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a case of the vapours


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#1 chris fawcett

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Posted 03 June 2005 - 12:07 PM

Hi All,

I'm to shoot some static monologues on DV, which are to be video projected onto a column of rising steam in a darkened space. Then, I'm to Steadicam shoot that, 360 degrees.

I've been asked to take charge technically too. So far, I don't forsee any problems, but must admit to being completely beggared in the imagination department. Has anyone ever projected onto steam? Has anyone ever tried shooting something projected onto steam, from all angles?

Any nuggets of advice would be welcome,

Chris
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#2 RobVanGelder

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Posted 04 June 2005 - 10:39 AM

with laser?
works on any particle stuff, smoke, dust or steam
But a real image is more difficult.
I´m sure you can program a laser-system to get a detailed image, will be probably monochromatic and with limited shades of gray/light, but that might be better anyway as the steam will provide the different shades in densities of steam droplets.
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#3 chris fawcett

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Posted 04 June 2005 - 01:41 PM

Rob,

It will be standard video projection, but I'll shoot the projection material in B+W. If It really doesn't look like anything, I'll hide a big sheet of glass in the steam column. We'll see. I'll let you know how it goes, if you like.

Khawp khun khrap,

Chris
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#4 RobVanGelder

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Posted 04 June 2005 - 09:52 PM

Chris, even with standard video it might be helpfull if you have a hight contrast picture or even severely edge-enhanced. It would be more like a black and white edge-on-detail only picture, to get enough contrast on the fussy steam.

An interesting project, let me know how it worked out.

Mai pen rai, sawaddee krap :D
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#5 Mitch Gross

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Posted 04 June 2005 - 10:09 PM

If you want to be able to somewhat clearly see the image, you will need to have a somewhat 2-dimensional surface to project onto. I would suggest using dry ice and having the steam fall rather than rise. You can take a pipe, lie it horizontally and pop a series of holes in it and let gravity do the work. Either that or try sandwiching your steam between two sheets of glass to contain it.
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#6 Rich Steel

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Posted 05 June 2005 - 04:03 PM

I've seen something similiar done on an exhibition stand and it was a complete failure. They had a pipe with holes where the smoke came out. You couldn't really see the projection with your eyes never mind a camera. After seeing the exhibition stand I'd recomend you try and contain it, like Mitch says....sandwich the steam/smoke/dry ice between 2 pieces of glass and I think that will work AOK.

Good luck either way...you'll need it.
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#7 thomas-english

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Posted 05 June 2005 - 04:51 PM

How bright was the ambient light at the exhibition stand?

keep other lights low to get an effect. I ve projected through firework smoke (only textures) and I ve seen some wicked projections through waterfalls, waterfountains and other water spray type stuff.

Ive done stage shows where my projectors are rear projecting onto the screens and they ve cracked out the dry ice and it looked cool. (to me behind the screens).

try it out. Just get a smoke machine and a projector and see how it looks. Rob is very right though... very simple block colour images.

Weve all shot the cheesy horror movie shot where you drench the area in smoke and put a massive light behind your monster to have his shadow loom above you throught the smoke

its going to be hit and miss though at best.

I am sure if you search the archives of the cinematography forum this has been deliberated at lengh

also check the VJ forums (visual jockeys)
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#8 chris fawcett

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Posted 06 June 2005 - 07:26 AM

Dear All,

You have given me much food for thought. I'll post again in 2 weeks to tell how (or if) it worked out.

Thanks,

Chris
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#9 JimBartell

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Posted 16 June 2005 - 11:47 AM

You might want to look at this. I don't know if it will help but it's pretty cool.

http://www.fogscreen.com/


Jim "in a fog" Bartell
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#10 chris fawcett

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Posted 17 June 2005 - 10:17 AM

http://www.fogscreen.com/

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Very cool.

Thanks everyone for the advice. It worked out quite well with the steam, though the result was ethereal in the extreme. Fortunately, that's what was wanted.

Chris
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