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Liquid electrical tape?


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#1 Michael Desiderio

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 07:58 PM

Just curious if anyone uses a little liquid tape to help cover up any fraying connector ends on cables and whatnot.


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#2 Jess Haas SOC

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 11:00 PM

I usually prefer shrink tubing but liquid electrical tape is good stuff for those pesky times when you cant get the shrink tubing where you need it.

Just keep in mind that it isnt as easy to undo so if you use it on something like a connector you may not be able to undo it as easily to fix a problem. Also it can be messy stuff.
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#3 Alan Rencher

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 01:25 AM

Michael, if your cables ends are fraying, you may want to do more than put some glue on them. Are your solder joints breaking?
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#4 Michael Desiderio

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 01:38 AM

Michael, if your cables ends are fraying, you may want to do more than put some glue on them. Are your solder joints breaking?

 

Well, I suppose I would say it's more the ground cabling poking out of the connector rather than the actual cable itself fraying.


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#5 Alan Rencher

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 02:21 AM

I've had that problem: too much slack in the cable, and it starts to show behind the collar. It's impossible to get shrink tubing on without re-soldering. Sometimes I'll put a bit of hot glue or wrap a bit of electrical tape around the end of the cable jacket. I try to put just enough on so that the crimp can catch on the cable once again.
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#6 Michael Desiderio

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 03:19 AM

I've had that problem: too much slack in the cable, and it starts to show behind the collar. It's impossible to get shrink tubing on without re-soldering. Sometimes I'll put a bit of hot glue or wrap a bit of electrical tape around the end of the cable jacket. I try to put just enough on so that the crimp can catch on the cable once again.

Yeah heat shrink tubing would be greaaaat if the lemo connector wasn't 4x the circumference of the cable going into it.  So you think liquid electrical tape by itself is a bit too permanent ?


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#7 Alan Rencher

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 01:02 PM

It depends on what you are trying to accomplish, I guess. Are you trying to just cover the fraying ends so they don't snag, or are you trying to get the frayed ends to stay inside the lemo's collar?


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#8 Tom Wills

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 04:06 PM

I wouldn't recommend liquid electrical tape. What you're experiencing with the shield of the cable coming out of the connector is a mechanical issue, not an electrical one. Liquid electrical tape won't help you much in that regard, it'll just insulate the wire.

 

A few ideas - first of all, I've found you generally can heat shrink the wires going into a LEMO connector, if you take the connector shell off and stretch the heat shrink. For those who don't know that trick yet, all you do is take a pair of needle nose pliers, or other similar device, put the heat shrink over the end, and then pry the pliers open gently, then release the tension, turn the heat shrink, and repeat. Generally, if you're slow and careful, you can stretch good quality heat shrink tubing to about 150% of its original diameter, and it will still shrink down readily. That should allow you to get it over the internal connector bits, shrink it, and then reassemble the connector.

 

If that's not an option, or that still doesn't logistically work, there is something I would recommend that I use for strain relieving cables and insulating them. It's "Rescue Tape" or other brands of self-sealing non-adhesive tape. I actually used it on your and Kyle's Flyer mod that I did for you. It's a tape that sticks to itself, and holds on to both rubber cable and metal connectors very well. I've used it to strain relieve a bunch of LEMO connectors I have made, and so far in several years, none have had issues. Might be worth having a roll of it in your kit.

 

Link for Rescue Tape: http://www.amazon.co...h/dp/B000ZTK6CI


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#9 PeterAbraham

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 09:50 PM

I love how we all have our own take on this kind of issue. I personally am a big fan of liquid electrical tape for certain situations. I use it when assembling the Zalex™ Tally Light Systems I sell. The trick seems to be to NOT go too thin. A very thin schmear cannot be removed easily. On the other hand, with a bit of practice, I can now apply a layer not too thin, but not very goopy. It sets well and does the job- and can be sliced away with an X-Acto knife and a needle nosed pliers.

 

Using a very small cheap watercolor brush is useful. Using the big thick brush attached inside of the lid gives no finesse or control to the application at all.

 

I don't always use it as a replacement for real shrink tubing, but it surely has its place. My two cents !

 

Best to all,

 

Peter Abraham, S.O.C.


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