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Maximum Inertia - are you a fan?


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#1 Emilio Schlappi

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Posted 23 September 2014 - 05:29 AM

Hi chaps, 

 

I find myself operating with a long sled more and more these days, as the increased inertia seems to do wonders for my operating - am I in the minority here? Do most prefer the feel of a 'lively' short sled? Would be fascinated to hear some opinions here.

 

Would also love to hear from operators who use Antlers - do they give you a similar inertial feel in the pan axis as my long sled gives me in the tilt axis? And, as a side note, why do I never see them mounted parallel to the camera, or on the bottom of the sled?

 

Apologies for the varied questions, and thanks as always for your thoughts..

 

E


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#2 RonBaldwin

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Posted 23 September 2014 - 08:12 AM

Everyone is different, but In my life in episodic I am more often (always) expected to be as close to dolly as I can be so I like a long sled as well. No antlers, just long sled, heavy drop time, with the occasional gyro in the swirly wind in Manhattan. I was never fond of a short sled...I like the stability and ease of seeing the monitor. Sleds with the monitor dropped (coplanar) feel great as well...though it's a pain to see the monitor for me so I don't do that.

I would probably choke if I do a music video...don't watch them and out of practice with whippy sleds
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#3 richard bellon

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Posted 23 September 2014 - 08:51 AM

How long is long... Just curious as to actual inch length... As in bottom of sled to top off stage. In case you were wondering... No puns intended here
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#4 Jerry Holway

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Posted 23 September 2014 - 09:11 AM

Antlers will add inertia in all axes (pan tilt and roll). And they help with inertial inequality with long sleds. If oriented fore and aft, they are very useful for strong accelerations in that axis. If oriented side to side, they help even out the difference in inertia between tilt and roll.

 

They are typically mounted on the bottom of sleds for low-mode.


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#5 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

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Posted 23 September 2014 - 10:53 AM

Just make sure that when using antlers you don't hit the actor with them....

Disclaimer, I don't use antlers and never have, I just know of a few instances of it happening and the operator being sacked
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#6 RonBaldwin

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Posted 25 September 2014 - 10:42 AM

In case there was a misunderstanding...I was talking about the length of the sled front to back (rereading my post it sounds like it could be mistaken for post length). I actually just measured my sled

:pro2 with pro monitor bracket (with 4" ext) and nebtek/batt is 26 inches front to back. Take off 2 inches when I use the tb6. The post I keep compressed and only really ever extend it for low mode...the sled measures 28.5 inches from bottom of fracol "foot" pro plate to top of camera dovetail. The "foot" adds about. 5 lb and about 3/4" to the overall length

Used antlers once or twice...not a huge fan but I admit I have little experience with them. Would rather stretch the rig out for inertia. Obviously impossible widthwise...but I guess that's where the hand on the gimbal earns it's keep.
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#7 Jerry Holway

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Posted 25 September 2014 - 11:45 AM

Antlers are just another tool we can use or not as we choose, and like any other, there are compromises - in this case of weight and space.

 

The nice thing about them is that they are simple, quiet, quick, and versatile, with a lot inertia added for a small weight wind shadow penalty.  Using them also just feels like a bigger Steadicam, so there is no learning curve while operating (compared to gyros, for instance). And they are inexpensive (commercial version). The concept is so simple that homemade or on the spot versions can be made easily - all that's required is a stiff rod, a couple of lead or steel (or similar dense material) weights and some sort of clamp to the camera top or to the sled bottom in low mode.

 

Of course, if you can get enough inertia for a particular situation by extending the post, monitor, and/or batteries, there is no need to add Antlers or gyros.


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#8 RonBaldwin

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Posted 25 September 2014 - 01:33 PM

I will have to give them another try...bad experience when I 1st tried them. I use gyros a bit more than I thought here in Manhattan. The swirly wind is pretty unpredictable and there is only so much nets can do. Quite often for singles on walk and talks I have to use 90+ mm which would be a real shit show without nets and gyros...I used to think that combo was a bit like suspenders AND a belt but have to use bother at least once a week it seems. Hate those little bastards but they do save my arise (and hose me almost as much)
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#9 Richard James Lewis

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Posted 25 September 2014 - 03:42 PM

I mix gyros and antlers for vehicle work now, seems to make for good results.


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