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Cinetronics monitor bracket issue (image shake)


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#1 Justin Browne

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 01:40 AM

Im just wondering if I'm the only one whose Cinetronics monitor bracket acts like a diving board? I recently noticed this when I had to do some running shots and the whole monitor bounced horribly creating a shake in the image. I put my old transvideo monitor back on and the problem went away instantly so im pretty sure that it is the monitor bracket. Thoughts? Solutions? It seems that some kind of brace/bracket that pulls the curved arms of the monitor bracket together might work.
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#2 Tom Wills

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 02:05 AM

Justin,

 

Is the problem in the yoke for the Cinetronic, or in the rods? When you switched back to the Transvideo, did you change the monitor rods it was mounted on, or just the monitor and yoke?


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#3 Afton Grant

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 08:01 AM

Gen 1 or Gen 2 yoke?

 

I've definitely noticed the octagonal shape of the Gen 2 yoke doesn't lock into the "arms" of the yoke quite as well as the square shape of the Gen 1 yoke.  In each arm, there's a square indent where the horizontal cross piece mates and gets secured into place.  With the Gen 1 yoke, it was a square piece in a square hole, making a nice solid connection.  The Gen 2 puts an octagonal piece in a square hole.  If the screws securing the cross piece to the arms aren't extremely tight, there will be some play in the Gen 2 yoke, which will vibrate.  I'm frequently having to tighten those screws.  I should probably just put Loctite on them.  I'm only hesitant because once they're fixed, I can't loosen OR tighten without a big hassle.


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#4 Brian Freesh

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 08:07 AM

Interesting, I have the same gen 1 or 2 question, but for the opposite reason.

 

I noticed a significant diving board effect with the Gen 1, and it is greatly reduced with the Gen 2.  I believe this is because the monitor arms are shorter.  The monitor is lighter as well, but I run with a battery on the monitor so it's about the same weight over all.

 

But now I'm gonna keep an eye on those screws!


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#5 Matthias Biber

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 09:08 AM

Have a look at the Quattro Monitor Arm from http://cam-jam.de

 

While designing I had 3 main goals:

- reduce vibration

- yoke is adjustable to any angle with solid locking. yoke always stays centered (side to side wise)

- friction contorol mechanics at the tils axist of the monitor (no thumbscrews that will come loose when you tilt the monitor)

 

works with cinetroic 1 and 2, transviedeo 6" and 8", marshall and others


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#6 Osvaldo Silvera SOC

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 05:56 PM

I run quite a bit with the Cam-Jam monitor bracket and the Transvideo Cinemonitor HD6 Classic..Rock solid.


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#7 thomas-english

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 03:12 AM

I noticed a few people out there are using the Satchler bracket. What are issues with that? Is it more solid? 


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#8 Afton Grant

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 04:25 AM

Here's the issue I was talking about.  Taken from directly facing the monitor, you can see it is slanted down toward the right side.  This is because the yoke arms move.  No matter how tightly I screw down the screws on either side, the arms still move, and my monitor lists to one side.  With my hand, I can help it back into place, but it will tilt again within moments.  It's not much and it took me a while of staring at the monitor thinking, "that just doesn't look straight" to figure out what the problem was.  

 

Attached File  Photo Sep 10, 6 43 56 PM.jpg   103.04KB   117 downloads


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#9 Sanjay Sami

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 07:26 AM

Afton,

Those screws are not likely to be able to hold the hexagonal profile unless the ends are knurled like the setscrews in speed rail. That would damage the crosspiece though. What would be the reason for them to switch from square to hex without changing the receiver ?


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#10 Brian Freesh

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 10:29 AM

That's interesting, Afton I've noticed the arms move a bit too. Only happened once so far, didn't give it enough attention to determine a cause.


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#11 Afton Grant

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 10:41 AM

Afton,
Those screws are not likely to be able to hold the hexagonal profile unless the ends are knurled like the setscrews in speed rail. That would damage the crosspiece though. What would be the reason for them to switch from square to hex without changing the receiver ?


I don't know, Sami. It's almost literally a round peg in a square hole, leaving friction alone to keep the two pieces from sliding against each other. The Gen 1 cross piece was square so it made sense, but now that its hexagonal, it would only make sense that the arms had hexagonal recesses too. Or perhaps a set pin? I think that's what I'll end up doing is drill a small hole and add a set pin in either side.
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#12 Michael Maga

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 10:56 AM

Afton, I have the same problem with the gen1.. Last day I worked I had to tighten those 2 screws a few times. I now keep a large phillips head on my dock next to my allen. Loctite might do the trick.. but I pull these out when I break my sled down at the end of the day..so not really an option for me.


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#13 Jens Piotrowski SOC

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 11:07 AM

 

Afton,
Those screws are not likely to be able to hold the hexagonal profile unless the ends are knurled like the setscrews in speed rail. That would damage the crosspiece though. What would be the reason for them to switch from square to hex without changing the receiver ?


I don't know, Sami. It's almost literally a round peg in a square hole, leaving friction alone to keep the two pieces from sliding against each other. The Gen 1 cross piece was square so it made sense, but now that its hexagonal, it would only make sense that the arms had hexagonal recesses too. Or perhaps a set pin? I think that's what I'll end up doing is drill a small hole and add a set pin in either side.

 

2 set pins, like the gen 1 should fix it. first time i saw this i thought, why change something that worked on the Gen1, must be the extra cost and labor factor, i guess...


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