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Victoria


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#1 Akiko Baldridge

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Posted 30 August 2015 - 08:16 AM

Two weeks ago, I saw the film Victoria (2015) in the cinemas here in Germany. It is an amazing one-shot, 140 minutes long, with the most gorgeously framed scenes. The DOP is camera operator Sturla Brandth Grøvlen from Norway. I watched some really fantastic interviews with the director and the main actress about how they rehearsed for several months in preparation, but have not stumbled across any interviews detailing the equipment used. The only information Grøvlen leaked is that his camera weighed 6 kg (just over 13 pounds). To be honest, I'm not sure if a Steadicam was used or not. The shots were not as smooth as a crane or a dolly, but they were definitely not as jumpy as they are when I film while walking without the use of a Steadicam. 


Edited by Akiko Baldridge, 30 August 2015 - 08:17 AM.

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#2 Louis Puli SOC

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Posted 30 August 2015 - 05:37 PM

Hi Akiko 

Welcome to the forum 

With regards to "Victoria"it was shot handheld with a Canon C300.

Good luck 

Louis 


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#3 Akiko Baldridge

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Posted 31 August 2015 - 02:22 AM

Hi Louis.

 

Thanks for the info and thanks for the welcome! 

 

I did notice during the chase scene the shot was a bit jerky, but I also remember the opening scene in the disco being very smooth in my memory and that's why I wasn't sure if some sort of steadicam was used or not. I think the term I keep hearing for this super smooth movement is "flying"? For Victoria, during the chase scene, being able to see the operator's frantic steps in the camera's movement added to my own nervousness and I think it helped add to the suspense of the scene.

 

Has there already been a discussion about when handheld would be more appropriate for a scene and when flying would be more appropriate the mood of a scene? For example, I know for me, I like seeing a Steadicam used in happy, romantic scenarios like when a freshly in-love couple are running through a meadow at sunset. The flying gives me the feeling as if I too am floating on cloud nine with the couple.


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#4 Mariano Costa

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Posted 10 September 2015 - 04:29 PM

Victoria was the first and probably last German movie I watched for a long time. The logistics were insane (kudos!) and a few bits were nicely done acting wise (for example in the cafe when the girl played piano) but the rest: meh...story was mostly awful and the camera work: not my taste... I think it was an interesting experiment but proved once again how essential good editing is.
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#5 Louis Puli SOC

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Posted 10 September 2015 - 05:21 PM

There is another one shot film called Fish & Cat (Iranian )I haven't seen it yet but I have ordered the DVD .


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