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Which IDX batteries to choose?


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#1 Christopher Kechichian

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 05:26 PM

Hey everyone,

 

I'm looking to buy some new batteries that I can use to power up power hungry cameras like the Alexa and others but I also need them to be light. I'll be using them in parallel or series depending on the camera. I know that the IDX E7s high load are pretty much the standard but what do you guys recommend? I'm sure there are new light and high load batteries.

Thanks a lot.


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#2 Zachary Shannon

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 06:36 PM

Hi Christopher,

 

For high load camera setups in which weight will be a priority, we would recommend using either the E-HL9 (www.idxtek.com/products/E-HL9) or E-HL9S (www.idxtek.com/products/E-HL9S) batteries. The E-HL9 & E-HL9S batteries are both 87wh batteries which will be able to handle 10A/120W loads while weighing in at only ~1.6lbs(each). These models are available and shipping now.

Another option we would recommend is using our upcoming E-HL10DS(www.idxtek.com/products/e-hl10ds) battery. The E-HL10DS will be an economical 95Wh high load battery with an onboard 50W D-tap(to power accessories) & will weigh approx. 1.76lbs(a little larger than the E-HL9/E-HL9S). The E-HL10DS will be available/ready for shipping by next month.

 

Please also note that the E-7S battery can only handle up to a 4.6A/50W without experiencing cell damage. Therefore, to prolong the life of the E-7S battery, we would not recommend using it battery to power high load cameras like the Alexa if possible. Please let me know if you have any other questions or concerns.

 

- George


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#3 Sanjay Sami

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Posted 13 January 2015 - 02:20 AM

Hi Zack,

Do you have a distributer in India ? I could not find one on your website.

 

Regards

 

Sanjay Sami


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#4 Christopher Kechichian

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Posted 13 January 2015 - 12:05 PM

Hi Zack,

 

Thank your for the info, much appreciated. Let's say we have a camera that draws approximately 100W (Alexa with Aks), and I'm powering it through 2x E-HL10DS in series (24V instead of 12V) wouldn't the power draw be higher than what the battery can handle (100W vs 95Wh)? As I know, when two batteries are in series, the voltage doubles but the capacity stays the same, whereas in parallel it's vice versa. Thanks.


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#5 Tom Wills

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Posted 13 January 2015 - 12:43 PM

Wh is Watt Hours, a measurement of how long the battery will last - a 95 watt hour battery will power a 95 watt load for an hour. This is separate from the amperage capacity - which on both batteries should be the same, 10A, or 120W. There are many a wonderful battery with huge capacities that can only support 50w loads, and there are batteries like the HL9s that only have 87w of capacity, but can handle 120w loads.
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#6 Zachary Shannon

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Posted 13 January 2015 - 01:23 PM

Hi Zack,

Do you have a distributer in India ? I could not find one on your website.

 

Regards

 

Sanjay Sami

 

Hi Sanjay,

Please see contact info. below:

 

Visual Technologies India PVT Ltd

370 371/2 Hospital Road, Jangpura
New Delhi, 110014
India

Tel: +91 11 2431 9961
Fax: +91 11 2432 9961
Email: nidhi@vtipl.com
Website: www.vtipl.com


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#7 Zachary Shannon

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Posted 13 January 2015 - 01:38 PM

Hi Zack,

 

Thank your for the info, much appreciated. Let's say we have a camera that draws approximately 100W (Alexa with Aks), and I'm powering it through 2x E-HL10DS in series (24V instead of 12V) wouldn't the power draw be higher than what the battery can handle (100W vs 95Wh)? As I know, when two batteries are in series, the voltage doubles but the capacity stays the same, whereas in parallel it's vice versa. Thanks.

 

The cells inside the E-HL10DS are designed for high loads(10A/120W loads). As Tom Willis mentioned some batteries can and cannot handle high loads because of the battery cell chemistry ratios. For example, the IDX CUE-D95(www.idxtek.com/products/cue-d95) has a 91Wh capacity, but can only handle up to a 6.3A/76W load. This is because the cells used in this battery are not designed for high loads.


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#8 Christopher Kechichian

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Posted 14 January 2015 - 07:07 AM

Thanks Zach and Tom for the info. Much appreciated.


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#9 Zachary Shannon

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Posted 14 January 2015 - 11:46 AM

Thanks Zach and Tom for the info. Much appreciated.

 

NP Christopher, anytime!


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#10 Sanjay Sami

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Posted 21 January 2015 - 06:33 AM

Thank you Zack
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#11 Zachary Shannon

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Posted 21 January 2015 - 11:46 AM

Thank you Zack

My pleasure Sanjay!


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