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F65 on Flyer LE (power supply and balance)


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#1 Pascal Combes-Knoke

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 02:28 PM

Hey guys,

I'm a fairly new operator and I have a 3 day shoot coming up with the F65 on my Flyer LE (24lb). As far as I know I can only power from a tethered brick is that true?

If this is the case what is the best way to minimize the cord's influence? I had a different shoot where I wrapped the HDMI cable around my wrist then tucked into my vest but it was still difficult to compensate for its tug.

Otherwise is there any way I can power the camera from my sled?

I would love to hear feedback from you guys.

Thanks,

Pascal
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#2 Brian Freesh

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 02:32 PM

I just want to be the first to say:

F65 on my Flyer LE (24lb)


NO.

But since you're probably gonna do it anyway: Good Luck!
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#3 Mike Germond SOC

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 02:36 PM

Oh man. I tried some things back when I had a Flyer LE (so did Brian I think) but NO NO NO I wouldn't put myself in a position to fail like that.

Agreeance with Brian. But if you do it, report back.
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#4 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 02:41 PM

Wrong gear to fly that camera. Let me guess you don't plan on using a remote focus... What if they want to fly a codex? A boxx? A Obie or ring light?


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#5 GrantCulwell

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 02:43 PM

I use to own a Flyer LE. I will be really surprised if you are able to put an F65 on that and be able to balance (you might even be risking breaking something).

If you try it, strip everything! It'll suck having a bunch of cables hanging off but I don't see any other way to fly it.

Good luck.
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#6 GrantCulwell

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 02:44 PM

Wrong gear to fly that camera. Let me guess you don't plan on using a remote focus... What if they want to fly a codex? A boxx? A Obie or ring light?


End of the day, I completely agree with Eric, this is the wrong gear for the job. If you have the time and the connections, I'd look into sub renting another larger rig.
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#7 Alan Rencher

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 02:46 PM

Woa... So many things going on in this one post that I don't think anyone here knows where to start.

For one, an LE can only hold 19 or 20 lbs, and the F65 weighs 15 lbs with just the brain. If you would power the camera from the sled, you would need to have a cable that plugs into the lemo port on the top stage, not from your vest...
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#8 Pascal Combes-Knoke

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 02:48 PM

I appreciate this advice. Assuming I can strip it down to under 24 lbs with compact primes and clip on matte box my only concern is the the thick cable tether....do you think that is manageable or do you actually think im asking for failure?
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#9 Pascal Combes-Knoke

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 02:48 PM

my rig has the "manufactures defect" where it can actually go 24lbs
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#10 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 02:55 PM

I appreciate this advice. Assuming I can strip it down to under 24 lbs with compact primes and clip on matte box my only concern is the the thick cable tether....do you think that is manageable or do you actually think im asking for failure?


Let's look at this.

You can't power it from your sled

You can't fly normal accessories

You are well over the design load of the sled

So tell me how this s a good idea. Have you worked with theses guys before? Most DP's don't like being limited on their choices You are setting yourself up for a huge failure
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#11 Brian Freesh

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 03:16 PM

You can't power it from your sled

You can't fly normal accessories

You are well over the design load of the sled


This.



As my 2nd gen Flyer (15lb max) could carry and balance (no telescoping post) 24lbs worth of camera, I've no doubt your LE arm springs are up to the task. And I sympathize with your thought process and willingness to max the rig out.

I usually kept my camera weight down to 20lbs max (5 over spec), once or twice went a pound or so over. That was a Red One, Zeiss prime, clip on mattebox, motor and BFD Rx, Modulus Tx, and cables. I also had upgraded to 14g wire in my sled, so powering wasn't an issue.

My Flyer has some observable wear from those experiences. And the times I went over 20lbs were because something went wrong and we had to add a piece of gear to make things work again (several days with a raid drive for example) so I saved myself from failure by having room to breathe on the arm. But unless you're gonna be steadi all day it's not really worth the extra time to turn it over. And I'd practiced the set-up before I ever offered it to a client so I could do it fast on set. And I was very clear ahead of time, via email (for proof I'd warned 'em) about the limitations of the camera set-up. And believe me when I say you can't trust them to be happy about issues that you made them aware of when it's slowing things down on set. Maybe it's technically not your fault (maybe it is), but they'll put it on you.

All in all it was a pain the ass, and overly stressful. And that's when I had my ducks in a row. Imagine if you go in unprepared.

Everyone is right, you're setting yourself up for failure. Either rent a larger rig, pass on the gig, or pass the gig to someone else. If you decide on the later, I'm avail :)

If you do it (DON'T), I'd love to see pics, the total weight, and hear how the battle went. I have an accurate scale if you need :)
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#12 Martin Stacey

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 04:31 PM

I'd like to see photos of the condition of your gimbal after that shoot. If it's not broken it will most likely be bent. Your arm may lift it but I wouldn't guarentee that your gimbal will do the same. Could be an expensive mistake when it snaps and the camera is laying on the floor in peices.
Don't do it!!!
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#13 Victor Lazaro

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 04:39 PM

This MUST be a joke!
If you have the budget for a F65, you should have a budget for a real Steadicam and operator with the appropriate tools for the job. Otherwise, use another camera that the Flyer can fly (Epic)

DO NOT DO IT!!!!!!!!
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#14 Lars Erik

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 07:02 PM

Pascal,

listen to the community. They're all giving you really good advice here. Unless the DP is a close relative, find a new rig or pass on the job.

You do this, and you'll probably get burned for a long time. Trust me. I know. There is no worse feeling in the world, than have the whole crew look at you and you know you're not delivering the goods. It's like standing on the doorsteps of hell. Being a newbie, it will also most likely take a big chunk of your confidence. You don't want that. I'm only saying this because of the rig vs the camera. I am not speaking of your skills as an operator.

I know that certain jobs are tempting, but you do not have the right tools for the job. Period. Oh, and if you do it, whatever you do, don't let insurance know..

All the best,

LE
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#15 William Demeritt

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 08:13 PM

I say go for it and post the footage afterwards. Can I come shoot BTS?
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