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HELP...Problems Shooting w/ Triax Cable


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#1 Mikko Vuokko

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Posted 19 May 2014 - 12:39 PM

Hello fellow Steadicam ops...

My first post...I'm new to the forum and fairly new to Steadicam...2 years.

Question...can someone advise me on how they shoot/config their camera shooting w/ half inch thick Triax cable. It pushes my camera and makes it difficult. My jumper cable went bad...expecting a new one but, will probably be too thick. There is a gentleman in L.A. who makes custom cables that I am aware of but, I cannot use one here b/c it is not "Approved"...don't ask...that's another can of worms.

Please...if someone has a nice, neat way of config a triax I'll be forever in their debt.

Thanks in Advance, much appreciated...

Mikko


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#2 Brant S. Fagan SOC

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Posted 19 May 2014 - 01:39 PM

Try contacting Carmen Abato Enterprises at 714-895-1887 and ask them to make you a 6' Steadicam Triax Jumper; this is the best one out there and no Engineer has ever refused me and pulled that "Approved" thing with me since getting my hands on two of these!  Worth every penny.  Last time I asked, they cost around $750. plus shipping but please don't quote me on that.


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#3 Frederic Sturm

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Posted 20 May 2014 - 04:20 AM

Hi Mikko, and welcome here =)

 

Strongly seconded, a good jumper cable is worth a lot!

 

If you don't get a jumper in quickly enough though and need to improvise, use a small clamp above the gimbal to hold the cable right next to the gimbal, let it drop down with ample room and loop it back up to your vest. That way it will least influence your sled. It's what Larry did on Hugo with a ridiculous bunch of big cables. A half inch Triax really is a bit on the big side of cables though...


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#4 Mikko Vuokko

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Posted 20 May 2014 - 10:13 AM

Try contacting Carmen Abato Enterprises at 714-895-1887 and ask them to make you a 6' Steadicam Triax Jumper; this is the best one out there and no Engineer has ever refused me and pulled that "Approved" thing with me since getting my hands on two of these!  Worth every penny.  Last time I asked, they cost around $750. plus shipping but please don't quote me on that.

Hi Brant...and thanks. Oddly, it was your post that first came up in a google search I did about a week or so ago. You mentioned Carmen Abato in that post and I reached out to him. This is absolutely the way that I want to go but, the powers that be, didn't want to spend the money. So, it looks like I might have to do it myself, depending on what I get when I see the jumper the engineers ordered for me. Thanks a million for your help. It's much appreciated.

Mikko

Oh...btw...Carmen quoted me 400 for one so if you got two, that's not bad. Have a great day,


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#5 Mikko Vuokko

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Posted 20 May 2014 - 10:49 AM

Hi Mikko, and welcome here =)

 

Strongly seconded, a good jumper cable is worth a lot!

 

If you don't get a jumper in quickly enough though and need to improvise, use a small clamp above the gimbal to hold the cable right next to the gimbal, let it drop down with ample room and loop it back up to your vest. That way it will least influence your sled. It's what Larry did on Hugo with a ridiculous bunch of big cables. A half inch Triax really is a bit on the big side of cables though...

Thank you Frederic...that's what I am going to have to do. I tried to google some production images from Hugo to see exactly how Larry did it, but, couldn't find a real good angle on it. I did see what he had to deal with though, which was amazing really. I will improvise as this is the best suggestion yet. Thank you, that helps a lot. Have a great day Frederic.

Mikko


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#6 Osvaldo Silvera SOC

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Posted 20 May 2014 - 11:15 PM


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#7 Frederic Sturm

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Posted 21 May 2014 - 07:36 AM

Cool Video Osvaldo!

 

A clamp right next to he gimbal makes sure that the cable has the least pull on the rig, as its pulling as close to the CG as possible, whatever direction it pulls. Larry uses a bracket made from the stuff they make stop-motion puppets from, like this (just found it in a quick google search to better explain): http://www.pedri-ani...y-puppet-gr.jpg

 

But you could use any clamp above the gimbal with a short arm sticking out next to it much to the same effect. I use something like the Manfrotto nano clamp, but a plastic version which is more lightweight.

 

Always glad to help Mikko, you have a great day, too and good luck with this, I'm sure you'll be fine =)


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#8 Rich Cottrell

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Posted 21 May 2014 - 07:59 AM

Ozzy
Good job putting that simple video together.

I do things similar yet I run the triax in front of the yoke. It adds another thing that gets in the way of the monitor but it lets me pan left.
I always did it this way as that was how I taught myself on my first studio live to tape show.
That was on multicore :~(

I will have to try your way next time I strap on the rig, but either way... Again good work on the video.
Rich
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#9 Rob Vuona SOC

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Posted 22 May 2014 - 01:25 AM

@ Mikko, are you shooting Triax or Fiber ?  If its Fiber, then you will need a Fiber adapter,  6 Foot piece is roughly $600

if its Triax, then all you need is Triax to Coax adapters, (Male and female)  and you use a small BNC between the two.

http://www.gepco.com...triaxtocoax.htm

 

We have been flying triax like that for 15 years.

 

 

@ Ozzie, why aren't you flying a triax adapter and you should run the cable behind your gimbal that way the gimbal keeps the cable out of the way of your grip


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#10 RonBaldwin

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Posted 22 May 2014 - 01:17 PM

when I run a cable (rarely, but usually with gyros) I set it up just like Mr Silvera does.  I didn't like the cable blocking the monitor


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#11 Mikko Vuokko

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Posted 22 May 2014 - 02:17 PM

Thanks for the feedback Osvaldo. Good idea w/ the vid's too, appreciate that. I do set my rig up pretty much like you. I tired Frederic's idea w/ the clamp and that seems to work well. It gives that little extra bit of freedom that I was looking for and gets that cable out of the way for smoother pans. It does however, block the monitor just a little, but, I don't seem to mind. Thanks dude, appreciate the video.

Mikko


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#12 Mikko Vuokko

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Posted 22 May 2014 - 02:18 PM

when I run a cable (rarely, but usually with gyros) I set it up just like Mr Silvera does.  I didn't like the cable blocking the monitor

Thanks for the input Ron...nice little community we got here. Have a good one,

Mikko


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#13 Mikko Vuokko

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Posted 22 May 2014 - 02:25 PM

Cool Video Osvaldo!

 

A clamp right next to he gimbal makes sure that the cable has the least pull on the rig, as its pulling as close to the CG as possible, whatever direction it pulls. Larry uses a bracket made from the stuff they make stop-motion puppets from, like this (just found it in a quick google search to better explain): http://www.pedri-ani...y-puppet-gr.jpg

 

But you could use any clamp above the gimbal with a short arm sticking out next to it much to the same effect. I use something like the Manfrotto nano clamp, but a plastic version which is more lightweight.

 

Always glad to help Mikko, you have a great day, too and good luck with this, I'm sure you'll be fine =)

Hey Frederic...that's a million. I tired your idea and it works. I'm going to run w/ it. Now it's a waiting game until my new jumper gets here. Thanks again, it's a nice little community we have here.

Have a great day Frederic,

Mikko


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#14 Frederic Sturm

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Posted 22 May 2014 - 06:03 PM

Glad our ideas could help you! I myself always enjoy and appreciate the awesome feedback of other ops here, this is what I really like about the forum. Have a great day shooting Mikko :)


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#15 PeterAbraham

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Posted 23 May 2014 - 05:39 PM

Must second the use of a Tri Ax jumper. Use the Tri Ax to Co Ax turnarounds and Mogami 2964 HD Coax. The neoprene jacket allows it to be very flexible and it has more copper than the very thin Belden.

 

If an Engineer balks and throws the whole "Acceptable" crap at you, remind them that the camera will just shut down if the cable shorts. Nothing evil will happen. You won't die of electrocution. Please.

 

In my experience, the ( usually yellow colored jacketed ) "Thinner Tri Ax Jumpers " are insanely stiff. YMMV.

 

Best to all,

 

Peter Abraham, S.O.C.


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