - 300-000) on a wobbly C-stand.
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#6 JensSchroder

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Posted 02 December 2005 - 02:59 AM

I've used the American stand for years and like it. The black powdercoating does rust off after a while, but the stand is cheap enough that it's more cost effective to just buy another (and if you can make it to LA, American will sell it to you for 40% off direct).

I couldn't imagine using a stand without wheels (such as a C-stand) at this point. Having to lift the whole kit and kaboodle just to shift the thing a few feet is a nightmare, let alone having to finagle a sandbag as part of the deal.

Erwin has been busily designing a succession of beautiful carts with Backstage that allow for mounting of the rig. Worth checking them out also.


Hi Charles,

I would be highly interested in buying one of those American stands. And I'll probably make it to L.A. this december too. Would you have the address of the company and would they sell wheels too?

Thanks and greetings from Germany,

Jens
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#7 IanMcMillan

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Posted 02 December 2005 - 10:11 AM

Hi all,
And hello Robbie, hows Tailand? Living films, what a story! Years ago while on a fast series my focus puller turned up on a monday and said " I've made you this and you WILL use it." For a mark 1 PRO he took a handtruck, welded a plate on the base and another plate 8 inches above that. An old section of a real Century stand was welded into the middle of the frame. The front from top to bottom is lined with light ply wood, covered with rubber and foam. Two hooks on the back of the trolley, one with a 6 inch diameter PVC pipe underneath it.
So thats the discription, now picture this. On the bottom plate sits a foam lined, lo profile tubby for the batteries. at least 4 or 5 at any time so no need for a shot bag. On the second plate is my dilly bag with tools, cigs, sweets palm pilot, call sheet and anything else for the day. The docking bracket sits on the c stand top and can be raised or lowered depending on the length of the rig. Obviously with PRO #28 that was nothing like the stretch we can get with an Ultra etc. On the hooks go the Vest and the arm sits safely in the pipe hanging from the other. It worked beautifully with that pro and the concept works for all rigs. The great thing is it could easily go as oversized baggage and fit in a rental car. I still have it and have used it for years.
I guess its the compromise between having it all on one trolley or being able to move the essentials quickly and safely.

All the best

Macca
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#8 Charles Papert

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Posted 02 December 2005 - 12:33 PM

I would be highly interested in buying one of those American stands. And I'll probably make it to L.A. this december too. Would you have the address of the company and would they sell wheels too?


Hi Jens:

Here is the page from their
online catalog:. The contact tab should give you all that you need to find them, and make sure to check the prices with them as they have offered 40% off when you buy direct in the past. They do sell wheel kits also. Backstage was showing a great wheel conversion for the American stand that uses large pneumatic tires.
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#9 JohnPinella

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Posted 04 December 2005 - 09:49 PM

Do you guys use the one riser or two riser stand? And, do you extend the risers?
thanks for all info!
-John Pinella
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#10 Charles Papert

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Posted 04 December 2005 - 10:01 PM

John,

As for me, I prefer the single riser as it weighs less, and usually use it with the riser fully extended (lowering it for low mode). However I am somewhat "undertall" so I assume that those nearer the 6' mark prefer the two riser. It is perfectly stable with the riser extended, no problem spin balancing (of course you need to make sure you have the dock aligned over a leg).
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#11 Lawrence Karman

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Posted 04 December 2005 - 11:18 PM

John,

As for me, I prefer the single riser as it weighs less, and usually use it with the riser fully extended (lowering it for low mode). However I am somewhat "undertall" so I assume that those nearer the 6' mark prefer the two riser. It is perfectly stable with the riser extended, no problem spin balancing (of course you need to make sure you have the dock aligned over a leg).



I have one of these stands with the extra riser. I was glad I had it a few weeks ago when on a commercial I was asked to set up in low mode for the first shot. Turned out we had to wait for something so they asked me to shoot some head shot type interviews while we waited. I hung the rig on the docking bracket pin with both risers nearly extended and operated off a ladder. Silly of course, but a good use of the extra riser. I say get it.
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