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3A Arm - Velcro allen wrench?


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#1 Kyle Fasanella

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 12:10 PM

Has anyone tried velcro on an allen wrench to the underside on their arm?

Looking for any tips to make the arm easy and quick to adjust

thank you.
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#2 Victor Lazaro

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 12:13 PM

Velcroman is back! What about a heavy duty magnet?
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#3 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 12:52 PM

Carry the t-handle allen between the vest pad and the spar

Is this really a question that needs to be asked on a forum?
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#4 Victor Lazaro

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 12:57 PM

There is no wrong questions, only wrong answers...
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#5 Jerry Holway

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 01:18 PM

A long time ago many of us used a battery-powered screwdriver with a hex drive for large weight adjustments (or the unnecessary, end-of-the-day relaxing of springs) - I had mine in a bag hanging from the stand along with other accessories. Lots of operators had (or still have) velcro or clips on the vest spar exterior, as some of us removed or reduced the chest pad, or simply liked that location. To me it seems like the most convenient place for a regular allen wrench, but might be tough for a big T-handled one. So do whatever works for you.

Jerry
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#6 Afton Grant

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 01:24 PM

Why not just on the dock? You should never be so far away that you wouldn't be able to access it. It's where you build your sled at the beginning of the day anyway, so it should be where you prep your arm as well. Any weight changes to the sled would take place on the dock. I'd rather minimize the amount of stuff I'm strapping to myself if possible.
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#7 joe mcnally

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 01:24 PM

Hey Kyle, reminds of my original Mod 111 manual it states "Have your assistant do this" he he.
I put mine on the docking bracket
All best
Joe
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#8 Ken Nguyen

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 02:32 PM

Best is leaving it on the dock.
You need to dock your sled to adjust your arm anyway, why bother to carry it with you!
For some, keeping the T-bar allen on the chest spar is a fashion. It's not very practical.

Cheers,

Ken Nguyen.
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#9 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 02:46 PM

For some, keeping the T-bar allen on the chest spar is a fashion. It's not very practical.


How do you figure? it's VERY practical
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#10 Ken Nguyen

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 02:52 PM

For some, keeping the T-bar allen on the chest spar is a fashion. It's not very practical.


How do you figure? it's VERY practical


Eric, sorry if I'm wrong.
Can you show me how practical it is?

Cheers,

Ken Nguyen.
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#11 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 12:17 AM

For some, keeping the T-bar allen on the chest spar is a fashion. It's not very practical.


How do you figure? it's VERY practical


Eric, sorry if I'm wrong.
Can you show me how practical it is?


Better yet you tell me how it's not practical
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#12 Alec Jarnagin SOC

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 01:01 AM

Personally, I'm with Afton. The dock should never be too far away. The 3a arms needed to have the sled docked. Pro arms are so forgiving that having a wrench on the vest is overkill.
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#13 Ken Nguyen

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 08:59 PM

For some, keeping the T-bar allen on the chest spar is a fashion. It's not very practical.


How do you figure? it's VERY practical


Eric, sorry if I'm wrong.
Can you show me how practical it is?


Better yet you tell me how it's not practical


Eric,
Ha ha ha! You are quite funny!

You stood up against my statement.
That meant you are very sure what you are saying is right.
So, prove it.
Prove that I'm wrong by reason please.

Ken Nguyen.
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#14 Eric Fletcher S.O.C.

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 01:08 AM

I'm still waiting for you to tell me why it's a "Fashion Statement" and not practical
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#15 Jerry Holway

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 09:32 AM

One more great thing about teaching workshops all over the world is coming face to face with lots of different operators and discovering all their different approaches, solutions, concerns, work environments, etc. I’ve adopted many of their ideas into my own working habits. Some of these ideas and approaches have no relevance to the kind of work I do, but I find them all extraordinarily interesting as ways of thinking about Steadicam operating and its challenges.

For instance, I have taught a lot of workshops with Peter Abraham, who I like and admire a great deal, and we have a running “tiff” about techniques for having cables exit the rig. Both methods and the concerns behind our two methods are taught, and the rationale for each is explained (passionately!). It’s up the participants to figure out what works for them in their world, even if the answer is that neither of our approaches works for them. It’s more about thinking clearly about the issue, what’s important, what’s not, what’s critical, what’s personal or whimsical, relevant…

Peter also has a different way of nailing whip pans than I do, and I was skeptical until I saw the result when he did the test shot. His method is quite different than mine and amazingly good – but clearly it doesn’t make one right and the other wrong if they both get the job done.

Regardless of where one puts an Allen key, folks might be interested in knowing that there are things called “High Torque Hex L-Keys with more “bite” than standard keys. I’ve found them really useful in the small sizes, especially where any sort of mild Locktite was put on the threads.

A link: http://www.mcmaster....-l-keys/=laezsm

Jerry
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