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Steadicam Stand


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#1 Dennis Dwyer

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Posted 03 July 2015 - 05:05 PM

I currently own an American stand with the 8" Wheel Set and to be honest I'm not happy at all with the purchase.  The stand, without wheels, has to small of a base to attempt dynamically balancing on and it's almost a requirement to buy their wheels to achieve the wider base.  With the stand and wheels together it weighs a ton and if the terrain does not permit to wheel around the stand.  The stand is a hassle to move around itself.  

 

Basically I'm wondering if their's something similar out there that's lighter weight (Aluminum) and has a larger base where it doesn't require the stand to have wheels.  Any suggestions? 


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#2 Jess Haas SOC

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Posted 03 July 2015 - 06:10 PM

American makes a wider base version. They might be able to modify your current stand. Do you have the single or double riser? I find the single riser without wheels to not be too heavy. Just barely tall enough to be functional without wheels on though.
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#3 RonBaldwin

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Posted 03 July 2015 - 06:13 PM

The wider base is the way to go. You can still adjust the legs to use the wheels. I hate using wheels, beats up the rig...and most door jams
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#4 Dennis Dwyer

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Posted 03 July 2015 - 06:20 PM

I have the single riser and w/o wheels and it's definitely not that heavy, but i'm trying to go aluminum.  Also, with the single riser I feel it's just a little to short for me.  

 

I agree with the wheels.  It beats the rig up and there's just places they're not needed at.  Plus they out price the stand itself! (For the 8" wheels)

 

Still on the hunt for something Aluminum though.


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#5 Robert Starling SOC

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Posted 03 July 2015 - 06:50 PM

Agreed it's a wonky sort of stand set up but it's what I've been using a long time.

 

At one point Inovative had looked at making some very lightweight 8" wheels but I'm not sure where that went.

 

Earlier this week I stopped in at Matthews looking for a stand more suitable for my Ronin setup.  They have a "Runway base" that has low flat legs with smaller wheels.  Two of the legs are longer and one is shorter so you can roll it through a door without the wig-wag pattern.  I'm not sure how much of a PIA is would be too but it's an option I suppose.

 

Robert


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#6 Ants Martin Vahur

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Posted 04 July 2015 - 09:06 AM

Hi!

 

I used American stand with 4'' wheels for 7 years. I was really happy with it, the weight was perfect, I almost never used any sandbags on the stand, for balancing I just asked someone to hold their foot on the opposite leg of a stand. The downsides were, that the riser lock on the stand got old and didn't hold very well anymore. And the hard wheels work only for smooth concrete.

 

Few weeks ago I purchased a new American stand with 6'' pneumatic wheels. The wheels are great for outdoors. The quality is not very good though and I'm afraid that the breaks won't last more than year or two. Otherwise I'm really happy with it. It has very good wide base and weight. For narrow indoors I can remove the wheels and have smaller base.

 

I've seen some operators using C-stands, but I'm a bit afraid that they are not very safe, especially outdoors. I always feel that they're gonna fall over.

 

My humble opinion

Ants Martin


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#7 Jess Haas SOC

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Posted 04 July 2015 - 01:32 PM

For me the key is to have multiple stands. The weight of the pneumatic tire stand is what makes it so solid so in situations where it is suitable it is great. I also carry a single riser without wheels for situations where the heavy stand is a liability.I can also dock on my cart.
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#8 Brian Freesh

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Posted 13 July 2015 - 07:50 PM

I have the 2-riser American Stand with 8" pneumatic and I love it.  Not sure I want to know what Ron's doing with it that it beats up the rig. The wheels come off easily when the terrain calls for it and it's plenty stable to set the rig on with the rig over a leg (keep an eye on the ACs as they often ignore this concept), but I'll often get a shot bag just in case. I do find that ACs have trouble accepting that removing the wheels is easy and/or worth the "effort" but once I talk them into it they gladly carry around a sand bag rather than the wheels.

 

And even though i've seen two operators switch from this to an American stand, I have often thought about getting one of these: http://www.bhphotovi...Baby_Stand.html

 

These come in different models and from different manufacturers, not sure if the linked one is best or not, but I belive it is the one I've used (may have used triple riser).  But I've used these before to great success.  Even the steel ones are light enough to carry in one hand while wearing the rig, but they do come in aluminum. The stance is wide enough that everything is very stable, at least on the steel version.  Aluminum might be a bit too unstable.


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#9 RonBaldwin

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Posted 14 July 2015 - 09:35 AM

I find it better to make it assistant-proof because a full time op rarely has the time to get it himself let alone supervise the handling. Day playing might be a different story. The rig does take a beating when hung on a stand with no lower pad/cushion supporting it. And since many sleds dock via the screw that holds it all together (while bouncing over cobblestone streets, beat sidewalks, homeless gentlemen, and squeezing through tiny doorways and elevators) I thought I would minimize this vibration and beating after seeing some gross attempts at pushing the rig over insane terrain. Traveling on the cart or being carried reduces the chances of trouble. But...having wheels is nice for some locations. I have them but rarely use them.
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#10 Victor Lazaro

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Posted 14 July 2015 - 12:38 PM

I have this stand and I'm fairly happy with it. 

http://www.bhphotovi...ight_Stand.html

It has a nice wide base with casters at the very end (it's a bit awkward when folded) and the low base really allow a lot of clearance for the sled. it does have a bit of flex with really heavy setups but it is working great for me so far. 

I try to avoid rolling the sled for long distances, I would carry the rig or put it on my cart, but the casters are useful when you need to move it out of the way quickly.Avenger_A5029_A420_Wheeled_Light_Stand_1


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#11 Brian Freesh

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Posted 14 July 2015 - 12:44 PM

So... working in New York is what you're doing to the rig.... ;)

 

Yeah I travel the rig on the cart more often than not, the stand is for getting it closer to set and only ever makes small moves, which is why a heavy stand with wheels or a light stand with no wheels seems to work very nicely.


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#12 RonBaldwin

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Posted 14 July 2015 - 01:05 PM

NY is definitely tough on all gear...but the cobblestone incident was courtesy of a clueless assistant at Greystone Mansion in LA. If it was with a newer pro docked via the post locking collar me thinks serious damage might have been caused. I feel far more comfy knowing the rig is safe and stupid-proof on a nice cushy cart
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#13 Alex Kornreich

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Posted 16 July 2015 - 04:20 PM

Ron, my rig broke 2 days ago from that exact reason! Docking ring on the collar that connects DBIII to post, threads wore down, rig fell apart. I now believe due to the vibrations caused while rolling rig over rough terrain. Thankfully no camera (or human) harm done, but now out of commission for at least a week. 

 

I put the Hill docking ring on the collar about 4 months ago, so it was 4 months of wear and tear before the threads finally gave out.

 

Lesson learned: Either do not attached docking ring to the collar that holds everything together (i.e. attach docking ring directly to post), OR exercise extreme caution when transporting rig while attached to dock. Roll on super smooth surface, or carry rig by hand for all else.

 

When the rig is resting on the cart, do you have anything to support the bottom, or still just docking ring on the upper post?


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#14 RonBaldwin

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Posted 16 July 2015 - 08:08 PM

Sorry to hear about your sled. That is exactly what I am afraid of. Even when one is careful there is a good deal of vibration getting to the rig. I always lower the sled onto a pad to move it. If it's gonna be a bumpy ride I just pop the camera off (or carry the sled) so there isn't 30 lbs of torque beating the poop outta the threads.

The little platform I made can attach to the stand when I use it+wheels so there is a smoother ride there also.

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#15 James Davis

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Posted 17 July 2015 - 07:39 PM

Hey guys, You should email optical support and check out their awesome lock/dock ring that replaces both the lock ring up top and jerry hill docking ring. I've seen it in person and it is a fantastically well made and robust piece of kit, pricey, but I think on my list of future upgrades for sure.


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