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First Shoot with a Steadicam


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#1 Rob Ruscher

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 05:26 PM

Just got the edited piece of a video I did with a few friends. Would love any critique, advice, or whatever else. About half is shot with the Scout while the rest is handheld.


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#2 Janice Arthur

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 09:23 AM

Rob;

nice effort.

Steadicam hard to judge, don't know your experience level but right away Id say headroom seems random. Do you trim for each shot?

Did you plan and rehearse each shot or just shoot randomly like a documentary?

The slow-mo not only extends each shot but is very forgiving of mistakes. (i always love slow-mo on my work because I look liike a genius!)

Good luck

Janice
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#3 Rob Ruscher

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 09:16 AM

Thanks Janice. My experience level is about a 0 for steadicam. I had it for a weekend thanks to my rental house and decided to shoot something other than my apartment and courtyard. First time tracking someone with it (other than a glidecam).

Not too much was planned other than locations. It was more about getting steady shots and feeling comfortable in the rig. Head room and framing will be what I concentrate on next time.

Thanks for the critique!


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#4 Elliot Gabor

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 11:26 AM

Rob, your avatar makes you look like a pro so you halfway there already =)

I would agreed with both of Janice's sentiments. Headroom seemed lacking at first (got better as the video went on) and slow motion is very forgiving which makes it hard to judge.
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#5 Janice Arthur

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 04:04 PM

Rob;

We all understand your enthusiasm at your first shoot but you should next work on a many projects, free or not, and compile a reel before you post projects again.

Its hard to keep your credibility if you post, off the cuff projects, and your first try. (There are many with hundreds of hours of practice in that would not post a reel.)

We welcome your input, and like many many many newbies before you, you are learning.

Good luck and we hope to see future work as you evolve.

Janice
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#6 Rob Ruscher

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 04:43 PM

Thanks Elliot I will concentrate on head room for the next time I get practice with the rig. Great advice.

Janice I appreciate your first comment and that will help next time I have the rig. However, I disagree with what you said about posting a video of my practice.

If I did not post, I wouldn't have gotten feedback and wouldn't have learned what to do next time. I find posting work is a great way to learn, network and get jobs. It has worked for my career as a DP and camera operator and have a feeling it will work for this. I just feel you can't learn only by reading and watching others.

Again thanks for the initial comment as I will use this to improve.
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#7 Janice Arthur

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 05:13 PM

Rob;

We are all trying to be nice here, but in your heart you knew there were issues and you probably knew what they were when you shot them. You were certainly very excited to show your work.

Read all you want and have input but trust me the 'credibility' thing will come into play if you post lots of beginning videos and you'll get an even more tepid reaction to your posts.

My words were chosen carefully to encourage and not offend but others would not be so kind.

Again good luck and you'll figure it out but posting your first practice is not really why others are here to have input.

Janice
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#8 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 09:41 PM

Headroom is all over the place and slow mo is a cheap trick to try to look better, I fast forward most reels anyway so I see the slow-mo camouflaged issues, One other thing that needs work is composition. We are camera operators first and formost.

Oh and you can see every step
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#9 Alan Rencher

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 09:16 PM

Rob, Janice is one of the nicest and most helpful people on this forum. It would be wise to take her advice, and not puff your chest out in a display of misguided righteousness. They are right, and you are wrong. I can bet that Eric has been operating since before you were born, so listen to him too.

On a side note, your footage looks like most who have spent a few months learning. Your on your way, but operating is both a science and an art.
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#10 Rob Ruscher

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Posted 16 March 2013 - 11:50 AM

Alan I think you misinterpreted my tone with what I said. I am taking what Janice said for next time and see where she is coming from. I respect who she is and her advice but don't have to agree with every word. I won't post 'test' or practice videos on this forum.

 

Eric good call with the slomo. Definitely not a reel, just a first test but will make sure I don't do that next time. Headroom and composition is what I have been working very hard at have seen some improvement. Thank you.


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#11 Daniel Stilling DFF

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 08:18 AM

I remember the first few times I strapped on a stabilization device to my body. I was so excited about the results, as I had never achieved footage stabilized like that. But after analyzing it a little bit I started seeing the problems I see in your footage. Bobbing headroom, level, and steps.
After that I started practicing, practicing, practicing... I only felt comfortable taking someone's money after about 2 years.

My advice is pretty obvious. It takes practice. Start cranking!

Oh, and on a side note, in my days (now I sound old...), searching through focus on the shot was a huge no no... Am I the only one sick and tired of the need for extreme shallow DOF, in every single shot?
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#12 Rob Ruscher

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 07:26 PM

I remember the first few times I strapped on a stabilization device to my body. I was so excited about the results, as I had never achieved footage stabilized like that. But after analyzing it a little bit I started seeing the problems I see in your footage. Bobbing headroom, level, and steps.
After that I started practicing, practicing, practicing... I only felt comfortable taking someone's money after about 2 years.

My advice is pretty obvious. It takes practice. Start cranking!

Oh, and on a side note, in my days (now I sound old...), searching through focus on the shot was a huge no no... Am I the only one sick and tired of the need for extreme shallow DOF, in every single shot?

 

Great advice thank you Daniel. Yeah it was all shot on DSLRs and looking to get away from that. Add shooting when the sun goes down and hence the need for shooting wide open. The shots that were searching for focus were handheld but again, looking to get away from shooting on DSLRs (at least all the time)


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