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complete newb requesting help with pilot hd system


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#1 MarcusC

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 02:21 PM

complete steadicam rookie newb.  Long story short, the company president wants to produce an internal video.  He wants some steadicam shots in the video, he tells us to purchase a steadicam system.  this was last friday, 3/25/16  we purchase the pilot hd system.  Using the included quick start guide, and youtube videos, we are able to achieve static balance with our JVC GY-HM600.  However, dynamic balance and proper tension on the arms is kicking our tails.  what advice/tips/tricks/etc does anyone have for us?  


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#2 Janice Arthur

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 02:52 PM

Marcus;

 

Welcome to Steadicam.  You've got it statically balanced, great.  Forget dynamic, really not necessary right now and you need to just get working on the other stuff like how to shoot.

 

Get the vest fit and the arm on the vest.  Pick up the rig.  The arm should be pretty much flat with the rig on the arm.

 

Hold the rig with your left hand and with your right hand raise or lower each section with the blue knob at the end of each arm section until they're both about flat.  Simple screwing and unscrewing does it.

 

Simple stuff.  Refer to the documentation you have for walking and shooting dos and don'ts and see what you figure out.

 

Sometimes its made to seem harder than it is or your expectations are different than what you are experiencing.

 

I think you've gotten the rig on the arm and its so wildly loose on all the parts, the arm moves, the sled is freely moving it has you scared and you're not sure what to do; let alone how to calm it all down to make shots. 

 

If you're there hold onto the sled with your left hand right by the gimbal, get the arm in the right way as described, then hold onto the part where the arm (right hand) meets the sled (yoke) and MAKE IT all stay still as you walk.

 

Where are you located?

 

A local op may be able to help you short cut some of the stuff you're not getting.

 

Good luck.

 

Janice


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#3 MarcusC

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 03:28 PM

Marcus;

 

Welcome to Steadicam.  You've got it statically balanced, great.  Forget dynamic, really not necessary right now and you need to just get working on the other stuff like how to shoot.

 

Get the vest fit and the arm on the vest.  Pick up the rig.  The arm should be pretty much flat with the rig on the arm.

 

Hold the rig with your left hand and with your right hand raise or lower each section with the blue knob at the end of each arm section until they're both about flat.  Simple screwing and unscrewing does it.

 

Simple stuff.  Refer to the documentation you have for walking and shooting dos and don'ts and see what you figure out.

 

Sometimes its made to seem harder than it is or your expectations are different than what you are experiencing.

 

I think you've gotten the rig on the arm and its so wildly loose on all the parts, the arm moves, the sled is freely moving it has you scared and you're not sure what to do; let alone how to calm it all down to make shots. 

 

If you're there hold onto the sled with your left hand right by the gimbal, get the arm in the right way as described, then hold onto the part where the arm (right hand) meets the sled (yoke) and MAKE IT all stay still as you walk.

 

Where are you located?

 

A local op may be able to help you short cut some of the stuff you're not getting.

 

Good luck.

 

Janice

thanks for the reply and info.  I'm located in Jonesboro, Arkansas.  I'm to the point where I am fine tuning the arm because it either wants to slide violently away from me or violently to me.  it seems that the slightest adjustment either on the T screws or on the blue knob on the arms has a drastic change.


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#4 Janice Arthur

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 04:05 PM

Marcus

Here is where a workshop or a local can shortcut your problems but you are stuck with us.

1) arm flat sections. Don't mess with them once they're flat.

2) t wrench on the gimbal once you have it statically balanced on tv spud don't change that.

3) swinging toward or away from you has the most to do with your posture

Once you put on the arm dial in the top screw on the socket block til you see 3-4 threads then tighten the bottom thumbscrew against it
Now pick up the rig. Left hand on the rig under the gimbal, right hand on the yoke at the end of the arm.

IMPORTANT part. Stand so that the arm doesn't move strongly either way as you described it.

You're posture is key, lean back from waist, belly button up toward ceiling (don't break at the hips)
It's all in your posture.

Try that much.

If you had someone who knew standing there it's a 1/2 hr fix. You're close.

Janice
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#5 Victor Lazaro

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 04:36 PM

Wow Janice, great explanations. I was also thinking, make sure your vest is properly fastened to you. It should be tight (without stopping you from breathing) and the socket block should not move too much from your body if grabbed and pulled around. Make sure your vest looks centered on your body. If all fails, have someone make a small video of your issue we might be able to troubleshoot it from here.
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