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Waterproof your everything (new product NeverWet)


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#1 William Demeritt

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 04:20 PM

I remember reading about this product last year, but it's finally on shelves at Home Depot right now. 

 

 

http://www.homedepot...74232/204216476

 

Base coat and a top coat, says there's enough for 10-15 sq ft of coverage. All of the product demonstrations on the YouTube video are pretty inspiring. I'm going to go pick up a kit and give me vest a trial run. However, seems like it might be a good way to "waterproof" your sled and equipment. Looks like it will work on just about anything you don't need to be clear afterwards, since it leaves a foggy layer afterwards. 

 

Anyway, seemed cool and wanted to share. Off to Home Depot I go... 


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#2 Bryan Fowler

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 05:05 PM

I didn't realize it was available at THD. That's awesome. Tell us what you end up putting it on.


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#3 Alec Jarnagin SOC

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 05:44 PM

I think its best not to inhale it!


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#4 William Demeritt

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 05:49 PM

I think its best not to inhale it!

 

Important safety tip, thanks Egon.


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#5 Victor Lazaro

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 06:37 PM

Will the coating last how resistant is it to scratches? what happens on the long run? 


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#6 William Demeritt

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 07:13 PM

Will the coating last how resistant is it to scratches? what happens on the long run? 


You know what I know: is an adhesive coating that's is "ultra hydrophobic", so it repels water pretty amazingly. I imagine it wears or scratches away like any other paint or adhesive coating. I'm going to test it to see how it goes.
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#7 Tony Deemer

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 07:14 PM

How can you tell when it is time to reapply this coating? They never say what the half life of this is.


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#8 Jameson Johnson

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 09:12 PM

I wonder how flexible it would be if applied to cloth...


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#9 William Demeritt

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 09:30 PM

How can you tell when it is time to reapply this coating? They never say what the half life of this is.

 

The company that invented the stuff has a White Paper I just downloaded, shows a piece of steel that was exposed to 1,000 hours of salt fog coated in polyurethane and another coated in NeverWet, and the NeverWet stuff has minimal corrosion. They seem to be advertising it for industrial solutions. I would bet you could introduce it to the normal cleaning cycle (you guys do clean your gear regularly, RIGHT?) and just reapply anytime you wipe it down. 

 

I'll hose down a wash cloth in the stuff tomorrow and see how it does. Also curious to know how quickly casual contact degrades it (like coating the top of the arm, etc).


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#10 William Demeritt

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 09:43 PM

Here's a part of the white paper on the durability: 

 

Ross data is also compared by SH coating described in recent literature and tested at Ross. Figure 3 shows that Ross coatings are over 200 times more durable than competitive coatings. Ross coatings are not only durable but can also be applied to many substrates such as various metals and alloys, glass, rubber, ceramics, and fabrics. The coatings can be applied to both simple and complex contoured shapes. The complex shape coated with Ross Coating is section of steam generator, Fig. 4. This section of the steam turbine was tested in a wind turbine at 68miles/hour under simulated steam turbine water condensing conditions. No condensation was noted on Ross coated surfaces under these test conditions. 

 

 

 

The Ross coatings have been tested for upper use temperature and data shows that they can be used up to 205oC (400oF) for long periods and can have temperature transients of up to 288oC (550oF). On the lower end we have dipped our aluminum coated sample in to liquid Nitrogen and brought to room temperature and every time it was at RT, we bent it ~10 degrees. At least 10 liquid nitrogen dips were done and each dip was for about 3 minutes. Total bend angle was 120 degrees. We found that the cycling in liquid nitrogen and bending after such a thermal gradient did not produce any delamination or chipping of the coating. The sample was still superhydrophobic. 


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#11 RonBaldwin

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 09:54 PM

if it's resistant to oils and sugary deserts while applied to a brass pole it may be the find of the century


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#12 PeterAbraham

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 10:23 PM

 

How can you tell when it is time to reapply this coating? They never say what the half life of this is.

 

The company that invented the stuff has a White Paper I just downloaded, shows a piece of steel that was exposed to 1,000 hours of salt fog coated in polyurethane and another coated in NeverWet, and the NeverWet stuff has minimal corrosion. They seem to be advertising it for industrial solutions. I would bet you could introduce it to the normal cleaning cycle (you guys do clean your gear regularly, RIGHT?) and just reapply anytime you wipe it down. 

 

I'll hose down a wash cloth in the stuff tomorrow and see how it does. Also curious to know how quickly casual contact degrades it (like coating the top of the arm, etc).

 

 

Define regularly...    :D

 

I'm interested in trying it out.


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#13 Alan Rencher

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 10:59 PM

I've been following Liquipel (http://www.liquipel.com/) for awhile. This looks like a nice end user solution, but it would be nice if manufacturers coated their products in hydrophobic compounds during the manufacturing process. Wouldn't we all love a waterproof Cinetronic? 


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#14 William Demeritt

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 11:10 PM

I've been following Liquipel (http://www.liquipel.com/) for awhile. This looks like a nice end user solution, but it would be nice if manufacturers coated their products in hydrophobic compounds during the manufacturing process. Wouldn't we all love a waterproof Cinetronic? 

 

I hear the Cinetronic Gen 2 IS waterproof (as in, full immersion waterproof)... now if only I could actually GET mine. 


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#15 Alan Rencher

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 11:13 PM

Anyone brave enough to test just how waterproof it is?

 

I kind of want to send all of my gear to Liquipel; although that might be cost prohibitive.


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