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Tips on running?

steadicam running

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#1 Herman Wong

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Posted 08 August 2014 - 04:51 PM

I have a Pilot and I'm looking for tips on running.  Basically the main issue I see is that as soon as I start moving at a relatively quick pace, I start seeing vertical jiggles in the video.  I've narrowed down the issue to the vibrations transferring from either my left hand on the gimble/post, or to my right hand on the handle (most likely the latter).

 

Running at high(er) speeds makes it more difficult to keep the camera/post in control which makes me have the tendency to try to keep it in control, resulting in more contact/gripping of the handle.  

 

I also look at my feet control and rather than taking large strides like one would normally do while running, I take smaller controlled steps.  The main problem is that it becomes difficult to reach the high speed I want and it gets really tiring.

 

So just looking for tips on what works for you.

 

 

Now I am in no way comparing stabilizers/technique here... but I recently watched a parkour video based on the Assassin's Creed video game.  It was shot on Glidecam 4000 with a RED and no vest, so you can imagine the sheer weight the camera op had to hold during each shot.  Now what intrigued me was how he was able to film high speed running scenes with nary any jiggles like what I'm seeing -- and I'm not even running as fast as him.

 

 


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#2 MichaelReedy

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Posted 08 August 2014 - 08:22 PM

Hi there Herman.

 

There was a very brief discussion regarding the HD4000 thing earlier. Have a read through and see if that answers any of those questions for you.


http://www.steadicam...topic=19540&hl=


Hope it helps.


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#3 David M. Aronson

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Posted 09 August 2014 - 01:49 AM

Herman,

Do you have your threads adjusted correctly? If the rig is trying to fly away from you and you need to grip the gimbal handle tightly, that may be your issue.

From what I've seen from you operating, you like to keep the rig very long, which may add to any vibrations in the rig since it's not a very rigid post. Try shortening the rig and and adding weight if you need more inertia. The Pilot is pretty light and the GH4 is a very light camera. You could easily add 3-4 lbs, shorten your post, and have a very well behaved rig.


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#4 Herman Wong

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Posted 09 August 2014 - 11:20 AM

Oh hey David :)

 

Yes last time we met I did make adjustments to shorten the rig.  Additional weights at the bottom (as you mentioned) to increase inertia and some at the top stage as well.  Perhaps added about 2 pounds overall.

 

Actually I wouldn't be surprised if it was trying to fly away from me - hence the extra gripping I need.  While not running it's perfect and behaves in a controlled manner so I'm assuming the threads are correct? And possibly it's my posture during running that needs work.

 

Thanks

 

 

 

 

 

Herman,

Do you have your threads adjusted correctly? If the rig is trying to fly away from you and you need to grip the gimbal handle tightly, that may be your issue.

From what I've seen from you operating, you like to keep the rig very long, which may add to any vibrations in the rig since it's not a very rigid post. Try shortening the rig and and adding weight if you need more inertia. The Pilot is pretty light and the GH4 is a very light camera. You could easily add 3-4 lbs, shorten your post, and have a very well behaved rig.


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#5 Herman Wong

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Posted 09 August 2014 - 11:25 AM

Very informative thank you!

 

And yes apparently that was the same person (Devin) I was referring to who was filming handheld.  

 

 

 

Hi there Herman.

 

There was a very brief discussion regarding the HD4000 thing earlier. Have a read through and see if that answers any of those questions for you.


http://www.steadicam...topic=19540&hl=


Hope it helps.


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#6 Herman Wong

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Posted 10 August 2014 - 01:43 AM

I did find another source for vibrations and that is on the monitor.  Since I've replaced the stock monitor I cannot use the provided monitor bracket which has an anti-rotation screw.  I've added a layer of velcro to prevent my monitor from twisting but it seems it's giving some room for the monitor to flex forward/back.  Going to have to look into this further as well.


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