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Docking bracket too short


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#1 Jordan Tetewsky

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Posted 05 March 2014 - 02:53 PM

I fly a glidecam x-22 and the included docking bracket makes it difficult to dynamic balance without putting the rig on, because the setup will hit the c-stand. Anyone know if it's safe to buy a different docking bracket that's longer if it's made by a different company?


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#2 Jens Piotrowski SOC

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Posted 05 March 2014 - 03:45 PM

Don't spin the sled, turn it 90 degrees and let it drop, see what's needs to be adjusted...
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#3 Michael Maga

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Posted 05 March 2014 - 04:10 PM

Its safe if it a quality bracket. Look at the Hill balance bracket to get an idea.


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#4 Jordan Tetewsky

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 12:16 AM

Don't spin the sled, turn it 90 degrees and let it drop, see what's needs to be adjusted...

I'm entirely confused by what this means... 


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#5 Alan Rencher

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 12:25 AM

Don't spin the sled, turn it 90 degrees and let it drop, see what's needs to be adjusted...

I'm entirely confused by what this means...

If the rig favors one side as it falls from 90°, adjust the mass of the sled to compensate.
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#6 Stig Indrebo

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 06:32 AM

You could also go for the Glidecam gold bracket: http://www.bhphotovi...alance_and.html

 

I think it will fit with the x-22, but double check with glidecam first: http://www.glidecam.com/contact.php


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#7 Evrim KAYA

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 07:35 AM

 

Don't spin the sled, turn it 90 degrees and let it drop, see what's needs to be adjusted...

I'm entirely confused by what this means...

If the rig favors one side as it falls from 90°, adjust the mass of the sled to compensate.

 

 

this method only works if battery's and monitor's CG is on the same level (coplanar) -which isn't possible with X-22- and camera CG directly above the post. you'll need to spin balance in order to achieve dynamic balance with your rig.


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#8 Jens Piotrowski SOC

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 12:12 PM

Sorry, but I disagree slightly, if it's co-planar and statically balanced it will always spin flat, that if the gimbal is working properly.

 

Try the 90 degrees method out, it works and btw you can always spin the rig on your arm, the old-school way....


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#9 Evrim KAYA

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 12:58 PM

Sorry, but I disagree slightly. Try it out and btw you can always spin it on your arm, old-school....

 

Hello Jens,

 

From my experience, it is impossible to dynamically balance a non co-planar rig by 90 degrees drop technique. Also the physics behind it doesn't sound correct to me. 

 

But perhaps i'm doing something wrong. Could you tell me step by step how to do it properly (including where to place camera CG on the rig). i'll shoot and share a video with my Ultra2 (a non co-planar rig) using both techniques and see the benefits and drawbacks of each. 

 

Last time people talked about the 2 competing techniques on the forum, it got messy real fast. So this time let's approach this subject scientifically and give this rather interesting subject another chance.


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#10 Jens Piotrowski SOC

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 02:15 PM

Hi Evrim,

 

I think the principal is well explained in the Mickey tool video:

 

 

The 90 degrees method is doing the same thing, just with a camera attached. The mass A (monitor) and mass B (batteries) will start to rotate the sled when doing the side drop test, if their force input into the post is not the same/identical, for lack of a better English. (2nd language :rolleyes: )

 

It would be great if you could shoot a video.


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#11 Evrim KAYA

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 03:02 PM

Hi Evrim,

 

I think the principal is well explained in the Mickey tool video:

 

 

The 90 degrees method is doing the same thing, just with a camera attached. The mass A (monitor) and mass B (batteries) will start to rotate the sled when doing the side drop test, if their force input into the post is not the same/identical, for lack of a better English. (2nd language :rolleyes: )

 

It would be great if you could shoot a video.

 

 

so, are you saying that, it doesn't matter where the camera CG is placed or it should be directly centered on the post?

 

Mickey video suggests that camera CG should be directly over the post (as they balance it without the camera placed; so in order to keep the balance after doing the mickey one should place the camera where it doesn't affect the static balance thus at the center of the main shaft.)

 

OR

 

It doesn't matter where one would place the camera's CG, as one would compensate it by batteries and monitor position?

 

As soon as we could establish the experiment parameters, i'll shoot/share the video. Other operators are welcome to chime in about the technique's specifics.

 

PS: hey, i will be the last guy complaining about your English Jens. it's my second language too ;) 


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#12 Jens Piotrowski SOC

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 03:08 PM

I would place the cg of the camera as close to the center of the post, but you will likely compensate with batteries and/or monitor....


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